Biology – E JEMED http://e-jemed.org/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 01:26:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://e-jemed.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1-150x150.png Biology – E JEMED http://e-jemed.org/ 32 32 The Colorado shooter is the biological grandson of a California Assemblyman https://e-jemed.org/the-colorado-shooter-is-the-biological-grandson-of-a-california-assemblyman/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 01:26:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/the-colorado-shooter-is-the-biological-grandson-of-a-california-assemblyman/ The suspect in a mass shooting at a Colorado LGBTQ nightclub is the biological grandson of California Congressman Randy Voepel, multiple sources close to Voepel confirmed Monday. Sources close to Voepel told KCRA 3 that the MP had not had a relationship with the alleged gunman, Anderson Aldrich, 22, for almost 10 years. Voepel’s office […]]]>

The suspect in a mass shooting at a Colorado LGBTQ nightclub is the biological grandson of California Congressman Randy Voepel, multiple sources close to Voepel confirmed Monday. Sources close to Voepel told KCRA 3 that the MP had not had a relationship with the alleged gunman, Anderson Aldrich, 22, for almost 10 years. Voepel’s office said the Republican congressman was not ready to comment Monday afternoon. As of 2016, Voepel represents the 71st Assembly District, which encompasses parts of Riverside and San Diego counties. After Saturday’s shooting, Voepel and his office received death threats and calls to resign, even though Voepel lost his Assembly seat in midterm elections a few weeks ago. Voepel’s district was redrawn into the new 75th Assembly District, forcing a Republican vs. Republican race between him and another incumbent, Assemblyman Marie Waldron. Waldron had so far received 68% of the vote on Monday. Voepel, a Vietnam veteran, served as vice-chairman of the Assembly’s Committee on Aging and Long-Term Care and the Committee on Military and Veterans Affairs. In his last campaign, Voepel’s platforms included improving public safety, lowering the cost of living, ending homelessness, helping veterans and protecting gun rights. fire in California. Aldrich has been held on murder and hate crime charges since the attack at Club Q in Colorado Springs on Saturday night that killed five people and injured 17 others. In 2021, Aldrich’s mother reported that he threatened her with a pipe bomb. The Associated Press reported that he was not prosecuted. Sources close to Voepel said he did not attempt to interfere with the actions of law enforcement in this situation. As reports resurface of Voepel’s past commentary comparing the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol to the Revolutionary War, his relatives pointed KCRA 3 to a statement he made at that time, noting that he neither supported nor condoned what had happened. “The events that have taken place, however unacceptable, are a sign of a deep division that our nation is currently facing, Voepel wrote five days after the uprising. “That’s why it’s especially important that each of us works very hard to bridge the divisions between us.” A national security advocacy group urged the state legislature to expel him for his comments after Jan. 6, but those calls were unsuccessful.

The suspect in a mass shooting at a Colorado LGBTQ nightclub is the biological grandson of California Congressman Randy Voepel, multiple sources close to Voepel confirmed Monday.

Sources close to Voepel told KCRA 3 that the MP had not had a relationship with the alleged gunman, Anderson Aldrich, 22, for almost 10 years.

Voepel’s office said the Republican congressman was not ready to comment Monday afternoon.

As of 2016, Voepel represents the 71st Assembly District, which encompasses parts of Riverside and San Diego counties. After Saturday’s shooting, Voepel and his office received death threats and calls to resign, even though Voepel lost his Assembly seat in midterm elections a few weeks ago.

Voepel’s district was redrawn into the new 75th Assembly District, forcing a Republican vs. Republican race between him and another incumbent, Assemblywoman Marie Waldron. Waldron had so far received 68% of the vote on Monday.

Voepel, a Vietnam veteran, served as vice-chairman of the Assembly’s Committee on Aging and Long-Term Care and the Committee on Military and Veterans Affairs.

In his last campaign, Voepel’s platforms included improving public safety, lowering the cost of living, ending homelessness, helping veterans and protecting gun rights. fire in California.

Aldrich has been held on murder and hate crime charges since the attack at Club Q in Colorado Springs on Saturday night that killed five people and injured 17 others.

In 2021, Aldrich’s mother reported that he threatened her with a pipe bomb. The Associated Press reported that he was not prosecuted.

Sources close to Voepel said he did not attempt to interfere with the actions of law enforcement in this situation.

As reports resurface of Voepel’s past commentary comparing the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol to the Revolutionary War, his relatives pointed KCRA 3 to a statement he made at that time, noting that he neither supported nor condoned what had happened.

“The events that have taken place, however unacceptable, are a sign of a deep division that our nation is currently facing,” Voepel wrote five days after the uprising. “That’s why it’s especially important that each of us works very hard to bridge the divisions between us.”

