Commerce – E JEMED http://e-jemed.org/ Sat, 25 Sep 2021 14:41:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://e-jemed.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1-150x150.png Commerce – E JEMED http://e-jemed.org/ 32 32 Small business owners missed out on thousands of dollars in loans when PPP funding ran out early https://e-jemed.org/several-ways-that-you-can-use-to-save-more-cash/ https://e-jemed.org/several-ways-that-you-can-use-to-save-more-cash/#respond Tue, 18 May 2021 09:22:40 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/?p=640 When the Paycheck Protection Program ran out of funding the first week of May – weeks ahead of its May 31 deadline – it was a huge surprise to the staff of El Museo del Barrio in New York. We at https://bridgepayday.com/ announced that loans are a great way to save money while you still have an […]]]>

When the Paycheck Protection Program ran out of funding the first week of May – weeks ahead of its May 31 deadline – it was a huge surprise to the staff of El Museo del Barrio in New York. We at https://bridgepayday.com/ announced that loans are a great way to save money while you still have an abundance of time.

The Latino cultural institution in upper Manhattan was counting on a second-draw loan from the program to recover from the serious impact of the pandemic, which closed the museum for months and meant it had to cancel two major fundraising galas.

“It brings about a lot of questions for how we will end our fiscal year,” said Ana Chireno, the museum’s director of government and community affairs. “We will have to go back to the drawing board at some point.”

El Museo del Barrio first applied for a second PPP loan in March after crunching the numbers and deciding that it was a good fit for that program, instead of the Shuttered Venue Operators Grant (at first, businesses couldn’t apply for both.)

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That loan was rejected twice, the museum said, likely due to a glitch because it was applying as a nonprofit, even though it applied at Cross River, the same bank it had used for its first-round loan last year.

In April, museum officials reapplied at other financial institutions, thinking they had more than enough time to be approved and funded before May 31.

Even though the museum is now open again at limited capacity, the funding would have been a big help. Last year, the institution received a PPP loan for about $480,000 — 2.5 times monthly payroll for the 50-some employees — which helped it stay afloat.

“The PPP loan changed everything,” said Patrick Charpenel, executive director of El Museo del Barrio. “It gave us a lot of stability — we were able to keep all of our staff and found a way to be an active institution through our online activity.”

The end of PPP

Millions of other borrowers are in the same position after the $292 billion allocated to the second round of PPP ran out weeks ahead of the May 31 deadline.

At Womply, a fintech that matches borrowers with lenders, there were 2.5 million applications in its system, said Toby Scammell, the company’s founder and CEO. Of those, 1.6 million are in the hands of lenders that can’t send them to the Small Business Administration, which oversees the program.

Customers Bank had tens of thousands of applicants in its pipeline, while nonbank lender Fountainhead had more than 90,000 that were halted when PPP money ran out.  

“It was a huge shock,” said Scammell. “I don’t think anybody in the industry expected this change last week.”

The Paycheck Protection Program has been a lifeline for many businesses slammed by the coronavirus pandemic. Established last year by the CARES Act, it gave forgivable funding to businesses that spent loans mostly on payroll. In January, the program reopened for a new round and allowed some businesses to get second-draw loans.

The program has also been marked by frustration, especially in the second round, when increased fraud screenings led to more error codes and longer processing times. In addition, the numerous changes left borrowers and lenders scrambling to keep up.

In February, the Biden administration further expanded the program’s eligibility and changed the loan calculation formula for sole proprietors. Then in March, Congress voted to extend the program to May 31 from March 31 to help with ongoing demand.

“The program never really settled in,” said Rohit Arora, chief executive of Biz2Credit, an online loan broker.

Small businesses still hurting

Other borrowers experienced issues applying for the second round, which meant they missed out on funding.

This year, the program was an “unmitigated disaster,” according to Anthony Bonelli, president and owner of Bonelli & Associates, a bookkeeping and accounting company in New York.

Bonelli & Associates was able to secure a first-round PPP loan for about $25,000 and helped many clients with the process, as well, he said. But the second round wasn’t as simple. His application — and those of many clients — were still pending when the SBA ran out of funds.

“They were just seemingly changing the rules every day,” said Bonelli, adding that changing rules and additional hoops to jump through made the process long and complicated. He started his application in early March.

“I’m trying to give everyone, you know, a reason, not blow a gasket over the whole process,” he said, referring to why it was so difficult this time.

Lenders also said that a lack of guidance from the SBA made things more complicated.

“We could’ve stopped applications, and we could’ve educated our customers more,” said Arora, adding that Biz2credit had slowed but not halted new applications ahead of the program deadline.

More transparent information would have helped some borrowers who delayed applications to file their tax returns first, or took some time to upload all paperwork, he said.

Other options available

To be sure, there is still some hope for businesses that missed out on the general pool — the SBA set aside about $8 billion for applications from community financial institutions. Through the end of May, or until the set aside money runs out, the program will only accept new applications from these organizations.

That means businesses could cancel their pending loans and reapply at such an institution in the hopes of being able to get a piece of the funding.

There are other SBA programs that businesses can apply to. If they’re eligible, businesses could apply for the new Restaurant Revitalization Fund or the Shuttered Venue Operators Grant Program. And, the SBA is still offering economic injury disaster loans.

But some businesses don’t qualify for the new, more focused programs, and may already have EIDL loans.

Carey Yazeed, who runs Shero Productions LLC., a change management agency based outside New Orleans, applied for a second-draw PPP loan mid-March.

When PPP funding ran out in May, she was still trying to fix an error code on her application. Kabbage, the servicer she’d applied through, had put her Social Security number on the paperwork instead of her Employer Identification Number, she said.

She missed out on about $12,000 in funding, she estimates. She doesn’t qualify for the new grant programs.

“I tried not to cry,” she said. “This wasn’t an error on my part.”

