Ecology Jobs – E JEMED http://e-jemed.org/ Sat, 25 Sep 2021 14:42:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://e-jemed.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1-150x150.png Ecology Jobs – E JEMED http://e-jemed.org/ 32 32 Activists call for declaring mangrove forests in Buddu and Bundal Islands protected https://e-jemed.org/activists-call-for-declaring-mangrove-forests-in-buddu-and-bundal-islands-protected/ https://e-jemed.org/activists-call-for-declaring-mangrove-forests-in-buddu-and-bundal-islands-protected/#respond Sat, 25 Sep 2021 01:00:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/activists-call-for-declaring-mangrove-forests-in-buddu-and-bundal-islands-protected/ Calling on the Sindh government to declare the mangrove forests of the Buddu and Bundal Islands protected to avoid ecological disaster, environmental activists and civil society have said the mangrove forests of the Indus Delta are crucial for save Karachi, Thatta, Sajawal, Badin and other areas from seawater intrusion, and they are especially needed for […]]]>

Calling on the Sindh government to declare the mangrove forests of the Buddu and Bundal Islands protected to avoid ecological disaster, environmental activists and civil society have said the mangrove forests of the Indus Delta are crucial for save Karachi, Thatta, Sajawal, Badin and other areas from seawater intrusion, and they are especially needed for Karachi given the recent heatwave phenomenon and the city’s sensitivity to tsunamis and cyclones.

Petitioners Yasir Hussain and Ahmad Shabbar, and their lawyer, Jibran Nasir, at a press conference at the Karachi Press Club on Thursday, said it was very disturbing news for the people of Karachi when, the he federal government led by Tehreek-e-Insaf last year introduced the Pakistan Island Development Authority Ordinance 2020 with plans for commercial construction on Buddu and Bundal Islands.

They said the federal government, in its myopia, claimed the plan would create 125,000 jobs without taking into account the 200,000 members of the fishing community who would lose their livelihoods due to the adverse effects on the environment. It is estimated that 800,000 people will likely be displaced as a result of this project.

“Additionally, in order to build a city on the islands, the builders will fill (which they call ‘salvage’) parts of the sea using sand from other parts of the seabed. This will cause an irreversible change in the ocean channels which will have direct but unpredictable effects on the route to Port Qasim etc. leading to further economic damage. “

Speakers also discovered that the Sindh government, which opposed the federal government’s plans for the commercial use of Buddu and Bundal, had its own secret and malicious plans to use the islands for the same purpose.

“The government of Sindh had managed to do this secretly by issuing a notification in 2010 which, although at first glance appeared to declare all mangrove forests in the Indus Delta as protected, further inspection revealed that he had deliberately omitted Buddu and Bundal. islands on the list, ”said one speaker. As a result, their petition also raised questions for the Sindh government in light of this notification, they said.

“The mangroves of the Indus Delta are of international importance because the Indus Delta is covered by the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands and is on WWF’s Global 200 list of Important Ecological Sites,” Shabbar said.

However, environmental activists have lamented that despite its importance, the mangrove cover has become significantly depleted over the past four decades and it is only now that restoration efforts have been made.

The petitioners also posed questions to the Sindh government in light of this notification. While the PIDA order expired within the first three months of the aforementioned petition, the provincial government “used delaying tactics and did not submit a response despite a 10-month delay,” Nasir said.


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September 24 – Science Central sets up an exhibition on the subject of manufacturing | Fwbusiness https://e-jemed.org/september-24-science-central-sets-up-an-exhibition-on-the-subject-of-manufacturing-fwbusiness/ https://e-jemed.org/september-24-science-central-sets-up-an-exhibition-on-the-subject-of-manufacturing-fwbusiness/#respond Fri, 24 Sep 2021 19:15:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/september-24-science-central-sets-up-an-exhibition-on-the-subject-of-manufacturing-fwbusiness/ Science Central’s brand new permanent exhibit is designed to get kids thinking about manufacturing while having fun. The new exhibit, Make It, was unveiled on September 24 at the Children’s Science Museum, 1950 N. Clinton St., Fort Wayne. The exhibition is made possible by a contribution from the Don Wood Foundation. Parents MonTe Stevenson and […]]]>

Science Central’s brand new permanent exhibit is designed to get kids thinking about manufacturing while having fun.

The new exhibit, Make It, was unveiled on September 24 at the Children’s Science Museum, 1950 N. Clinton St., Fort Wayne.

The exhibition is made possible by a contribution from the Don Wood Foundation.

Parents MonTe Stevenson and Jaliyah Rice’s children Kali Stevenson and MonTe Stevenson II were the first to try out the new exhibit. Kali flicked a lever that operated a die and pressure roller to pop out a piece of shiny paper cut into a shape. Then Mum Jaliyah helped her take the paper and fold it into a box while the MonTes in turn took the cutting die.

Part of the goal of the exhibit, Martin Fisher, Executive Director of Science Central, said, “For kids like them to look around, see what they can do when they grow up. What field do they want to enter? What jobs do they want to work? What jobs are there in this field here and this is representative of the types of jobs they are likely to have when they are a little older. “

The exhibit will also remind adults that most things, like many items of clothing and badges, are not cut by hand. “They’re all machines. It’s all die-cut. It’s not somebody sitting there with scissors, cutting out the shape of the name tag. These are things that we use and do. we need and need day in and day out. And all because of machining, machines, cutting. “

The Don Wood Foundation – formerly the 80/20 Foundation Trust – takes its name from Don Wood, who founded 80/20 in 1989 in Fort Wayne before moving to Columbia City in 1995. Its T-slot aluminum bars that can be used to do anything anyone can imagine. Its slogan is “The Industrial Erector Set”.