A national security advocacy group urged the state legislature to expel him for his comments after Jan. 6, but those calls were unsuccessful.

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Remote-controlled microscopes bring complex biology education to students around the world https://e-jemed.org/remote-controlled-microscopes-bring-complex-biology-education-to-students-around-the-world/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 17:27:16 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/remote-controlled-microscopes-bring-complex-biology-education-to-students-around-the-world/ In many communities around the world, students’ ability and enthusiasm to pursue STEM fields in their high school and college careers is limited by a lack of resources that prevents them from accessing a complex curriculum based on projects like their peers. The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated these existing educational inequalities, requiring new solutions to […]]]>

In many communities around the world, students’ ability and enthusiasm to pursue STEM fields in their high school and college careers is limited by a lack of resources that prevents them from accessing a complex curriculum based on projects like their peers. The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated these existing educational inequalities, requiring new solutions to democratize access to this field.

UC Santa Cruz researchers have developed a method of using remote-controlled, Internet-connected microscopes to allow students around the world to participate in designing and performing biological experiments.

A new study in the journal Heliyon details this new, scalable framework for bringing project-based STEM education to students who otherwise would not have access to it. The researchers implemented the microscope technology in the biology classrooms of several Latinx communities in the United States and Latin America, and found that their technology was an effective and scalable approach to empowering underrepresented STEM students to conduct complex experiments remotely.

“Taking an internet-connected camera and putting it in the telescope of a microscope is something a lot of labs could do, said Pierre Baudin, PhD in computer engineering. student at the Baskin School of Engineering and first author of the article. “In laying out the framework in this article, the idea was to create a roadmap so that any lab that feels some sort of mission or desire to create educational resources for their community or others can set up some kind of of similar experience, allowing this concept to spread.

Tissue culture experiments are generally unheard of in high school and even in the early years of college, yet in user studies conducted for this research, underserved high school students at Alisal High School in the rural Salinas Valley near Santa Cruz may have had these experiences. .

“We allow students to do experiments that are not normally possible for [many] schools around the world, either because the materials are hazardous, or because the equipment is expensive or requires specific training for teachers and students,” said Mohammed Mostajo-Radji, lead researcher of this study.

Development of the new method

Although project-based learning has proven to be an effective method for teaching STEM concepts, it is limited by barriers such as the cost and logistics of shipping materials to isolated communities, limited teacher training, underfunded schools and potential exposure to hazardous materials. Through extensive experience working with nonprofits in education, Mostajo-Radji of UCSC’s Genomics Institute determined that a successful solution must be scalable and affordable, adaptable to local context of a school and allow students to fully explore the scientific method.

Mostajo-Radji and many other UCSC Genomics Institute researchers involved in this project believe that performing complex biological experiments via remote-controlled microscopes may be a solution that meets these criteria.

The technology that powers these remote experiments was originally developed to allow researchers from several geographically separated institutions to collaborate on stem cell research as part of a multi-institutional group called the Braingeneers. Graduate students Baudin and Victoria Ly developed the tool to control microscopes remotely from anywhere in the world, to enable non-invasive observation of cell cultures in incubators.

Mostajo-Radji, who previously served as Bolivia’s ambassador for science, technology and innovation, acknowledged that microscopy technology could be leveraged for distance education amid growing educational gaps in education. equity during the pandemic.

“[The remote-controlled microscopes] were not developed for educational purposes,” Mostajo-Radji said. “What we’ve done is take a lot of the lessons that we’ve learned from the nonprofit work of me and others to build something that’s quite remarkable.”

Mostajo-Radji believes this article is the first to describe a method that is both truly distant and makes full use of the scientific method, introducing inquiry and active learning into lessons, which can be particularly important for students who are less memorization-based learners.

Learn from students around the world

The article describes a framework for other laboratories and classrooms to conduct remote-controlled experiments, in which students design an experiment, make observations, analyze data, and present their results.

The researchers learned from several studies of users who used this method locally with advanced biology students from Alisal High School in Salinas, and abroad with students from two different universities in Bolivia and multinational students involved in the non-profit organization Science Clubs International. The experiments were conducted in Santa Cruz and San Francisco and accessed completely remotely by students. The lessons for each group reflected the student’s local context and complemented an already existing curriculum.

The program’s first pilot began in fall 2020, at the height of the pandemic. The programs varied between the different groups and generally lasted about eight weeks. The researchers met weekly for lessons with some of the groups of students, and with other groups they gave a tutorial on how to use the technology at first and allowed them to conduct the experiments in a way independent.