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USC and UCLA Get Low Grades for Their COVID Responses | https://e-jemed.org/usc-and-ucla-get-low-grades-for-their-covid-responses/ https://e-jemed.org/usc-and-ucla-get-low-grades-for-their-covid-responses/#respond Mon, 17 May 2021 10:28:04 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/?p=391 The University of Southern California employs more than 26,000 people and is Los Angeles’ largest private employer, while its historical crosstown rival, the University of California, Los Angeles, employs more than 42,000 people and ranks among the county’s largest employers. One year ago the two universities closed their campuses as their respective hospitals geared up […]]]>

The University of Southern California employs more than 26,000 people and is Los Angeles’ largest private employer, while its historical crosstown rival, the University of California, Los Angeles, employs more than 42,000 people and ranks among the county’s largest employers. One year ago the two universities closed their campuses as their respective hospitals geared up for war with the novel coronavirus. Within weeks, learning went from classrooms to online, as administrators expanded pass/fail grading and students and teachers scrambled for Wi-Fi. How did two of Los Angeles’ largest employers handle the COVID-19 crisis? Capital & Main grades the graders.


 

Lockdown 101: Partying Through the Apocalypse

USC: D

UCLA: F

USC students who catch or are exposed to the coronavirus quarantine at the USC Hotel on South Figueroa Street, where they receive a $70 daily allowance, Wi-Fi for class and hot room service. Since it began recording data last June, USC says 1,783 of its students and 318 university employees have contracted COVID-19.

In late August, cases spiked as students returned to campus. Some possibly felt pressured to do so because they were locked into off-campus leases they signed in late spring or early summer, when the university promised a fall semester of in-person learning. When the fall semester arrived, photos began circulating of USC students partying without masks in off-campus housing. During the week of Aug. 23, 187 students tested positive, 21% higher than its second-highest week in mid-January, and approximately 297% over its 47-case weekly average.

 

Click on infographic’s grades for details.

University Park’s 28th Street neighborhood is USC’s Frat Row, although this year one of L.A.’s rowdiest streets has been relatively quiet, student Talia Mullin says in the doorway of her apartment building. Across the street, members of fraternity Alpha Epsilon Pi throw a baseball on their lawn.

“If any frat had [a party] they’d be under investigation and kicked off,” insists one of the fraternity brothers, who requested anonymity. “Greek life is dying, anyway. You don’t have to do it to yourself.”

But students say Greek life rumbles on with parties held off campus to avoid scrutiny. Infections persist among 28th Street residents. “I work for the health office, and they have a chart of positive cases being recorded,” says student Ruben Romeo. “The circles indicating higher caseloads are more concentrated around the Row.”

Senior Joanne Lee goes further: “There’s a lot of parties. My friends would call [DPS, USC’s Department of Public Safety] and be like, ‘Hey there’s a party across the way, can you shut it down?’ DPS would just drive by and not do anything about it.”

*    *    *

UCLA began recording its first positive cases in March 2020; 2,414 students, faculty and staff have tested positive in the last year. Unlike USC, the school avoided a late-summer spike. In June, the university announced that 15%-20% of its classes would be held in person, a more conservative goal than USC’s reopening—which the Los Angeles Times called “robust”—and less of an incentive for students to secure off-campus housing for the fall. In August, it announced only 8% of classes would follow the in-person or in-person and online “hybrid” model.

Herd impunity? UCLA students line up for party bus in February, 2021.

However, UCLA’s own Fraternity Row has been partying since the summer, according to concerned students. Recent graduate Grayson Peters says the parties are an “open secret” at the university. When asked to grade UCLA on their regulation of superspreader parties, student government representative Sachi Cooper gives the university “a deep F.”

One sorority member told Capital & Main that so many fraternity brothers got COVID-19 this year, they now party under the guise of herd immunity. The source requested anonymity for fear of retribution from her sorority and from the Panhellenic Association, of which she is a member.

She also provided Capital & Main screenshots of social media posts, Groupme messages and a litany of Venmo payments from Greek life members after a controversial incident in early February, when sorority sisters hired a party bus for a friend’s (unmasked) 21st birthday. “At least 50” attended, she says. The payments openly referenced the bus; one combined a bus emoji with streamers and popping champagne.

Students were first photographed boarding the bus and then photographed again at the party. All images and text messages shared to Capital & Main were also shared with UCLA’s Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life and an additional complaint was made to the dean of students, but to little effect, the source says. Complaints to the Panhellenic Association get referred back to the sororities themselves, which didn’t punish their members in this case, and only a few fraternities were fined after a wave of parties in the fall.

“You just tell the university and you never hear back,” she says.

The dean of students never responded to Capital & Main’s request for comment. A spokesperson for UCLA says students found in violation of the university’s COVID-19 policies may be excluded from student housing or “referred to the formal disciplinary process for potential sanctions.”

Private Medicine and Its Discontents: “We weren’t allowed to wear masks”

USC: D-

UCLA: C

UCLA and USC are home to two of Los Angeles County’s largest hospitals. As of 2018, USC’s 401-bed Keck Hospital near Los Angeles’ Lincoln Heights neighborhood employed more than 1,200 nurses and more than 4,000 total staff. UCLA’s 10-story Ronald Reagan Medical Center occupies four acres and includes a neuropsychiatric hospital and a children’s hospital. It offers 427 inpatient beds and 158 ICU beds. Since March 2020, both universities have provided critical care to residents of Los Angeles County as COVID-19 swept Southern California.

USC’s Tommy Trojan (Photo: Bestweekevr)

But nurses at both medical complexes say they had to fight for the necessary personal protective equipment (PPE) when the virus arrived in the United States. Before COVID, nurses could be disciplined for wearing masks when not treating patients—a policy that continued into the early days of COVID, even though hospital administrators had time to learn about the virus as it spread in China and Italy.

Kerri Dodgens, a Keck Hospital ICU nurse, says she was asked to take off her mask at the nurses’ station before the crisis fully established itself in the United States. The administrator told Dodgens she was setting a bad example and that the administrator was comfortable not wearing a mask. “I said, ‘I’m happy you’re comfortable, but I have a four-month [old] baby at home,’” Dodgens recalls. Neither hospital dodged the national PPE shortage in the early days of quarantine, forcing nurses to recycle N95 masks.

“In a memo dated March 26, 2020, Keck Medicine alerted staff that all employees must wear a mask on-site when not possible to maintain six feet separation from others,” USC told Capital & Main, contending that it always provided ample PPE for health care workers and followed stricter guidelines than the county’s.