The name of the company may not ring a bell outside the region, but its products are seen all over the country. Fisher recalled reporting the T-slot products made in Fort Wayne on exhibits in Houston to other museum executives.

Wood was “a late-life entrepreneur,” said Laura Macknick, the first executive director of the Don Wood Foundation. He “definitely built from scratch what is today 80/20. Certainly I think he would be delighted to see young minds captivated and interested in technology and manufacturing, and considering that there might be have opportunities for them to become our next generation of entrepreneurs. “

The 80/20 Foundation Trust is focused on strengthening manufacturing in the region, Macknick said after the event. “We recognize that to meet the workforce needs of these manufacturers, we must cultivate interest in the young minds of our children in the community.”

It does this with things like the Make It exhibit, taking kids on tours of manufacturing plants, and supporting vocational and technical education through scholarships.

The Stevenson-Rice family had the chance to cut the exhibit ribbon with Fisher; Macknick; Geoff Paddock, member of Fort Wayne 5th District City Council; and Andrea Geyer, vice-chair of the board of directors of Science Central.

Planetarium, other works

Science Central has a number of ongoing activities including the installation of a planetarium project. Bertsch-Frank & Associates (BFA), a survey and construction engineering company in Fort Wayne, planned to perform laser scans in the part of the building that will house the 1,500-foot planetarium.

It will feature a star ball from the former planetarium of the University of Saint-François and a new digital system. The star ball has thousands of tiny holes – some the width of a human hair – and a very bright light underneath. Light shines through the holes and projects starlight onto the curved ceiling of the planetarium. The modern digital system will show the sky from our position on Earth, as well as images of our solar system and beyond.

Design Collaborative of Fort Wayne is the project architect on the west side of Science Central. 3D space imagery will allow detailed development of architectural designs.

Barring labor and supply shortages, Fisher expects the more than $ 2 million project to be operational in the third quarter of 2022. It is the second largest capital project. since the museum opened in 1995 in the former City Light and Power Plant, next to Science on the Sphere – a 6-foot-diameter sphere of the Earth that projects the colors of the oceans and rainforests as they appear would appear from space or may show the moon or Mars.

Another major project coming up in November will be the complete reconstruction of its demonstration theater. With the exception of the exterior “It will be a better, more modern, level bleacher seat.” It will be designed for the museum’s “Special Abilities Days” so that people with physical disabilities can easily access it.

Other work at the museum includes installing new terrariums for its various creatures, including snakes and iguanas. “We have professional quality; they’re actually made just for us, ”Fisher said.

Over the next six months, the museum will have a giant Lite-Brite-inspired exhibit called Pixel Pegs in the early learning area called Kids Central and the museum will also have a digital artwork exhibit that will allow children to explore. ‘enter their drawings into a system that transforms the static images into a cartoon.

The museum will undergo a complete overhaul with several exhibitions on the theme of ecology and the environment placed on the lower level. Exhibits currently downstairs will be moved upstairs, where many of the earlier exhibits will be removed.

The temporary exhibitions planned for next year are ecology for January-May; mazes, games and puzzles and geometry for the summer; and health, nutrition, diet, food and exercise for fall through winter vacation.

Prior to COVID-19, museum staff would educate 130,000 to 140,000 unique visitors through site visits, school outreach programs and distance learning conferences. After being closed for three months in 2020, the rest of the year saw very light traffic which finally started to pick up last summer.


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Industry, fossil fuels and sustainability in the shadow of climate change – Interview with Kate Gaertner. https://e-jemed.org/industry-fossil-fuels-and-sustainability-in-the-shadow-of-climate-change-interview-with-kate-gaertner/ https://e-jemed.org/industry-fossil-fuels-and-sustainability-in-the-shadow-of-climate-change-interview-with-kate-gaertner/#respond Fri, 24 Sep 2021 14:04:31 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/industry-fossil-fuels-and-sustainability-in-the-shadow-of-climate-change-interview-with-kate-gaertner/ Windmill next to the coal-fired power station in the docks of Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Getty Images Kate Gaertner’s mission is to help companies determine carbon neutral pathways. She is the founder and CEO of TripleWin Advisory, a sustainable development consultancy, and the author of Planting a seed: three simple steps for a sustainable lifestyle. What […]]]>

Kate Gaertner’s mission is to help companies determine carbon neutral pathways. She is the founder and CEO of TripleWin Advisory, a sustainable development consultancy, and the author of Planting a seed: three simple steps for a sustainable lifestyle.

  1. What is the relationship between sustainability and climate change?

A sustainability mindset recognizes that our current way of life and operation no longer serves the inhabitants of our planet, human and non-human. Likewise, sustainability recognizes that we have and continue to overtax, over-pollute and over-extract the Earth’s resources and that the mindset has to stop and stop now.

Sustainability as a strategy has long been adopted in the minds of consumers as “reduce, reuse and recycle”. This nickname simplifies the concepts of industrial ecology that must be implemented by companies to reduce and neutralize the impact of industry on the environment: only use existing (non-virgin) materials within a supply chain, reducing the flow of materials through our economic system and returning materials to their natural place: biological return to Earth and technical / synthetic return to the manufacturing system.

At the heart of any strategic approach to sustainable development is a total rejection of the use of fossil fuels for 100% renewable energy. Sustainability is a desired outcome because if embraced fully, completely, and holistically, we as humanity can stop and reverse climate change and support the smooth functioning of the planet for present and future generations. Sustainability is both a response to climate change and our only way to get through it.

2. The challenges of climate change have hit literally many in 2021, with record heat, forest fires and floods destroying property and lives. Can these events be attributed to global warming?