One experiment that was conducted with students at Salinas was a “clinical trial in a dish” that allowed students to see the effect of new drugs on neuroblastoma, a cancerous tumor, in cell lines. In other experiments, students investigated the biocompatibility of custom-made gold and graphene nanoparticles

Surveys conducted at the end of user study programs showed that this method had a positive impact on STEM identity among both cohorts, although more strongly among Bolivian students, and led to increased overall interest in participating students. These results offered an opportunity to understand STEM motivation among Latinx populations without the extrapolation of findings from a geographically limited study.

“For many of these educational strategies and policies, [researchers] I like to think that a study done in a particular region of the world is representative to inform policy in another part of the world,” Mostajo-Radji said. “Here, for the first time, we painstakingly compare groups of Hispanic [in California] and Hispanics Abroad, in the exact same classroom setting, exactly the same lesson, and exactly the same experiences.

Expand the program

The team is now in the process of applying for grants to build the infrastructure needed to expand this work. They envision an app that would allow high school and community college students from anywhere in the world who wouldn’t otherwise engage in research to design and run experiments completely remotely. Researchers recently created the Live Cell Biotechnology Discovery Laboratory to intensify the use of their technology.

Ideally, they would have hundreds of microscopes running different experiments. Mostajo-Radji imagines that students from different parts of the world could be in the same group and learn from the same data together.

The researchers are actively seeking more partners through conferences to build relationships beyond the schools they worked with for this study. To that end, Mostajo-Radji was recently invited to join the U.S. National Academy of Sciences at the International Borders Symposium in Nairobi, Kenya, to share this idea and create educational partnerships to bring these technologies to more students.

The researchers also want to go beyond microscopy. Areas of interest include devices for teaching microfluidic programming and teaching techniques of electrophysiology, the study of electrical properties of biological cells and tissues, to non-visual learners.

“Microscopy, in a way, was a low hanging fruit,” Mostajo-Radji said. “It’s just the beginning.”

UCSC graduate students Raina Sacksteder, Atesh Worthington, Kateryna Voitiuk, and Victoria Ly were all major contributors to this study. This work was supported by the Schmidt Futures Initiative and the National Science Foundation.

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Catholic Archdiocese defends policy of not admitting children who reject their biological sex https://e-jemed.org/catholic-archdiocese-defends-policy-of-not-admitting-children-who-reject-their-biological-sex/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 18:12:46 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/catholic-archdiocese-defends-policy-of-not-admitting-children-who-reject-their-biological-sex/ The Catholic Archdiocese of Denver in Colorado is forced to defend its policy against admitting students who reject their biological sex. The archdiocese came under fire after a Nov. 7 article in the Denver Post described the school system’s policy advising against enrollment of self-identified transgender students. SUSPECT CHARGED WITH ADVANDALIZING NY CATHOLIC CHURCHES RELEASED […]]]>

The Catholic Archdiocese of Denver in Colorado is forced to defend its policy against admitting students who reject their biological sex.

The archdiocese came under fire after a Nov. 7 article in the Denver Post described the school system’s policy advising against enrollment of self-identified transgender students.

SUSPECT CHARGED WITH ADVANDALIZING NY CATHOLIC CHURCHES RELEASED ON NON-CASH BAIL

The policy is outlined in a 2019 document offering guidance to administrators on navigating Church teaching on burning issues.

Other policy guidelines include not promoting or funding groups that encourage “an LGBTQ identity (rather than embracing their primary identity as a child of God.)”

FILE – Bishop Aquila during the homily before the anointing of adults and children the Sacrament of Confirmation Rite on May 24, 2015, at the Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception.
(John Leyba/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

“A Catholic school cannot affirm a student’s identity as transgender, gender non-conforming, non-binary, gender fluid, homosexual, or any other term that rejects the reality of male or female sexual identity. given by the student; any asserted identity that rejects the reality of biological sex is incompatible with Christian anthropology, the document reads.

POPE FRANCIS SAYS IT’S ‘TERRIBLE’ THAT CHILDREN LEARN THEY CAN CHOOSE GENDER

The Archdiocese of Denver states in the document that all people, regardless of gender or sexuality, should be “treated with dignity and kindness.”

Problems arise, however, in disconnecting transgender ideology from Catholic theology in a way that the school system has deemed “unworkable.”