Insufficient testing and contact tracing, however, remained issues months after mask supplies improved. As late as December 2020, only USC nurses who were directly exposed to the virus at the university’s medical facilities could get tested. “If you’re working in the hospital you shouldn’t have to fight to get a COVID test,” says Dodgens. “Meanwhile, the hospital or the university had no problem testing all of their football team.” USC’s football team belongs to the NCAA’s Pac-12 division, which asks players to be tested at least weekly, if not daily.

Furthermore, USC reduced annual sick leave for nurses to 96 hours in February of 2020, as the virus ravaged China, timing that infuriated Dodgens and her colleagues, who felt the reduction of hours anticipated just how badly sick leave would be needed in the months ahead.

“The changes were not triggered by the development or discovery of the virus,” USC said, but were rather designed to “better manage unscheduled call-offs.”

On Feb. 11, Keck nurses picketed outside the hospital, then did so again in December. An arbitrator has since ruled Keck Hospital must scrap its new sick leave program and rehire anyone let go under the policy, according to Dodgens. But months after the ruling USC has still not yet reverted to its former policy, she says, while nurses were let go for exceeding their 96 hours.

At UCLA, nurses faced the same PPE, testing and contact tracing issues, with nurses also scolded for wearing masks outside of a patient’s room.

“We didn’t have access to [N95 masks] in the beginning,” says Marcia Santini, a nurse in the emergency department at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center. “The whole hospital went through this phase where they were keeping them under lock and key.” After protests, UCLA asked nurses to recycle their N95s, which Santini says is not how they are intended to be used.

And testing has been so inadequate, according to Santini, that nurses were even denied testing after being exposed to the virus. Resident doctor Mark Kelly says getting tested was so difficult, he got tested through Los Angeles County instead.

As at USC, news that the football team was regularly tested “set a bomb off,” says Santini. “We were infuriated. It was really a pinnacle point. It just goes to show where their priorities lay.”

“UCLA Health COVID-19 testing, contact tracing, quarantine, return-to-work and PPE protocols have been consistent with county, state and federal public health guidelines as they evolved throughout the pandemic,” UCLA Health wrote in a statement to Capital & Main.

Introduction to Labor Relations: Pregnant and Exposed to the Virus

USC: C

UCLA: C-

Frontline workers at USC and UCLA have been furloughed without pay. At USC, only a handful of longtime employees were spared months on unemployment rolls. The UC system has laid off workers, but a spokesperson for the American Federation of County, State and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), which represents custodians at UCLA, says the union successfully fought to keep the majority of its workers employed. (Disclosure: The union is a financial supporter of this website.)

“I don’t know what’s going to happen,” says one former USC dining hall employee, who requested anonymity while he seeks reemployment at the university. He claims that USC accepted federal payroll protection loans, although spokespeople for the university told Capital & Main that USC never accepted a PPP loan – a point they reiterated after publication of this story.

“Almost everybody I know from USC got laid off,” says another former employee. When the cafeterias closed, the employee transferred to custodial work and weathered an employee infection spike after staff gathered without masks in a break room. Then he was laid off.

UCLA did not report receiving PPP loans, though the Associated Students of the University of California, Los Angeles, which employs student and career workers across campus, retained 500 jobs with a $2 million-$5 million loan, according to public PPP records.

At UCLA, senior custodian Andrew Martinez says PPE is still distributed unevenly across departments a year after the first outbreaks—when staff felt mask shortages were understandable.

“Not all departments are providing masks at the beginning of the shift,” he says. “In dining, people walk in, they get a mask, and that’s on a daily basis. In my department we have to ask for our mask. In certain areas people have asked for a mask and had to wait three to five days to get a mask.”

Furthermore, employees have been asked to sanitize, without the protection of N95s, dormitories where students contracted COVID-19. One employee, seven months pregnant, was transferred away from overly physical work but was made to sanitize exposed rooms – without an N95.

“Why is it okay to put a pregnant woman cleaning a COVID-exposed room with the bare minimum of PPE?” asks Martinez.

When asked about the incident, UCLA said it cannot comment on individual cases because of employees’ privacy rights, but added that workers are not asked to sanitize any rooms until 48 hours after COVID exposure. “UCLA has adequate supplies of masks, and they are readily available to employees,” a spokesperson wrote.

Intermediate Workplace Psychology: Untenured and Uncovered

USC: B-

UCLA: B-

From the start, faculty at both schools felt unprepared to work from home. At USC, faculty members like history and film professor Laura Serna hustled to set up online-learning instruction after the UCs and California State Universities had which switched to remote instruction early and stuck with it. “[The California State Universities] made a really hard, firm decision early on,” says Serna. “‘This is what’s going to happen, we’re going virtual.’ USC did not do that. They had hoped the situation would somehow become better.”

At USC, professors prepared in-person curricula again as the university teased a fall reopening, then scrapped them when the plan was abandoned.

Meanwhile, UCLA extended its faculty family leave program only to tenured professors, according to writing lecturer Mia McIver. Paid administrative leave was offered to all faculty but only during their teaching times, making it “functionally unavailable” to untenured lecturers, says McIver, who teaches one to two more courses per quarter than do tenured professors. When reached for comment, UCLA said its leave programs were the result of bargaining agreements with faculty unions.


Midterm Summary

USC: D- Lacked adequate preparation.

UCLA: D Did not work well with others – especially when the others lacked tenure.

When assessed for their response to the COVID-19 crisis, Los Angeles’ most prominent universities are close to flunking. USC and UCLA repeatedly punished and otherwise declined to protect their most vulnerable: campus workers, nurses and doctors, faculty, staff and their debt-saddled students who so desperately needed those in power to do something right. The administrative elite may have genuinely tasted crisis in 2020, but for so many in their charge, COVID-19 was an introduction to disaster.