Scientists know with near 100% certainty that human-induced climate change creates the conditions for extreme weather events to occur more frequently, but attribute extreme weather events one-to-one to the increasing warming trend line climate over the years and decades is not a relationship that is easily proven.

To be “attributed” is to be caused by. As a layman who understands and trusts science, yes, global warming causes more frequent and intense extreme weather events than if they happened in the absence of climate change.

3. What is the main obstacle for Americans to adapt to a greener lifestyle, such as driving an electric vehicle or installing solar panels?

The technologies that power electric vehicles and residential solar panels must be made affordable for the average American family, with or without incentives. Ford’s announcement of its 2022 Lightning EV F-150 truck, which offers 300 miles of range, seconds as a back-up generator and sells for under $ 40,000, is brilliant.

Allowing individuals to haul large loads long distances and use their personal vehicles to power lawn equipment, electronics or their home during a power outage should make this truck technology a no-brainer for most. Americans.

Personally, if I could treat everyone to a ride in my BMW i3 EV car and show them how fast and fun it is to drive, I’m sure I could win the hearts and minds of most people. between them.

4. Are you optimistic about the promises of business and industry to become carbon neutral by 2050?

I am cautiously optimistic and must take this position; My mission is to help companies determine their own carbon neutral pathways.

The world’s largest companies understand that they must and can move away from fossil fuels to get 100% renewable energy. And they are! Today more than 300 companies are committed to sourcing exclusively from renewable energies. These are critical commitments and absolutely necessary transitions.

It is no small feat that the Biden / Harris administration has set the national goal of achieving net carbon neutrality by 2050 and progressing 50 to 52% towards that goal by 2030, in nine years. This is a strong and positive signal that will impact industries, sectors and businesses of all sizes. Businesses could benefit from strong legislation at national and state levels. The SEC could cause a radical change in state-owned enterprises if it required disclosure of GHG emissions and climate risks.

5. Which major US companies are leading the way in sustainability?

Great strides are being made in the IT industry, specifically calling HP with its 100% renewable energy target by 2035 and material circularity with ink printer cartridges; Microsoft

MSFT
for the establishment of internal carbon pricing and the commitment of $ 1 billion to the Climate Innovation Fund to stimulate technological investments in clean energy solutions; and Autodesk

ADSK
take the initiative to achieve 100% renewable energy in its facilities, cloud services and employees working from home, and achieve net carbon neutrality by the end of 2021

General Mills

GIS
and Whirlpool set important precedents for setting science goals (SBTs) consistent with Paris Climate Agreement targets of 1.5oC and 2oC respectively, across their enterprise value chains.

General Motors

DG
goes in the right direction by declaring its intention to set sustainable development goals for its total carbon footprint by the end of this year and to become carbon neutral by 2040.

Best buy

BBY
tackles environmental impacts at several critical levels, including setting a target to reduce its carbon footprint by 75% by 2030, collecting and eliminating more than 160 million pounds of household waste (2020) and in particular, by setting water use targets of 15% reduction in use by 2025.

Finally, Procter & Gamble

PG
is also working at multiple levels with a particular note on its water conservation efforts by reducing water consumption in manufacturing facilities by 20% per unit of output and achieving a difficult but achievable milestone of 100% waste to be buried in manufacturing in 2020.

6. The oil and gas industry and conservative politicians often say that one of the best reasons to protect the fossil fuel industry is the thousands of jobs it supports. What can you tell me about this?

New scientist in 2019, “long before” the Biden / Harris administration renewed the government’s focus on renewable energy, said the renewable energy sector in the United States employed nearly 9.5 million people, or more 10 times those used by the entire fossil fuel industry. These figures refute any argument to protect and continue to subsidize the fossil fuel industry.

The infrastructure to support the distribution and use of fossil fuels, including pipelines, oil rigs, oil refineries and the like, was built a long time ago. Systems to support the use of fossil fuels exist and require only ongoing maintenance; they are “well-oiled” machines, to use an expression adapted to the industry.

But renewable energy systems are newer technologies requiring varying levels of investment; development of new innovations; manufacturing of systems; continuous construction of infrastructure; support distributed storage systems; marketing and sales to market, evolve and increase technology adoption; and facilities at all levels: municipal, industrial, commercial and residential.

Each of these “business areas” to build a large-scale renewable energy sector requires different areas of expertise, sets of intellectual knowledge and a skilled workforce. The renewable energy industry must evolve rapidly, within 30 years, to meet the goals of the Paris Climate Agreement of keeping the global temperature increase below 2oC. Rapid growth combined with a lot to accomplish means huge opportunities, which equates to a lot of jobs.


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The Field Isn’t Just About Trees, It’s About People – Port Alberni Valley News https://e-jemed.org/the-field-isnt-just-about-trees-its-about-people-port-alberni-valley-news/ https://e-jemed.org/the-field-isnt-just-about-trees-its-about-people-port-alberni-valley-news/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 19:00:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/the-field-isnt-just-about-trees-its-about-people-port-alberni-valley-news/ In a year when COVID-19 once again dominated much of the news, events in British Columbia have inextricably drawn public attention to the province’s forests. Wildfires have burned much of the interior of British Columbia, leaving people fearful of the loss of lives, homes and livelihoods. The province has evolved towards shared decision-making with indigenous […]]]>

In a year when COVID-19 once again dominated much of the news, events in British Columbia have inextricably drawn public attention to the province’s forests.