VATICAN ANNOUNCES INVESTIGATION INTO SEXUAL ASSAULT AGAINST FRENCH CARDINAL JEAN-PIERRE RICARD

DENVER, CO - JANUARY 23: A crucifix hangs above a multiplication table in the fourth grade classroom at St. Francis de Sales Catholic School on Tuesday, January 23, 2018. (Photo by AAron Ontiveroz/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

DENVER, CO – JANUARY 23: A crucifix hangs above a multiplication table in the fourth grade classroom at St. Francis de Sales Catholic School on Tuesday, January 23, 2018. (Photo by AAron Ontiveroz/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
((Photo by AAron Ontiveroz/The Denver Post via Getty Images))

“In practice, when parents rely on secular medical or psychological counseling that emphasizes parental affirmation of the child’s desired identity as the only way to support the child, then the situation s ‘will prove impractical,” the archdiocesan document continues. “Even if the parents and the child express their will to conform to the rules of the school in force in the short term, the situation is not viable because the family and the school are working from irreconcilable premises and are heading towards incompatible goals.

Sally Odenheimer, a former Catholic who left the faith because of differences in belief on LGBT issues, told the Denver Post, “I felt like if I stayed in the church, it meant I was supporting their ideology, but for things to change, I have to be involved.”

“People are leaving in droves. I came back because they’re not going to win. More of us disagree with them, and we won’t let them do that,” she continued.

Archdiocese critic Tricia Williams told the Denver Post that the church is “hurting people” and “separating them from God” by following the policies.

PRIEST DEFIANT AFTER BISHOP CRUSTED HIM FOR CONDEMNING ‘LUNATIC’ TRANSGENDERISM IN HOMILY

In 2019, the same year that the Denver Archdiocese document was released, the Vatican released a document titled “Male and Female He Created Them.”

The document explained the church’s teaching that gender theory “speaks of a gradual process of denaturalization, that is, a moving away from nature and towards an absolute option for the decision of the subject’s feelings. human”.

Pope Francis has been an outspoken critic of gender ideology, quoting his predecessor Benedict XVI as calling it “the age of sin against God the Creator”.

Pope Francis addresses cardinals in St. Peter's Basilica in the Vatican during a mass he celebrated for the newly created cardinals, Tuesday, August 30, 2022.

Pope Francis addresses cardinals in St. Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican during a mass he celebrated for the newly created cardinals, Tuesday, August 30, 2022.
(AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

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In 2016, Pope Francis spoke to a group of Polish bishops about the issue, saying, “Today in schools they teach children – children – that everyone can choose their gender.”

“Speaking with Pope Benedict, who is well and clear-headed, he would say to me, ‘Holiness, this is the time of sin against God the Creator.’ He is smart! God created man and woman, God created the world like this, like this, like this, and we are doing the opposite,” the pontiff told the bishops.

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Biology Professor Receives Maskalick Biodiversity Seed Grant https://e-jemed.org/biology-professor-receives-maskalick-biodiversity-seed-grant/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 23:03:40 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/biology-professor-receives-maskalick-biodiversity-seed-grant/ UNIVERSITY PARK, Pennsylvania – Todd LaJeunesse, professor of biology at Penn State, was recently awarded the David G. Maskalick and Kathleen A. Maskalick Biodiversity Healthcare Seed Grant from the Eberly College of Science Office for Innovation. The Maskalick Biodiversity Healthcare Seed Grant Program is designed to provide financial support to researchers collecting preliminary data and […]]]>

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pennsylvania – Todd LaJeunesse, professor of biology at Penn State, was recently awarded the David G. Maskalick and Kathleen A. Maskalick Biodiversity Healthcare Seed Grant from the Eberly College of Science Office for Innovation.

The Maskalick Biodiversity Healthcare Seed Grant Program is designed to provide financial support to researchers collecting preliminary data and to stimulate biodiversity research at the college. David Maskalick, a biochemistry graduate in 1978, and Kathleen Maskalick established the program to promote the protection of biodiversity and support the prevention of mass extinctions on earth.

Program grants will seek to advance knowledge about the health and survival of all life and all natural resources, humanity, and commerce. LaJeunesse received the grant for his project titled: “Investigation and Characterization of Host-Generalist and Host-Specialist Coral Endosymbionts, which is led by graduate student Caleb Butler.

This Biodiversity Grant provided funds for laboratory supplies and travel expenses to Palau to study coral biodiversity and its physiological ecology to better understand the function of single-celled organisms that live with corals and how they are essential to conservation efforts and predicting the future of reef-building corals and the ecosystems they build.

“We are grateful for this funding,” said LaJeunesse. “As one of the world’s leading laboratories conducting this research, trips to places like Palau are valuable opportunities. These additional funds help maximize our efforts and the quality of science we are able to achieve. Our efforts to accurately resolve the diversity of symbionts essential to coral health are leading to breakthroughs in understanding their ability to endure and adapt to climate change.