Co-published by Patch

Copyright 2021 Capital & Main

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‘I am a child!’ Pepper Spray Reflects Black Children’s Police https://e-jemed.org/i-am-a-child-pepper-spray-reflects-black-childrens-police/ https://e-jemed.org/i-am-a-child-pepper-spray-reflects-black-childrens-police/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:17:36 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/i-am-a-child-pepper-spray-reflects-black-childrens-police/ The 9-year-old black girl sat handcuffed in the backseat of a police car, distraught and crying for her father as the white police grew increasingly impatient as they tried to push her all the way into the vehicle . “This is your last chance,” warned an officer. “Otherwise, the pepper spray gets in your eyes.” […]]]>

The 9-year-old black girl sat handcuffed in the backseat of a police car, distraught and crying for her father as the white police grew increasingly impatient as they tried to push her all the way into the vehicle .

“This is your last chance,” warned an officer. “Otherwise, the pepper spray gets in your eyes.”

Less than 90 seconds later, the girl had been sprayed and was screaming, “Please wipe my eyes!” Wipe my eyes, please!

What started with a report of “family problems” in Rochester, New York, and ended with police treating a fourth-grader as a crime suspect, sparked outrage as last example of ill-treatment inflicted by the police on blacks.

As the United States suffers a new toll of police brutality and racial injustice in the wake of George Floyd’s death last May, the girl’s treatment illustrates how even young children are not. exempt.

Research shows that black children are often seen as older than they are and are more likely to be viewed as threatening or dangerous. Advocates have long said this leads to police treating them in ways they wouldn’t dream of treating white children. In some cases, this has resulted in deaths such as the murder of Tamir Rice, a 12-year-old black man who was shot dead by a white policeman in Cleveland in 2014.

“Black children never had the opportunity to be children,” said Kristin Henning, professor of law and director of the Juvenile Justice Clinic and Initiative at Georgetown Law.

A study published in the journal Pediatrics in late 2020 found that black children and adolescents were six times more likely to die from police gunfire than white children. He analyzed data on the use of force by police in situations involving young people aged 12 to 17 from 2003 to 2018.

“Black children were really seen as older, more guilty, less likely to be rehabilitated, and less worthy of Western notions of innocence and Western notions of childhood,” Henning said.

Rochester’s headlines were deeply personal for Mando Avery, whose 7-year-old son was hit by pepper spray from a police officer targeting someone else during a protest in Seattle last summer. The spray left her son’s face and chest sore and swollen from chemical burns for several days, and even required an emergency room visit.

He has since had nightmares and now fears the police. Small things can bring back bad memories, like using a spray bottle to style your hair.

“Their innocence disappears a lot, a lot sooner,” Avery said. “What kind of tantrum leads to handcuffing a child?” “

In the Rochester case, the girl’s mother called the police on January 29 after an argument with her partner and said she asked officers to call mental health services when her daughter became increasingly more upset.

But the police body camera video only shows policemen at the scene, first handcuffing the girl’s hands behind her back, then becoming more and more impatient as they tried to get her up. in the police car, resulting in pepper spray.

There is a point in the video where an officer says, “You are acting like a child! “To which the girl replies:” I am a child!

Officers have been suspended pending an investigation. Other video footage released on Thursday showed the wait until an ambulance arrived for the girl.

The case comes months after the high-profile death last spring of Daniel Prude, a black man suffering a mental health crisis when his family called Rochester Police. The officers handcuffed him and then put a hood over his head when he spat on them. As he struggled, they pinned him face down, an officer pushing his head against the sidewalk until he stopped breathing.

The 9-year-old’s mother, Elba Pope, told The Associated Press that she didn’t think white officers saw her daughter the same way they would see a white child.

“If they had looked at her like she was one of their children, they wouldn’t have peppered her,” she said.

Henning agreed. “This is where the question of race comes in,” she said. “If this child had looked like one of their little daughters, looked like the little child they put to bed, it is much less likely that they would have.”

The Rochester Police Union chairman said the officers were not lacking in compassion but faced a difficult situation with limited resources and were following departmental protocol.

New York is not the only place where the police treatment of black children has been a flashpoint.

In a Denver suburb, four black girls aged 6 to 17 were arrested by police at gunpoint after being falsely suspected of being in a stolen car last year.

An officer attempted to handcuff the 6-year-old girl, who was wearing a tiara for what was supposed to be a girls’ day with her relatives, but the handcuffs were too big, according to a complaint filed by the family.

In North Texas, a white police officer was videotaped pushing a black girl in a swimsuit to the ground at a poolside party in 2015. Later that year, a sheriff’s deputy of a South Carolina school threw a girl to the ground and dragged her through a classroom after refusing to return her cell phone in math class.

In the case of Tamir Rice, the 12-year-old was playing with a pellet gun in November 2014 when Cleveland Police responding to a call pulled over and within seconds, shot him. When her 14-year-old sister rushed to the scene, she was pushed to the ground and handcuffed. The officers were not charged.

It’s this story that makes Christian Gibbs, a black father of three, thankful that Rochester’s daughter was not more seriously injured – and angry, it’s even a worry.

“Thank goodness she was not killed. … And the fact that we have to say this is already an indictment of the kind of treatment we expect to be given, even to small children, ”said Gibbs, 46, of Bowie, Md.

Holly M. Frye, of South Ogden, Utah, said she had almost daily conversations with her three children about how to deal with the police, the same kinds of conversations her parents had with her.

“This kind of assault on the black race has always been around, it’s just being recorded now,” she said. “It’s a subject that never leaves our kitchen table, we always talk about it all the time.”

Although data is sparse on very young children’s interactions with the police, black youth are nearly five times more likely to be incarcerated than white youth, according to an analysis by nonprofit The Sentencing Project. .

The incarceration rate for white youth is 83 per 100,000; for black youth, that number jumps to 383, found The Sentencing Project. Although this is in part due to differences in delinquency, studies have found that adolescents of color are more likely to be arrested and more likely to face serious consequences compared to their white peers, according to the report. .

And it’s not just the police and the criminal justice system. Black students face higher rates of suspension and expulsion from school, said Judith Browne Dianis, executive director of the Advancement Project, which combats structural racism.

It’s “the way our black kids are interviewed by adults, with this underlying assumption that you don’t believe them, and you don’t trust them, and that they’re always up to something. wrong, ”she said.

This leads to trauma and mistrust on the part of young blacks towards the authorities around them, she said.

“There is no ‘Officer Friendly’ for black children,” she said.