Wildfires have burned much of the interior of British Columbia, leaving people fearful of the loss of lives, homes and livelihoods. The province has evolved towards shared decision-making with indigenous peoples, an essential but complex change in forest management. While waiting for forest policy changes, people are also wondering about job security in many rural communities. And the protests of old growth, native to Vancouver Island, revealed a passionate divide between urban and rural residents, young and old, indigenous peoples and even among the registered forestry professionals tasked with caring for the forests. throughout British Columbia.

Sometimes forestry is not about trees, it’s about people. Almost all British Columbians have values ​​about the forest, be it spiritual, environmental or economic. When forestry activities go against people’s values, emotions run high, fingers are pointed and blame is cast aside.

Planning and maintaining healthy and sustainable forests is the role of licensed forestry professionals. Like dentists, engineers, accountants and physicians, forestry professionals are regulated. Registered forest professionals in British Columbia have university or college degrees, have completed a two-year internship, passed a series of licensure exams, and meet professional codes and standards.

Forest professionals, however, do not have a single monolithic view of forest management or the way we use forests. They have a wide range of opinions, based on science, training and practical experience.

Given the complexity of old-growth forests, it is natural that forestry professionals have differing opinions. But the debate around old-growth forests is not really about the science and practice of professional forestry; it is about the choices the landowner has made about how and for what purpose forests are used.

With 94 percent of British Columbia’s forested land owned by the state, the provincial government has a responsibility to understand what the public expects from its forests and to set priorities for the use and management of these lands. forest. Regardless of their personal views or those of their employer, forest professionals are required to obey the law, adhere to public forest policies and uphold the overriding public interest when making recommendations or decisions regarding forest management. .

Determining what British Columbia’s forests will or will not be used for is not a simple or small task. There are a multitude of voices calling for their preferred solutions to be imposed by governments. How do governments balance different values ​​and demands? What should be privileged?

A growing number of British Columbians want the use of forests to reflect their current and future interests, regardless of past uses. It’s just; priorities need to be reset as societal values ​​change. But forests are complex ecosystems. As we have seen in the past, sometimes decisions based on the public wishes of the day have unintended consequences in the future.

Our history of forest fires is a good example. For years, British Columbia followed a forest fire suppression policy where fire was seen as something bad to avoid and resources were used to contain and contain fires to protect not only neighboring communities, but the trees themselves.

Today we know better; fire is an integral part of the ecology in many forests in British Columbia.

Governments are responsible for setting the rules and policies that reflect society’s desires for the forests of British Columbia today. The informed voices of registered forest professionals are essential in helping the public and government decision-makers understand the ecological consequences of any policies put in place to address these desires.

forestry


Christine Gelowitz, RPF, is the CEO of the Association of BC Forest Professionals.  (PHOTO SUBMITTED)

Christine Gelowitz, RPF, is the CEO of the Association of BC Forest Professionals. (PHOTO SUBMITTED)


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Ohio State Colleges and Vocational Schools by the Numbers https://e-jemed.org/ohio-state-colleges-and-vocational-schools-by-the-numbers/ https://e-jemed.org/ohio-state-colleges-and-vocational-schools-by-the-numbers/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 01:58:55 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/ohio-state-colleges-and-vocational-schools-by-the-numbers/ The Ohio State graduate programs with the most enrollment are arts and sciences, engineering, nursing, education and human ecology, and social work. Credit: Amal Saeed | Lantern File Photo The economic recovery from the pandemic has started and graduate students have more job prospects than they did a year ago. While holders of graduate degrees […]]]>

The Ohio State graduate programs with the most enrollment are arts and sciences, engineering, nursing, education and human ecology, and social work. Credit: Amal Saeed | Lantern File Photo

The economic recovery from the pandemic has started and graduate students have more job prospects than they did a year ago.

While holders of graduate degrees earn more on average than holders of lower-level degrees according to Social SecurityThe final salary depends on the industry, among other factors, said Scott Kustis, director of industrial relations with the Arts and Science Center for Career and Professional Success, in an email.

Meet a career coach; get a mentor; explore as many professional development opportunities as possible while studying; develop a professional network; join student chapters of industry professional groups, ”Kustis said in an email.

The Ohio State graduate programs with the most enrollment are arts and sciences, engineering, nursing, education and human ecology, and social work, according to the Ohio State Analysis and Reports. website.

Arts and Sciences

Ranked # 1 in Graduate Student Enrollment, Arts and Science Graduate Programs understand master’s and doctoral programs in fields of study such as psychology, chemistry, and political science. In the fall semester of 2021, there were about 2,300 graduate students enrolled in arts and science programs, only a handful fewer than in fall 2020, according to the latest enrollments from Ohio State. report.

While there are many areas within the college, overall they haven’t experienced the same enrollment drops as undergraduate and community college programs due to the pandemic, said Brad Hershbein, Senior Economist and Communications Advisor at the WE Upjohn Institute for Employment Research. .

“People who enter graduate programs are usually a bit further along in life,” Hershbein said. “They tend to have a little higher income and otherwise somewhat shielded from a lot of forces that were reducing enrollment.”

Graduates with a master’s degree in psychology typically to win about $ 53,000 per year five years after graduation, while graduates with a master’s degree in physical sciences earn about $ 59,000 and graduates with a master’s degree in communication, journalism or a related field on average approximately $ 68,000 per year.

Compared to the annual average earnings of graduates with only a bachelor’s degree in these fields, master’s graduates earn on average $ 15,000 more per year.

Engineering

With the second highest number of enrollments, the graduate program currently has 1,700 engineering graduates. students in the state of Ohio.

According to the US Census Bureau, while engineering students with a bachelor’s degree can expect to to win approximately $ 75,000 five years after graduation, graduates with a master’s degree in engineering to win nearly $ 88,000 per year.