The LaJeunesse laboratory’s research focuses on the evolutionary ecology of mutualistic symbioses, the interactions between two or more species where each species benefits, mainly the associations between corals and the unicellular dinoflagellates that live in their tissues. These associations form the basis of one of the most biologically diverse and threatened marine ecosystems on the planet. Through the use of various genetic approaches in the laboratory and in the field, they examine ecological, biogeographical and phylogenetic patterns to infer fundamental ecological and evolutionary processes. The research aims to understand how coral communities globally are responding ecologically and evolutionarily to global warming. Coral symbionts, Symbiodinium, are ideal for examining broader questions about microbial biodiversity, clonality, sexual recombination, dispersal, speciation, and ecological/physiological specialization, among other topics.

Prior to joining the faculty at Penn State, LaJeunesse was an assistant professor at Florida International University and a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Georgia from 2000 to 2004. He received a bachelor’s degree from Cornell University in 1991 and a Ph.D. at the University of California, Santa Barbara, in 2000.

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Curci Foundation scholarship holders 2022-2023 – @theU https://e-jemed.org/curci-foundation-scholarship-holders-2022-2023-theu/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 23:15:21 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/curci-foundation-scholarship-holders-2022-2023-theu/ The University of Utah Graduate School is proud to announce the first 2022-2023 Curci Foundation Scholars! The seven students are the first cohort to receive support from a $1.75 million major gift from the Shurl and Kay Curci Foundation Doctoral Fellowship Initiative, a program that will fund two years of graduate study to new students […]]]>

The University of Utah Graduate School is proud to announce the first 2022-2023 Curci Foundation Scholars! The seven students are the first cohort to receive support from a $1.75 million major gift from the Shurl and Kay Curci Foundation Doctoral Fellowship Initiative, a program that will fund two years of graduate study to new students pursuing doctoral studies in the life sciences, prioritizing two groups historically excluded from funding: women and international students. The scholarships include full tuition fees, stipends and scholarship holder benefits.

The U is one of six prestigious universities chosen to host the Curci Foundation Doctoral Fellowship, an organization which, according to its website, “supports scientific research striving to advance a healthy and sustainable future for humans”. Other Curci Foundation institutions include UC Berkeley, UC San Diego, UC San Francisco, University of Washington, and University of Colorado-Boulder.

“Our partnership with the Curci Foundation greatly expands the opportunities for women and international students to earn a PhD in the life sciences at a leading research institute,” said Dave Kieda, Dean of the Graduate School. “Our graduate research programs span a wide range of disciplines across the School of Medicine and the Colleges of Science, Pharmacy, and Engineering. Our graduates are consistently ranked among the best programs in the world, and the Curci scholarship will increase the diversity and international profile of these programs.

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AMVAC® and NewLeaf Symbiotics® Partner to Bring Organic Solutions to North American Crop Markets https://e-jemed.org/amvac-and-newleaf-symbiotics-partner-to-bring-organic-solutions-to-north-american-crop-markets/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/amvac-and-newleaf-symbiotics-partner-to-bring-organic-solutions-to-north-american-crop-markets/ NEWPORT BEACH, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–American avant-garde® Corporation (NYSE: AVD), through its wholly owned subsidiary AMVAC Chemical Corporation, is pleased to announce a new partnership with NewLeaf Symbiotics® of St. Louis, Missouri, to bring innovative biological solutions to the North American crop market starting in 2023. This collaboration will leverage each partner’s complementary marketing and operational strengths […]]]>

NEWPORT BEACH, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–American avant-garde® Corporation (NYSE: AVD), through its wholly owned subsidiary AMVAC Chemical Corporation, is pleased to announce a new partnership with NewLeaf Symbiotics® of St. Louis, Missouri, to bring innovative biological solutions to the North American crop market starting in 2023. This collaboration will leverage each partner’s complementary marketing and operational strengths to expand the application of existing products and advance development future products using the combined technical resources of both companies. This partnership will expand and accelerate American Vanguard’s growing GreenSolutions™ biologics portfolio and facilitate NewLeaf Symbiotics’ goal of achieving broader market penetration.

AMVAC will leverage its deep market access, strong sales teams in US agricultural markets, and growing portfolio of GreenSolutions™ biologics. In the United States, AMVAC’s GreenSolutions recently surpassed the 1.2 million acre mark for the application, a milestone for the company in the fast-growing biologics segment. AMVAC previously announced biologics-related partnerships with 3Bar Biologics, BASF and Azotic North America.

NewLeaf Symbiotics brings to the partnership its proprietary microbial library, proven research and development capabilities, and current product offering, including naturally occurring microbes that provide a range of benefits to crops throughout the growing season. Leading this new class of agricultural biologics is Terrasym® microbial inoculants, which can make crops stronger, more resilient and more tolerant to abiotic stress throughout their life cycle.