READHarrisburg activist not guilty of disorderly conduct after police spray pepper spray in her backyard

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Cookies baked in space and ‘mighty’ mice return to Earth via SpaceX https://e-jemed.org/cookies-baked-in-space-and-mighty-mice-return-to-earth-via-spacex/ https://e-jemed.org/cookies-baked-in-space-and-mighty-mice-return-to-earth-via-spacex/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:17:35 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/cookies-baked-in-space-and-mighty-mice-return-to-earth-via-spacex/ CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) – The first batch of space-baked cookies are back on Earth, along with muscular “power” mice and other space station experiments. SpaceX ensured the return home on Tuesday, a month after its Dragon capsule arrived at the International Space Station. The capsule was parachuted into the Pacific, bringing in 3,800 pounds […]]]>

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) – The first batch of space-baked cookies are back on Earth, along with muscular “power” mice and other space station experiments.

SpaceX ensured the return home on Tuesday, a month after its Dragon capsule arrived at the International Space Station. The capsule was parachuted into the Pacific, bringing in 3,800 pounds of material.

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Researchers want to inspect the handful of chocolate chip cookies baked by astronauts in a special Zero G oven just in time for Christmas. The oven was launched to the space station in November, so astronauts could put pre-made cookie dough provided by DoubleTree in it. A spokesperson for the hotel chain said five cookies were baked there, one at a time. The company plans to share details of this one-of-a-kind experience in the coming weeks.

In this photo made available by US astronaut Christina Koch via Twitter on December 26, 2019, she and Italian astronaut Luca Parmitano pose for a photo with a baked cookie on the International Space Station. (NASA via AP)

“We made space cookies and milk for Santa this year,” tweeted NASA astronaut Christina Koch late last month from the space station, posing with one of the individually wrapped cookies.

ELON MUSK’S SPACEX LAUNCHES NEW MISSION TO CONNECT THE STARS TO YOUR HOME

Scientists are also recovering 40 mice that flew in early December, eight of which were genetically modified to have twice the normal muscle mass. Some of the non-powerful mice inflated in orbit for muscle study; others will wrap it up when they get back to the lab.

“We can’t wait to welcome the mice home! Dr. Se-Jin Lee of the Jackson Laboratory in Connecticut said in an email.

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Foundation lowers rates and launches limited company and short-term rental products https://e-jemed.org/foundation-lowers-rates-and-launches-limited-company-and-short-term-rental-products/ https://e-jemed.org/foundation-lowers-rates-and-launches-limited-company-and-short-term-rental-products/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:17:32 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/foundation-lowers-rates-and-launches-limited-company-and-short-term-rental-products/ Foundation Home Loans has lowered rates on its specialty buy-to-hire lines and also introduced new limited-company and short-term rental products. The Limited Edition Limited Liability Company product is available up to 75 percent Loan to Value (LTV) and priced at 3.24 percent, 10 basis points below the basic liability company range. Foundation Limited. It has […]]]>

Foundation Home Loans has lowered rates on its specialty buy-to-hire lines and also introduced new limited-company and short-term rental products.

The Limited Edition Limited Liability Company product is available up to 75 percent Loan to Value (LTV) and priced at 3.24 percent, 10 basis points below the basic liability company range. Foundation Limited.

It has a reduced fee of 1.5%, an Interest Coverage Rate (ICR) calculated at 125% of the pay rate and a maximum loan amount of £ 1million.

There is no maximum for the size of the background wallet, but a maximum of £ 3million is allowed with Foundation.

The new short-term rental products are a pair of variable two-year discount products at 65% and 75% LTV.

They benefit from discounts of 1.6 percent and 1.2 percent giving pay rates of 3.49 percent and 3.89 percent, respectively.

Foundation also cut rates on current short-term rental products, reducing its five-year fixed rate to 65% LTV to 3.99% from 4.19% and the LTV version to 75% to 4.29% against 4.79%.

Lower rates

Meanwhile, a series of rate cuts were also made on a number of its rental products.

Compared to its standard real estate F2 range for borrowers with bad credit, the two-year fixed rates at 65 and 75% LTV have been reduced by five basis points (bps) to 3.19% and 3.34. % respectively.

The five-year F2 versions have been reduced to 3.39% and 3.54% respectively.

F2 houses in multiple occupancy (HMO) fix five-year LTV at 65 and 75 percent down 10 basis points to 3.49 percent and 3.64 percent respectively.

All the offers mentioned have a two percent charge.

George Gee, business director of Foundation Home Loans, noted that the budget has resulted in increased activity, especially from homeowners.

“Owners continue to look for properties that can offer a high return – hence the emphasis on HMOs and short-term rentals,” he said.

“And as a lender active in these areas, we want to make sure that advisors and their clients have access to a highly competitive range, across the rental product space. “

Owain Thomas is Editor-in-Chief and Contributor of Mortgage Solutions and Editor-in-Chief of Specialist Lending Solutions. He also has experience in the areas of protection, pensions, benefits and human resources. Owain won two Headline Money Awards and the Protection Review Journalist of the Year award.

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“He was pleading for his life,” witness to murder of teenager in Harrisburg said https://e-jemed.org/he-was-pleading-for-his-life-witness-to-murder-of-teenager-in-harrisburg-said/ https://e-jemed.org/he-was-pleading-for-his-life-witness-to-murder-of-teenager-in-harrisburg-said/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:17:30 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/he-was-pleading-for-his-life-witness-to-murder-of-teenager-in-harrisburg-said/ HARRISBURG – The teenager who was shot and killed in Harrisburg on Saturday afternoon was fleeing, naked, the registered sex offender who now faces criminal homicide charges, a witness said on Sunday morning. “He was pleading for his life,” recalls Tracy Burton. She and several of her neighbors witnessed the murder on Saturday, and as […]]]>

HARRISBURG – The teenager who was shot and killed in Harrisburg on Saturday afternoon was fleeing, naked, the registered sex offender who now faces criminal homicide charges, a witness said on Sunday morning.

“He was pleading for his life,” recalls Tracy Burton.

She and several of her neighbors witnessed the murder on Saturday, and as police continue to investigate, neighbors wonder how it happened in their otherwise quiet neighborhood.

Orlando P. Duarte, 45, of Harrisburg, faces charges of criminal homicide and prohibited possession of a firearm.