Hershbein said the degrees that were in demand before the pandemic will likely still be needed in the future, so engineering students will likely find it relatively easy to find employment.

Feeding with milk

Enrolling 1,067 students, the third largest graduate program this semester is in Nursing. According to United States Census Bureau, health professionals with graduate degrees earn on average nearly $ 20,000 more per year than those with only a bachelor’s degree.

Students graduating in health fields have another advantage, as the demand for people trained in health fields is high, Hershbein said.

According to projections from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, five of the 20 fastest growing industries from 2019 to 2029 will be in the health care and social assistance sectors.

Education and human ecology

The graduate program in Education and Human Ecology enrolled 1,024 students this semester, and on average, graduates with a master’s degree in education earn about $ 10,000 more than their peers with just a bachelor’s degree, according to the analysis and reports. website.

The education market is expected to grow at a rate of nearly 4% per year through 2025, according to a report of Research and Markets. The demand for skilled labor in education is increasing, well, especially in K-12 education.

Social work

Ohio State’s fifth most popular graduate program is social work, with 1,013 students enrolled. Social work enrollments also saw one of the highest growth rates between the fall 2020 and fall 2021 semesters, at around 14%, according to the analysis and reports. website.

While the pay gap between a bachelor’s and master’s degree in social service professions is smaller than others, at around $ 8,500, Hershbein said these professions were in high demand before the pandemic.

“A lot of these jobs have been lost during the pandemic because a lot of them take place in person,” Hershbein said. “There just isn’t a lot of money that has been distributed because of a lot of cutbacks. “

Demand for these professions is expected to rebound once funding is restored, Hershbein said.


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The past biological world and its environment through research https://e-jemed.org/the-past-biological-world-and-its-environment-through-research/ https://e-jemed.org/the-past-biological-world-and-its-environment-through-research/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 10:35:53 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/the-past-biological-world-and-its-environment-through-research/ © Jon Bilous Conrad Labandeira explains the mission of the Department of Paleobiology at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, to foster scientific and public understanding of the past biological world and its environment through research The Department of Paleobiology is one of seven academic research departments located at the National Museum of Natural […]]]>
© Jon Bilous

Conrad Labandeira explains the mission of the Department of Paleobiology at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, to foster scientific and public understanding of the past biological world and its environment through research

The Department of Paleobiology is one of seven academic research departments located at the National Museum of Natural History, the largest unit of the Smithsonian Institution, in Washington, DC, United States. The Department’s mission is to foster scientific and public understanding of the past biological world and its environment through research, use of its collections, and awareness raising through a variety of educational programs and exhibitions.

The main responsibility of the twelve researchers in the department is to provide an active research program in the areas of their expertise, to assemble, conserve and study the fossil collections at the Museum and elsewhere, and in the process of exhibiting extraordinary fossils in public spaces at the Museum and train future generations of paleontologists.

United States National Fossil Collection

The Department of Paleobiology houses the United States National Collection of Fossils which is available for study by all researchers. The department is home to over 40 million fossil specimens which include Cambrian trilobites of worldwide distribution; the early Permian flora of Texas representing extinct lines of seed plants; Upper Cretaceous dinosaurs, pterosaurs and plesiosaurs; insects and plants from the Eocene Green River of the western interior; and drill cores of tiny, deep-water foraminifera from the recent past.

This record of the history of life representing the past 3.6 billion years consists of 64% microfossils and invertebrates, 18% plants and 18% vertebrates. Some of these fossils are archived in the Department’s database and consist of 800,000 specimen records of which 135,000 are primary and secondary type materials.

Department researchers

The staff of the Department of Paleobiology is primarily organized by research, collections, staff support and administrative functions. As of mid-2021, the research function consists of 12 researchers / curators, three retired staff, 12 affiliated research staff and six postdoctoral fellows. The collections management staff includes 11 technical managers. Support staff have a variety of jobs that include the fossil preparation laboratory with five preparers, three other technical specialists and a fund manager. About 55 staff make up the paleobiology department, of which 33 (60%) are substantially involved in research.

Researchers in the department work with many colleagues in institutions around the world in a collaborative and interdisciplinary manner, involving field and laboratory work to address fundamental questions about the history of life. To this end, the Department’s research is organized into four sections: micropaleontology, paleobotany, invertebrate paleontology and vertebrate paleontology.

Research in micropaleontology

The micropaleontology section includes research on planktonic and benthic marine foraminifers, studied respectively by Dr Brian Huber and Dr Martin Buzas (Emeritus) from the Cretaceous and Cenozoic deposits. Dr. Huber’s research focuses on the use of foraminifers to determine Cretaceous climate and oceanography, the response of foraminifers to the Cretaceous-Paleogene biotic crisis 66 million years ago, and the biogeography of foraminifers and biostratigraphic correlations over the same time interval.

Paleobotanical studies

Paleobotanical studies involve Dr William DiMichele, who examines plants from the Paleozoic and early Mesozoic, and Dr Scott Wing who studies plants from the Late Mesozoic and Cenozoic. Dr. DiMichele reconstructs the morphology and lifestyle of extinct plant lines and analyzes their paleoecology and role in Paleozoic systems to determine long-term ecological and evolutionary patterns. Dr. Wing studies the systematics of flowering plants (angiosperms) to determine the Late Mesozoic and Cenozoic paleoclimate of the Rocky Mountain region.

It also uses plant morphological characteristics and taphonomy to understand plant ecologies during major events such as the Cretaceous-Paleogene ecological crisis and the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum.