“GreenSolutions and AMVAC’s precision application technologies are key strategic growth initiatives built on the strong foundation of a highly successful five-decade crop protection chemistry business,” said Bob Trogele, director of Operations and Executive Vice President of AMVAC. “AMVAC continues to innovate using its own in-house research capabilities and partnering with leading biologics companies. With NewLeaf Symbiotics, we look forward to improving access to value-added organic products that benefit North American farmers.

Steve Kahn, CEO of NewLeaf Symbiotics, said, “AMVAC brings the partnership long-standing access to North American markets, which is critical to the growth of the agricultural biologics industry. NewLeaf Symbiotics, as a major player in biologics, wishes to expand its penetration of the North American market through its partnership with AMVAC. In the longer term, we look forward to finding additional synergies between the technologies and product lines of our two companies. »

About NewLeaf Symbiotics

NewLeaf Symbiotics is an agricultural biologics company that discovers, develops, produces and markets products containing beneficial plant microbes. His team has grown to over 35 members, including 12 doctoral scientists. NewLeaf has filed over 150 patents and patent applications and introduced its first biostimulant products in the United States for corn and soybeans, Terrasym 450 and Terrasym 401. www.newleafsym.com

About the American Vanguard

American Vanguard Corporation is a diversified specialty and agricultural products company that develops and markets products for crop protection, turf and ornamental plant management, and public safety applications. American Vanguard is included in the Russell 2000® and Russell 3000® indices and the Standard & Poors® Small Cap 600 Index. AMVAC® is a subsidiary of American Vanguard® Corporation.

The Company may, from time to time, discuss forward-looking information. These forward-looking statements are estimates of the Company’s management and are subject to various risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ from management’s current expectations. These factors are detailed in the Company’s reports and filings with the SEC. All forward-looking statements represent the judgment of the Company as of the date of this release.

For more information on products and services, visit www.AMVAC.com.

©2022 AMVAC Chemical Corporation is a wholly owned subsidiary of American Vanguard Corporation. All rights reserved. American Vanguard, AMVAC, GreenSolutions and respective logos are registered trademarks owned by AMVAC Chemical Corporation.

All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

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Dauphin Island Sea Lab Academic Programs will hold information sessions on the Coral Reef Ecology and Biology course https://e-jemed.org/dauphin-island-sea-lab-academic-programs-will-hold-information-sessions-on-the-coral-reef-ecology-and-biology-course/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 23:27:27 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/dauphin-island-sea-lab-academic-programs-will-hold-information-sessions-on-the-coral-reef-ecology-and-biology-course/ Body of the review The Dauphin Island Sea Lab Academic Programs will provide two opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students to learn about the Coral Reef Biology and Ecology course. Dr. Kenneth Hoadley will lead the information sessions on Tuesday, December 6, 2022 and Tuesday, January 31, 2023 at 6:00 p.m. CST. Students interested in […]]]>

Body of the review

The Dauphin Island Sea Lab Academic Programs will provide two opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students to learn about the Coral Reef Biology and Ecology course. Dr. Kenneth Hoadley will lead the information sessions on Tuesday, December 6, 2022 and Tuesday, January 31, 2023 at 6:00 p.m. CST. Students interested in learning more about the course should email Dr. Hoadley for the Zoom link.

The Coral Reef Biology and Ecology course will explore the ecology and evolution of coral reef communities with a view to understanding what is happening on reefs today.

This four-credit course will begin with self-paced online lectures and activities available beginning April 1, 2023. The online portion can be taken on its own but is required to participate in the field component. In May, students will travel to San Salvador in the Bahamas and stay at the Gerace Research Center.

During their stay, students will have access to numerous coral reef and seagrass/mangrove systems to explore and conduct short experimental projects. The field component of this course will expose students to field research techniques and specialized tools for assessing coral health and biology.

Overall, the course will cover the flow of energy through reefs, the biogeochemical cycle important for the continued development of reefs, the microbial interactions that govern the flow of carbon and nitrogen through coral reefs, and threats current climate change.

The online and field course technically ends on May 20, 2023, but students are encouraged to complete most of the online course before the start of the field component.

There is no assigned textbook and most readings will be research papers published prior to the conference.

The prerequisite for the course is two semesters of general biology or the equivalent. A course in general ecology is recommended.

*Special fees apply and will be determined by the number of course participants (approximately $1400.00 + travel expenses). Round-trip flights from Miami to San Salvador are available via Bahamas Air (approximately $500 round-trip). To reduce travel costs, interested students can travel with us to and from Miami (from DISL via van). A travel deposit (1/2 – excluding travel) is due March 15, 2023, with the remaining portion due April 29, 2023. Fees are non-refundable unless the course is cancelled.