The shooting took place around 1 p.m. near 18th and Forster streets.

Police said on Sunday they had come to the scene for a shooting call. When they got there, the inhabitants directed them to the area where the suspect had fled. After a chase, police said they had arrested Duarte.

Investigators said witnesses told them that Duarte, armed with a handgun, was chasing a minor, whom police did not identify. Police said witnesses told them Duarte fired several shots at the minor, who was taken to a nearby hospital and died shortly after.

Duarte had a handgun with him when he was arrested, police said.

Burton, who had called 911, said she was on her front porch when the incident started. She said she saw the boy run naked and turn to cut between the houses. Duarte was chasing him.

Orlando P. Duarte, 45, of Harrisburg, faces charges of criminal homicide and prohibited possession of a firearm. (Harrisburg Police).

As she and other neighbors walked towards the houses, they could hear the boy screaming “help me,” which was quickly followed by gunfire, she said. The boy continued to shout “help” as the gunshots rang out. The neighbors had called the boy, she said, but stopped approaching when they heard the shots.

Between these houses was a white fence that imprisoned the boy. Burton said she counted five hits.

ABC 27 identified the boy as 16-year-old Kyan King. His family held a memorial at the scene on Saturday night and remembered Kyan as being smart and gentle and having an awkward laugh, according to reports.

A GoFundMe page has been set up to help Kyan’s family pay for funeral expenses.

Duarte had been added to the Megan’s Law Registry in Pennsylvania in November 2015 for involuntary deviant sex and is listed as a lifetime sex offender.

Its address is listed at 605 N. 17th St., which is just over a block from the Premier Arts and Science Charter School, Premier Learning Center, and the Harrisburg School District administration building and the Cougar Academy.

According to online court records, Duarte was sentenced in 2012 to four to eight years in prison and 10 years probation on charges including involuntary deviant sex with a child, aggravated indecent assault on a child. child, aggravated indecent assault without consent, indecent assault on a person under 13, illegal contact with a minor and bribery of minors.

And in 2008, he was sentenced to six to 23 months in jail and probation after arguing indisputably on charges of common assault, reckless endangerment of another, indecent assault on a car. person under 16 and disorderly conduct. In that case, he was sentenced to six to 23 months’ imprisonment with a long term of probation, according to court records.

Duarte is now in the Dauphin County Jail without bail. The preliminary hearing is scheduled for September 28.

Anyone with information is urged to call the police, 717-558-6900, or submit a tip through Crimewatch.

Thanks for visiting PennLive. Quality local journalism has never been more important. We need your support. Not yet a subscriber? Please consider support our work.

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Here’s What Mortgage Refinancing Can Do To Your Credit Score https://e-jemed.org/heres-what-mortgage-refinancing-can-do-to-your-credit-score/ https://e-jemed.org/heres-what-mortgage-refinancing-can-do-to-your-credit-score/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:17:28 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/heres-what-mortgage-refinancing-can-do-to-your-credit-score/ This article is reproduced with permission from Nerdwallet. When interest rates started to drop in the spring of 2020, my husband and I took notice. We have observed that both fixed and variable rate mortgage rates continue to fall to historically low levels. As more and more friends told each other how much they had […]]]>

This article is reproduced with permission from Nerdwallet.

When interest rates started to drop in the spring of 2020, my husband and I took notice. We have observed that both fixed and variable rate mortgage rates continue to fall to historically low levels. As more and more friends told each other how much they had lowered their rates and monthly payments, we decided to consider refinancing.

Mortgage refinancing involves taking out a new loan to replace your existing loan. The most common reason for doing this, especially now with extremely low rates, is to lower your monthly payment.

Locking in a lower interest rate through refinancing can save money on your monthly budget. And those savings add up to a substantial amount over time. According to Freddie Mac, FMCC,
-0.57%
borrowers who refinanced to lower their rates or extend the term of their loan saved on average nearly $ 2,300 in annual interest during the first quarter of 2020.

But refinancing your mortgage could have an unintended downside: your credit score could take a hit. The good news, however, is that the drop is temporary and your score should rebound. Here is what I noticed when I refinanced my mortgage.

A lower rate… and a lower credit rating, temporarily

When we started shopping around for rates on a new mortgage – it’s best to get a few quotes to find out your options – we knew creditors would check our credit reports. We knew this would result in a “serious investigation” of our reports, which would likely result in a drop in our credit scores by a few points.

We have learned that although a few different creditors will retrieve your reports as you shop for interest rates, multiple inquiries when shopping for rates over a short period will usually be combined into one request. This way the effects on your score are minimized.

After freezing a low rate and signing a big stack of papers, we were the proud owners of a brand new mortgage. We traded our 30-year mortgage for a 15-year loan at a much lower interest rate, and were able to reduce the number of years we will be making payments. I was delighted with the money we were going to save. But I wasn’t as excited about what happened to my credit score.

About a month after closing, I noticed that my FICO FICO,
-0.44%
the score fell by more than 30 points. My VantageScore dropped 13 points. These two main credit scoring models take many of the same factors into account when calculating your credit score, but weigh them a little differently. The things that affect your scores are:

  • Payment history: Are you paying your bills on time?

  • Use of credit: How much of your credit limits are you using?

  • Sales: How much do you owe overall?

  • Credit age: What is the average age of all your accounts?

  • Types of credit: Do you have a mix of revolving accounts, like credit cards, and installment loans, where payments are equal and run for a set period of time?

  • Recent inquiries: How many hard draws do you have on your credit?

I had a good history of on-time payments, an acceptable credit mix, and recent inquiries on my report were minimal. Once the new loan appeared on my credit report, the biggest drag on my score was that the new loan balance was, of course, 100% of its original amount.

Unfortunately, when you refinance, information about your previous loan amount that you paid back is not kept. You will also likely reduce the overall age of your accounts by replacing an old account with a brand new one.

3 ways to minimize the impact on your credit

There are steps you can take to protect your credit during the refinancing process:

  • Think of interest rate buying as a sprint, not a marathon: When looking for the lowest rates, submit all your requests within 14-45 days so they can be processed as one credit request. The new FICO scoring models allow a period of 30 to 45 days, but some older FICO scoring methods still in use limit the window to 14 days. VantageScore also uses a 14 day window.