Paleontology of invertebrates

Invertebrate paleontology is covered by the five researchers / curators Drs Selina Cole, Stewart Edie, Doug Erwin, Gene Hunt and Conrad Labandeira, who collectively study a wide range of invertebrate groups ranging from crinoids (feathered stars, water lilies) , bivalves (clams), gastropods (snails), ostracods (seed shrimp) and arthropods (mainly insects); periods from the late Precambrian to the recent; and a variety of quantitative approaches.

Dr. Cole studies the systematics, paleoecology, and macroevolution of Paleozoic crinoids that were much more abundant and diverse than today, and analyzes patterns of paleoecology and community extinction. Dr Edie examines the evolutionary history of bivalves, in particular their patterns of lineage diversity and structural changes in body shape over time. Dr. Erwin examines macroevolutionary patterns of diversification of Cambrian metazoans, the evolutionary history of gastropods from the Paleozoic to the Triassic, and the Permian mass extinction 252 million years ago and its recovery in the Triassic. A long-term study by Dr Erwin is behind the innovation and its detection in the fossil record.

Dr Hunt specializes in identifying macroevolutionary patterns in lineages of deep-sea ostracods, a group of small bivalve crustaceans. The quantitative techniques used by Dr. Hunt for ostracods have been applied to other groups of fossils, such as mammals. Dr Labandeira examined the fossil history of arthropods and their associations with other organisms, especially plants, by examining the damage they leave on leaves. He examined the diversity of fossil insects, the evolution of insect mouthparts, and the role of major ecological events in insect history.

Vertebrate paleontology

Vertebrate paleontology is very present in the department and is covered by Kay Behrensmeyer, Matthew Carrano, Nicholas Pyenson and Hans Sues who study vertebrates ranging from the Permian to the most recent. Dr Behrensmeyer analyzes the paleoecology of terrestrial environments, particularly the Late Cenozoic (Neogene) of Pakistan and East Africa, the latter often associated with studies of ancient hominids.

A second interest is the taphonomy of vertebrates, in particular studies involving the decomposition and disarticulation of carcasses. Dr Carrano studies large-scale evolutionary models in dinosaurs and particularly focuses on the systematics of basal theropods; of further interest is the reliability of the dinosaur fossil record. Dr Pyenson studies Cenozoic and late marine mammals, particularly whales, providing primary data on the ecology of marine mammals and other marine tetrapods, including Mesozoic lineages. Dr Sues examines the early history of tetrapods, particularly amphibians and reptiles, including the earliest lineages of dinosaurs.

A diverse community

The Department of Paleobiology represents a diverse community of researchers, curators, collection managers, technical staff, post-docs, students, visiting scientists and administrative staff who support the mission statement of the Smithsonian Institution. to ensure “the increase and dissemination of knowledge”. Although the department has significantly downsized over the past two decades, it remains a vibrant center of fossil record investigative activity.

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EABL to stop using Kenya Power as part of Sh22bn plan https://e-jemed.org/eabl-to-stop-using-kenya-power-as-part-of-sh22bn-plan/ https://e-jemed.org/eabl-to-stop-using-kenya-power-as-part-of-sh22bn-plan/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 02:45:15 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/eabl-to-stop-using-kenya-power-as-part-of-sh22bn-plan/ Companies EABL to stop using Kenya Power as part of Sh22bn plan Wednesday 22 September 2021 EABL factory in Ruaraka, Nairobi. PHOTO FILE | NMG By VICTOR RABALLAMore from this author Summary KBL chief executive John Musunga said the brewer aims to disassociate itself from Kenya Power by 2030 as part of a 22 billion […]]]>

Companies

EABL to stop using Kenya Power as part of Sh22bn plan


EABL factory in Ruaraka, Nairobi. PHOTO FILE | NMG

Summary

  • KBL chief executive John Musunga said the brewer aims to disassociate itself from Kenya Power by 2030 as part of a 22 billion shillings plan.
  • The brewer’s investments come amid a warning from Kenya Power that some of its industrial customers – who account for around 68.31% of its sales revenue – are gradually shifting to clean solar power.

East Africa Breweries Limited #ticker: EABL (EABL) plans to stop using Kenya Power’s electricity to power its Kenyan factories, stepping up businesses’ transition to solar power generation.

KBL chief executive John Musunga said the brewer aims to disassociate itself from Kenya Power by 2030 as part of a 22 billion shillings plan.

The brewer’s investments come amid a warning from Kenya Power that some of its industrial customers – who account for around 68.31% of its sales revenue – are gradually shifting to clean solar power, dealing a further blow to his finances are already in decline.

EABL, owned by Diageo, aims to generate at least 9.3 megawatts at its plant in Ruaraka and 2.4 megawatts from solar power in Kisumu as part of the 100% transition to green energy .

“We are committed to providing 100% renewable electricity by 2030 at all of our facilities. The 22 billion shillings investment also includes biofuel production, ”Musunga said.

“This is already partly implemented at our factory in Kisumu, with 10 percent of our current electricity needs being met by renewable energy from solar power,” he added.

The multibillion shillings investment also includes the production of biofuels that will help the brewer reduce carbon emissions by 95% (around 42,000 tonnes of carbon per year) and create more than 900 direct and indirect jobs throughout. of the supply chain.

Mr Musunga said the investment will be rolled out early next year, which is Diageo’s biggest investment in climate action in sub-Saharan Africa.

KBL joins a list of companies, universities and factories that have turned to solar photovoltaic (PV) systems to provide electricity for internal use to ensure reliable supply and lower operating costs .

Large energy consumers such as Africa Logistics Properties (ALP), Mombasa International Airport, the International Center for Insect Physiology and Ecology (Icipe) have recently commissioned solar power units on their properties. .