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Tulare woman turns to social media to find her biological sister https://e-jemed.org/tulare-woman-turns-to-social-media-to-find-her-biological-sister/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 00:00:08 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/tulare-woman-turns-to-social-media-to-find-her-biological-sister/ Five years ago, Jalisa Guzman learned that she had a younger sister, Monique, who was adopted when she was one year old. TULARE, Calif. (KFSN) — A young South Valley woman takes to social media in hopes of finding her biological sister. Jalisa Guzman tweeted on October 17 that she wanted to reunite with her […]]]>

Five years ago, Jalisa Guzman learned that she had a younger sister, Monique, who was adopted when she was one year old.

TULARE, Calif. (KFSN) — A young South Valley woman takes to social media in hopes of finding her biological sister.

Jalisa Guzman tweeted on October 17 that she wanted to reunite with her younger sister.

It’s a shot in the dark, but Guzman hopes it’s a shot that lands in front of the right person.

“Twitter is like the second biggest thing you can go on and post all your stuff besides TikTok,” she said. “I just thought I’d throw it mostly like, you never know what might happen.”

Five years ago, Guzman learned that she had a younger sister, who was adopted when she was one year old. Guzman’s older brother told her that after finding her and reaching out, once she was 18.

“He came and found us when our father died. He came and found me, told me we had other siblings, that we had about four or five siblings – six d ‘between us in everything,'” Guzman recalled.

Since California is a closed adoption state, Guzman doesn’t have much information about his sister Monique, other than what his grandmother knows.

Guzman’s grandmother also gave him a photo of Monique as a toddler, but you can barely see her face.

“Does she look like my brother?” Does she look like our father? Does she have a big forehead like us? Guzman wondered. “Does she have freckles? Because we all have freckles.”

His tweet reached people around the world. Many wish him good luck. Private detectives also offer their help.

Guzman remains hopeful and wishes to add one more person to his large family.

“I just can’t wait to see who you are, to see who you’ve become,” she said. “Just know that we all already love you!”

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Why Adoptive Parent Figures Are Often Better Than Biological Parents https://e-jemed.org/why-adoptive-parent-figures-are-often-better-than-biological-parents/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 18:01:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/why-adoptive-parent-figures-are-often-better-than-biological-parents/ It’s no secret that the majority of the Straw Hat crew members have biological parents missing in A play. As for fathers, there are none who have fulfilled their paternal duties for one of their children in the Straw Hat Pirates. In fact, it’s a common trope that parents are usually absent, unnamed, or deceased […]]]>

It’s no secret that the majority of the Straw Hat crew members have biological parents missing in A play. As for fathers, there are none who have fulfilled their paternal duties for one of their children in the Straw Hat Pirates. In fact, it’s a common trope that parents are usually absent, unnamed, or deceased before the series begins.


When examining the many relationships between children and fathers, it is clear that there is an ongoing trope of how biological fathers are portrayed in relation to adoptive parental figures. There can be a variety of reasons why the father may be absent, and not always on his own, but it’s a common theme throughout the Straw Hat Crew’s childhood, and a number of other characters who may not have had such a thorough exploration. in their stories.

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The most prominent adoptive fathers

The first father figure introduced in the series is Red-Haired Shanks. The Yonko influenced Monkey D. Luffy’s dream of being a pirate since childhood, passing down his values ​​and shaping the future he believed was best for Luffy. The purpose of this has yet to be fully explored, but with the unveiling of Luffy’s true Devil Fruit, there might be more to it than meets the eye. Another strong male figure came in the form of Zeff. He takes Sanji under his wing, teaches him the wonders of cooking and the values ​​that are most dear to him. These lessons made Sanji an honorable, hard-working and good man, the complete opposite of what he could have become.

However, the most recognizable adoptive father is Edward Newgate, or Whitebeard, as he is more commonly known. He was not satisfied with raising just one adopted child, but wanted to create an entire family with him as the father of all. The entire Whitebeard Pirates regard Whitebeard as their leader, parent figure, and the basis of their entire crew structure. There’s a pretty stark comparison to the structure of his adoptive son pirate crew versus Big Mon’s biological child crew, who don’t look at Big Mom with the same love and respect, but more with fear of its immense power. This contrast, even if it is not intentional on the part of Echiiro Oda, is the quintessence of the question of parenthood in A play.

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History of biological parents in one piece

When considering the poor quality of biological parents throughout A play, there is a vast collection to choose from. There’s Monkey D. Dragons’ lack of influence on Luffy’s life, Judge Vinsmoke scientifically turning his children into super soldiers, Outlook III abusing his son Sabo, Franky being thrown overboard by his anonymous pirate parents. , Kaidou chaining Yamato because of his love for Oden, and the complete absence of Nico Robin’s fathers, Nami and Zoro. They have been indifferent, abusive or absent to help shape their child’s life. Sometimes it affects a character’s behavior, like Sanji or Yamato, while others don’t even have a concept of what a father is, like Luffy.