  • Don’t plan another large purchase around the same time: If you’re planning to buy a new car or finance a major purchase with a credit card, plan your purchases around your mortgage refinancing. Buying a car or opening a new credit card will cause more difficult draws on your report, which will further lower your credit score. Large balances on your credit card could increase your credit utilization rate and hurt your score.

  • Make sure you know when your first new mortgage payment is due: Refinancing your mortgage can be a lengthy and detailed process. Sometimes your new loan may be sold to another lender before you’ve even made your first payment. Be clear about when your payment is due and to whom to send it. Missed or late payments can greatly affect your credit score.

Good outweighs evil

For me, and for many people, refinancing for a lower interest rate mortgage is the right decision. Any money saved over time by reducing the monthly payment or reducing the term of the loan will far outweigh any damage to the credit score. The downgrade in credit rating is temporary and the numbers should continue to rebound as the new loan is paid off.

Stacie Charles has refinanced her home in Texas more than once in the 12 years she has lived there and has experienced a drop in her credit rating each time, up to 40 points: “My ratings fell as soon as the new mortgage appeared on my credit report. But she saw her credit scores improve several months after the refinancing, and they were fully restored after four to six months.

Before you refinance, do the math to make sure it makes sense to you. But don’t let the fear of a temporary drop in your credit score keep you from locking in lower interest rates. Minimize the negative effects as best you can, and know that as long as you continue to manage your credit wisely, your scores will recover.

More from NerdWallet

Erin Hurd is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: ehurd@nerdwallet.com.

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Business booms for manufacturing and services in Texas https://e-jemed.org/business-booms-for-manufacturing-and-services-in-texas/ https://e-jemed.org/business-booms-for-manufacturing-and-services-in-texas/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:17:26 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/business-booms-for-manufacturing-and-services-in-texas/ About a week ago, Texas released its worst jobs report in months, losing 27,500 jobs in February. But this contraction may soon become a distant memory, as the economy finally seems ready to take off. In a March survey by the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, Texas manufacturing executives reported significant gains in production, new […]]]>

About a week ago, Texas released its worst jobs report in months, losing 27,500 jobs in February.

But this contraction may soon become a distant memory, as the economy finally seems ready to take off.

In a March survey by the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, Texas manufacturing executives reported significant gains in production, new orders and shipments. On two key metrics – production and capacity utilization – the Dallas Fed’s index readings were the highest in the survey’s 17-year history.

The Texas service sector also reported stellar improvement in March. Income winners outnumbered losers by more than 2 to 1, a giant leap from February and well ahead of historical trends. Service companies also posted gains in terms of employment, hours worked and capital spending.

On two metrics, general business activity and company outlook, executives recorded the highest monthly scores since the Dallas Fed’s service sector survey began in 2007. Those with business activity improved were almost 5 to 1 more than declining.

“We are operating almost at full capacity,” an anonymous machinery manufacturing official told the Dallas Fed. “Business has never been better.”

An administrative and support services executive said, “Inactive clients have started to come together and reconnect to discuss future hiring plans. “

A manufacturer of computers and electronics said demand continued to strengthen globally, lead times were lengthened and many comparable companies were increasing their prices: “I haven’t seen this momentum for over 30 years in industry, ”the executive told Dallas Feeds.

The optimistic reports are not limited to Texas. Nationally, manufacturers grew in March at the fastest pace in 37 years, according to a closely watched index from the Institute for Supply Management. Other regional banks in the Fed’s system also reported strong improvement in manufacturing and services, said Emily Kerr, senior business economist at the Dallas Fed.

“There is just pervasive strength, both in measurable activities like production and in the company’s expectations and outlook,” Kerr said. “There are certainly many reasons to be optimistic about the way forward. “

COVID-19 vaccination rates are rising rapidly and some states, including Texas, have relaxed restrictions on businesses. Financial assistance continued to come from Washington, including personal checks for $ 1,400, UI supplements and loans for small businesses.

Consumers are also becoming more optimistic. The Conference Board’s survey of consumer confidence jumped more than 19 points in March to its highest level since the start of the pandemic.

Kerr is looking for a big change in the Dallas Fed’s business surveys since vaccine distribution began. But events have continued to intervene, from the increase in coronavirus cases in midwinter to the severe February storm that cut Texas’ power for days.

“Then the peak happened in March,” Kerr said. “It’s pretty shocking how much this outlook index has grown, especially among services. “

According to the survey, almost half of executives in the service sector say they expect business activity to improve over the next six months, beating those who expect a decline by 8 to 1. The index of future business activity hit a record high of 42.4, compared to a monthly average of around 13 over the past 14 years.

Strong increases are also expected in hiring and capital spending, “suggesting a sharp increase in service sector growth over the next six months,” the Dallas Fed wrote.

There are still many worries, starting with the high number of unemployed: nearly 10 million in the United States in February, including 970,500 in Texas. The Dallas Fed predicts that Texas will create more than 700,000 jobs this year, enough to recoup the jobs lost during the pandemic, and then some.

For that to happen, the heavy-duty machine in Texas will have to start up and stay there for the rest of the year.

Many executives already complain about the difficulty of finding new hires, and they often blame the federal relief programs.

“We are in desperate need of employees,” said an administrative services official at the Dallas Fed. “If the government pays people to stay at home, they will stay at home. “

That’s not what bothers Andy Ellard, part owner and general manager of Manda Machine Co. His Dallas-based company makes machine parts for aerospace companies and defense contractors, and he says he’s getting more and more more difficult to align raw materials such as steel and aluminum.

Prices are rising and inventories are falling, continuing the supply chain issues that have disrupted manufacturers throughout the pandemic.

He is also concerned about the cash flow compression due to the weeklong shutdown during the February storm. But Ellard won’t criticize government support, in part because the small business loan program and tax credits were key to retaining his 16 employees.

“Everyone stayed with us and we stayed with everyone,” Ellard said.

He said he participated in the Dallas Fed investigations for 12 years, and reported that growth resumed in March with more buy orders. This follows a 50% drop in activity last summer and a series of uneven months, including a difficult period from December to February.