Large energy consumers such as Africa Logistics Properties (ALP), Mombasa International Airport, the International Center for Insect Physiology and Ecology (Icipe) have recently commissioned solar power units on their properties. .

The big switch to solar power by heavy consumers has pushed Kenya Power into a deeper dilemma over excessive power generation.

Generators have increased production amid reduced consumption by homes and businesses in the wake of Covid-19.

Payments for unused electricity are a cost passed on to consumers through a binding purchase clause contained in contracts signed between the government and the power producers, requiring Kenya Power to purchase the agreed amount of electricity regardless of be the need.


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Houses in Cornwall can be built on Merritts Hill, Illogan Fields https://e-jemed.org/houses-in-cornwall-can-be-built-on-merritts-hill-illogan-fields/ https://e-jemed.org/houses-in-cornwall-can-be-built-on-merritts-hill-illogan-fields/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 08:51:07 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/houses-in-cornwall-can-be-built-on-merritts-hill-illogan-fields/ The advisers agreed that an entirely new site which had been considered as a buffer zone between two settlements is suitable for housing. An application for approval in principle had been submitted to Cornwall Council for the construction of five bungalows on land off Merritts Hill, Illogan. In principle, permit applications are limited to considering […]]]>

The advisers agreed that an entirely new site which had been considered as a buffer zone between two settlements is suitable for housing.

An application for approval in principle had been submitted to Cornwall Council for the construction of five bungalows on land off Merritts Hill, Illogan.

In principle, permit applications are limited to considering only whether a location is suitable for development and the amount of development permitted. All technical aspects of the proposals would be provided and discussed at a later date.

A number of councilors raised concerns, but were warned by officers that if turned down for the wrong reasons, they could appeal – and recalled the “massive costs” paid by the council after a precedent call “dramatically failed”.

Cornwall City Council’s West Sub-Region Planning Committee considered the request when it met on Tuesday and agreed to grant permission in principle.

The decision was made despite concerns about the impact any development could have on the region’s ecology and close access to the site.

Planning officers had recommended councilors to grant permission saying it was considered “rounded” because there is development on three sides of the site with the other side bordered by a hedge.

They also said the site was considered large enough for a five-house development.

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However, the committee learned that a neighborhood development plan was being finalized for Illogan.

The advisers were informed that the site was not considered suitable for development and that exceptional sites should only be developed if they offer 100% affordable housing.

Carn Brea Parish Council said it opposed the request because it believed it would be overdevelopment and worried about the impact it could have on the environment.

Parish councilors were also concerned about accessing the site along a “very narrow lane” and said that an ecological report that had been commissioned for the app did not lessen their concerns about the impact that the development could have on the environment.

Cornwall local councilor David Crabtree said the site was seen as a green space between West Tolgus and Illogan and said as it was outside the settlement boundaries it should be seen as an open countryside . He urged the committee to deny permission.

Committee member Loveday Jenkin said she was uncomfortable granting permission in principle to anything that could harm the ecology of the area.

She said: “If we take this climate emergency seriously, we should do everything to preserve these sites. ”

Brian Clemens, an independent advisor to St Just, criticized the introduction of the requests for permission in principle, saying they did not provide enough detail for a decision to be made.

He said: “I think the government made a mistake. This legislation has made our work much more difficult.

Some advisers raised concerns about the narrow access to the site and wondered if emergency vehicles would face any problems. However, the council’s roads officers said they had no objections and lawyers warned that if the application is denied for traffic reasons, it would likely be lost on appeal and the council could face costs.

Legal adviser Ben Curnow said in a previous appeal the advice “had failed dramatically and there had been huge costs”.

Councilor John Thomas says he sees no reason to deny the request and suggests that it be accepted. During the vote that was agreed with seven for and three against.


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How bloat can be a win-win for struggling Americans https://e-jemed.org/how-bloat-can-be-a-win-win-for-struggling-americans/ https://e-jemed.org/how-bloat-can-be-a-win-win-for-struggling-americans/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 18:03:42 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/how-bloat-can-be-a-win-win-for-struggling-americans/ Unemployment and the shift to remote work have confined many American workers to their homes for much of the past year and a half. But some find it difficult to keep their homes adequately lit, heated and cooled. According to a recent Census Bureau survey, more than 37 million Americans have been unable to pay […]]]>

Unemployment and the shift to remote work have confined many American workers to their homes for much of the past year and a half. But some find it difficult to keep their homes adequately lit, heated and cooled. According to a recent Census Bureau survey, more than 37 million Americans have been unable to pay an energy bill in the past year. The impact was immediate: since March 2020, the Center for Biological Diversity estimates that more than one million homes in the United States have seen their utilities shut down – and as pandemic moratoria on utility shutdowns expire, millions more are vulnerable to overdue bills and potential shutdowns.

Clearly, more equitable approaches to energy are needed. Weatherization (modifications made to buildings to increase energy efficiency) offers a way to reduce utility bills while reducing greenhouse gas emissions. It also offers the potential to create green jobs and improve the health and safety of American homes.

Unlike many other environmental issues, funding for weatherization tends to attract broad bipartisan support. For example, in Georgia, the nonprofit Georgia Interfaith Power and Light (GIPL) has worked for two decades to mobilize a religious response to global warming. In 2010, GIPL created Power Wise, a program designed to help congregations reduce their carbon emissions by improving energy efficiency. Since then, the program has funded more than 400 energy efficiency projects and distributed nearly $ 1 million in grants.

“We believe that one of the roles of the faith community is to hold bad actors to account. We need to take care of our communities, regardless of our political affiliations, ”says Codi Norred, Executive Director of GIPL.