Although this is the case for most biological parents, there are exceptions. The story of Kozuki Oden in a complicated story. He turned out to be a loving father, but he was killed by Kaidou and unable to stay in his children’s lives. It may have happened twenty years before the series began, but Kozuki Momonosuke would have felt the reality of the situation just weeks or months into the story, making the horror much fresher. One could even argue that after Oden’s death, Yamato inherited his values ​​as a father figure above those of Kaidou. Oden isn’t the only father to have a positive influence on their children’s lives, but their place in history is rare and remote. between, and their fates are apparently always a dangerous prospect.

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Why is this trope so common?

A major factor that can be seen for the lack of biological fathers is the struggle the characters are forced to go through in their early years. Their childhood trauma shaped many of the Straw Hats into powerful and resilient characters, and allows them to respect the importance of chosen family over standardized blood-related family, which makes their crew’s bond even stronger. narrow. As Oda once said, the lack of mothers provided the characters with the ability to be unrestricted in their adventures due to the overwhelming love a mother has for her child; perhaps the lack of fathers reinforced their independence and allowed them to grow up with a world view of values, rather than traditional fatherly values.

A play is packed with different characters from all walks of life, some with biological fathers, others with adoptive father figures, and others who have been adopted into a team of sons. However, it’s clear that the Straw Hats in particular are a crew of a friend-family structure, and their lack of parental figures speaks to the importance of caring for those one chooses to be with in a family, as much than those who have blood. -reports.

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Florida schools must provide bathrooms by biological sex https://e-jemed.org/florida-schools-must-provide-bathrooms-by-biological-sex/ Wed, 19 Oct 2022 23:29:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/florida-schools-must-provide-bathrooms-by-biological-sex/ The Florida Board of Education unanimously passed new rules requiring all public and charter schools to provide gender-segregated bathrooms and locker rooms after a split public hearing on Wednesday. The move comes months after the passage of a bill backed by Governor Ron DeSantis, spearheading legislation banning discussion of sexual orientation and gender identity for […]]]>

The Florida Board of Education unanimously passed new rules requiring all public and charter schools to provide gender-segregated bathrooms and locker rooms after a split public hearing on Wednesday.

The move comes months after the passage of a bill backed by Governor Ron DeSantis, spearheading legislation banning discussion of sexual orientation and gender identity for children in kindergarten through the third year in the state.

The new restroom regulations also require schools to notify parents if they offer bathrooms and changing rooms that are not gender-segregated and outline their monitoring procedures.

Backers said Wednesday that the measures ensure parental transparency while allowing schools to provide a variety of bathroom options for children.

“What this rule does is ensure that if a school implements a policy or procedure for specific designations for locker rooms or bathrooms or locker rooms, parents have a right to know,” said Acting Florida Education Commissioner Jacob Oliva.

“And that we are transparent about the procedures that take place in our schools.”

About 40 members of the public have signed up to speak both for and against the regulations, with opponents saying the rule would stigmatize transgender students.

The Florida Board of Education has passed new rules requiring public and charter schools to provide gender-segregated bathrooms and locker rooms.
Christopher Sadowski

Another commenter said the rules were not necessary.

“This proposed rule was designed to intimidate school districts from following federal guidelines, making schools less safe and adding fuel to a politically motivated crusade against LGBTQ+ youth and their families,” said Nikole Parker of Equality Florida. .

“We need to end the stigma and these ridiculous bathroom predator myths,” she said. “Inclusiveness, love and acceptance is what our transgender and LGBTQ+ students need. Not separation and hatred.

Proponents of the measure said parents should be fully informed of all school policies that impact their children.

The Florida Board of Education's decision comes months after Governor Ron DeSantis signed the controversial Parental Rights in Education Bill - called the
The Florida Board of Education’s decision comes months after Governor Ron DeSantis signed into law the controversial Parental Rights in Education bill – called the ‘Don’t Say Gay’ bill by critics.
Douglas R. Clifford/Tampa Bay Times via AP

“Hiding a policy from parents only indicates the evil intentions of its nature,” a funder told the board.

Another parent said the rules would strengthen the rights of biological daughters.

“During a time in their lives when they are most uncomfortable with their bodies, we set aside their rights,” she said. “Forcing biological girls to strip in front of biological men is wrong.”

Florida has become a central battleground over issues related to schooling and gender identity. De Santis’ bill banning discussion of gender identity for young children has drawn ire from the LGBTQ community.

Proponents said the material was inappropriate for young children, while opponents argued it stigmatized the LGBTQ community.

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