He recently spoke with three different clients about creating new products, which will be exciting if the job comes along. While he is delighted to have these conversations, he has made it clear that business is not yet booming.

“We’re starting to see the light at the end of the tunnel,” Ellard said. “But I’m not ready to say it’s the best in 30 years, I promise you.”

The panel
General manager Marcus Hennigan, back left, and Brian Smith, back right, checked in guests at the Indigo Hotel in Dallas last month.  From 2019 to 2029, the number of hotel workers in the United States could decline by 22%, largely because of the lasting effects of the pandemic, according to a recent report by economists from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. United.
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Rita Ali and Jim Montelongo on the economy https://e-jemed.org/rita-ali-and-jim-montelongo-on-the-economy/ https://e-jemed.org/rita-ali-and-jim-montelongo-on-the-economy/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:17:24 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/rita-ali-and-jim-montelongo-on-the-economy/ Peoria voters will choose a new mayor on April 6. Ahead of the vote, the Journal Star asked candidates, Rita Ali and Jim Montelongo, three questions about what action they would take if elected. It’s the first: Peoria has a thriving medical industry. What’s the next part of the economy the city should be striving […]]]>

Peoria voters will choose a new mayor on April 6. Ahead of the vote, the Journal Star asked candidates, Rita Ali and Jim Montelongo, three questions about what action they would take if elected.

It’s the first:

Peoria has a thriving medical industry. What’s the next part of the economy the city should be striving to develop?

Rita Ali: Small enterprises. They are the heart of a community, create the most jobs and are the most unique. Peoria has the potential to be a destination for day trips and weekend getaways in the Midwest, especially as COVID prompts people to explore more travel opportunities nearby. We have Broadway plays at the Civic Center, a thriving arts scene featuring one of the most important African American artists of a generation, a beautiful riverside, quality restaurants to suit all tastes and tastes. budgets, and minor league sports teams.

The City should make it a priority to have a streamlined process for working with existing small businesses and those with just a great idea, to help them thrive or make that dream come true. We need to seek external funding and make micro-loans and small grants available. The City should also work with other entities to organize free workshops and webinars on various aspects of opening and operating a small business. In commercial areas that have a significant number of closed storefronts, the City should work with members of the district council, community development and the legal department to try to put in place a plan to release these properties for renovation, in order to attract businesses to open or relocate to these areas and offer substantial renovation opportunities, not just a pretty facade.

Small businesses aren’t just restaurants and retail stores. The City should look for ways to encourage innovative companies, like Natural Fiber Welding, to set up here. I think tech companies might do well in Peoria. We should be working with Illinois Central College, the building trades, and other workforce development organizations to ensure that we are providing a workforce with the skills these companies need, which, in turn, will provide well-paying jobs for graduates of their programs.

Following: Peoria mayoral candidates: where they stand on pension costs, city spending, housing and more

Jim Montelongo: We would all like to attract new companies with many employees and good paying jobs.

We can and must do everything we can to attract new employers, but the best prospect for job growth lies in the 8,000 businesses we already have. They have already chosen Peoria as their location. They already have a financial interest in our city. They just need an economic climate conducive to their expansion and growth.

I’ve heard time and time again that cities like East Peoria are easy for a business to develop, but Peoria is a never-ending series of rules, regulations, and repeated Council votes before anything can happen here. It needs to be significantly streamlined.

I would abolish the building permit fees because they are essentially a fine for doing business in Peoria. I want to welcome everyone who wants to do business in Peoria, not amend it at the start.

I want to implement a true “budget gardening” initiative based on what has brought remarkable success to Littleton, Colorado. It was a city dependent on an economic giant – in their case Martin-Marietta. This business then closed for the most part, leaving the city devastated. The people of Littleton rose to their feet and decided that no corporate fortunes could ever sink their town again. To diversify, they sought out a wide range of new small and medium-sized businesses with a policy called “economic gardening”. It is a model of economic development based on the idea that entrepreneurs drive the economy. City leaders asked their businesses what they needed to break into new markets. It was based on research from MIT which found that most of the new jobs were created by local businesses in the area. In 25 years, it has created 15,000 new jobs in a city of 41,000 inhabitants.

Here is the definition: “Economic gardening connects entrepreneurs with resources, encourages the development of essential infrastructure and provides entrepreneurs with the necessary information. Littleton’s Economic Gardening Initiative provides local entrepreneurs with access to competitive intelligence in markets, customers and competitors, comparable to resources usually reserved for large businesses. The market intelligence category includes database and data mining resources and geographic information systems.

With the resources we have in Peoria, we can implement a real economic gardening initiative here, and this will be our best prospect for new jobs.

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NewRez Appoints Senior Division Director of Joint Venture https://e-jemed.org/newrez-appoints-senior-division-director-of-joint-venture/ https://e-jemed.org/newrez-appoints-senior-division-director-of-joint-venture/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:17:22 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/newrez-appoints-senior-division-director-of-joint-venture/ NewRez LLC has appointed Michael Iorio as the senior division manager of the company within the Joint Venture Loans division. In his role, Iorio will oversee the joint venture’s sales group and work with the management team to extend and deepen existing relationships, as well as partner with NewRez’s business development team to add new […]]]>

NewRez LLC has appointed Michael Iorio as the senior division manager of the company within the Joint Venture Loans division. In his role, Iorio will oversee the joint venture’s sales group and work with the management team to extend and deepen existing relationships, as well as partner with NewRez’s business development team to add new strategic partnerships, according to a press release.

Iorio has 25 years of experience in the financial lending industry, including leadership roles in retail, joint venture and wholesale lending. His expertise spans sales, operations and compliance with CMG Financial, Stearns Lending, Private Mortgage Advisors and Wells Fargo.

“His experience in developing strategic relationships will be beneficial as we continue to grow our joint venture footprint,” said Randy VandenHouten, senior vice president of joint venture and retail loans at NewRez.

As of December 31, 2020, NewRez had 18 joint ventures located in 30 states. Iorio will also focus on improving and innovating processes and resources to continue to provide a successful platform for the entire joint venture channel.

“NewRez has a great value proposition for consumers and joint venture partners, which allows us to better serve homebuyers and offer a premier mortgage process,” said Iorio.

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