A national movement to finance the weatherization

Since 1976, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Weatherization assistance program (WAP) has provided funds that help thousands of people every year tamper with their homes. But according to the agency’s own estimates, less than one percent of eligible low-income households are able to take advantage of WAP money each year. The main problem is the lack of funding: there is simply not enough money to help isolate the majority of the homes of the most needy families.

That’s why Dream Corps, a nonprofit working to build a more sustainable and equitable society, calls on Congress to dramatically increase investments in WAP, with the goal of reaching $ 10 billion. funding. Green For All, the Dream Corps initiative dedicated to solving environmental, economic and racial justice issues, also works to improve the coordination of federal, state, and utility-managed programs that help people pay their taxes. energy bills. The goal is to make it easier for these programs to identify eligible households, helping people access funds for needed home repairs, weatherization and relief on utility bills.

Green For All believes that if the federal government invests 10 billion dollars in the weatherization of low-income housing – the amount the National Energy Assistance Directors Association considers necessary to meet the current need – this would generate more than 100,000 jobs. A recent Green report for all found that these jobs pay more on average than the national median salary. They are also accessible to workers who do not have higher education, and they are usually local jobs that are difficult to contract out, providing job stability. And as the work of Power Wise shows, the appeal of such programs runs on both sides of the political aisle.

A major investment in weatherization finance would help those most affected by energy costs. Even before the pandemic, low-income households spent more than double their income on utilities as the median household. Like Alexis Blizman, legislative and policy director at the Ecology Center, an environmental nonprofit in Ann Arbor, says, “Those with the lowest incomes experience the greatest energy burden. “

Address health and safety issues

Historically, many households eligible for weatherization funds have missed them due to pre-existing health or safety concerns. These issues, such as leaky roofs, mold infiltration, or the wiring of buttons and tubes, must be addressed before weather protection measures can be taken safely and effectively. The problem is, dealing with them costs money. “The most vulnerable cannot afford to make these fixes. They are trapped in a cycle that maintains their energy load at a disproportionate level, ”explains Blizman.

A key element of Green For All’s advocacy is to ensure that vulnerable households have access to both pre-weatherization and weatherization works. Recent work from the Ecology Center shows just how effective such advocacy can be. In 2020, the organization participated in settlements with Michigan’s two largest energy utilities. As part of the deal, reached in conjunction with the Michigan Department of the Attorney General and Michigan’s Citizens Utility Board, utilities agreed to improve the affordability of weatherizing homes for low-income households. spending approximately $ 2 million each on health and safety pilots. The goal of these programs is to help low-income customers make the repairs and home improvements needed to begin the weatherization process.

Over the past year, these programs have improved the safety and energy efficiency of more than 200 homes, leading to lower energy bills and better health outcomes for the people who live there, including reduced exposure to chemicals. asthma triggers like allergens, molds and dust mites. . The programs are scheduled to expire within the year, but Blizman is currently working to find public funding that would extend them for several years.

Weatherization programs such as these not only improve the health of vulnerable populations, but make their homes more resistant to extreme weather events. This is especially important in areas of the country prone to episodes of extreme heat or cold. California’s Central Valley, for example, experiences both ends of the temperature spectrum. A statewide weather protection program, supported by Green For All, helps residents operate the furnace in the winter and the air conditioner in the summer.

Emilio Rentana is just one of many Fresno residents who have benefited from the programming in recent years. His house needed new windows to optimize the efficiency of its heating and cooling. “They went in and took the window measurements, and about a week later they came in and installed the windows in one day,” says Rentana. “It gives me a good feeling to know that there are people out there who care.”


Dream Corps Green for All works at the intersection of environmental, economic and racial justice movements to advance solutions to poverty and pollution. We advocate for strong, resilient and healthy neighborhoods through political work and empathy-based storytelling that ensures that as the clean economy grows, it brings good jobs, better health and opportunities. historically underserved communities. Learn more by visiting www.thedreamcorps.org or follow us on Twitter @GreenForAll.




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Why has the expansion of Barcelona airport sparked mass protests? https://e-jemed.org/why-has-the-expansion-of-barcelona-airport-sparked-mass-protests/ https://e-jemed.org/why-has-the-expansion-of-barcelona-airport-sparked-mass-protests/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 09:53:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/why-has-the-expansion-of-barcelona-airport-sparked-mass-protests/ Several environmental and agricultural organizations have called for the expansion to be halted due to the fact that nearby wetlands and farms are expected to be destroyed. The demonstration took place on Calle Tarragona in the Catalan capital between Plaça d’Espanya and Plaça dels Països Catalans. The protests have always been held, although last week […]]]>

Several environmental and agricultural organizations have called for the expansion to be halted due to the fact that nearby wetlands and farms are expected to be destroyed.

The demonstration took place on Calle Tarragona in the Catalan capital between Plaça d’Espanya and Plaça dels Països Catalans.

The protests have always been held, although last week Spain suspended the € 1.7 billion airport extension project, citing differences with the Catalan government, after President Pere Aragonès said he wanted to avoid destroying the La Ricarda lagoon, a nature reserve next to the airport.

Environmentalists have decided not to cancel the march, in case plans to expand the airport continue.

READ ALSO: Six things you need to know about Barcelona Airport’s planned 1.7 billion euro expansion

Political representatives of ERC, En Comú Podem and CUP were also present, as well as the leader of Más País, Íñigo Errejón; the Deputy Mayor for Ecology of Barcelona City Hall, Janet Sanz, and the Mayor of El Prat de Llobregat, Lluís Mijoler.

Residents from parts of the city walked towards Calle Tarragona and could be seen holding signs stating Nature yes, airport no and cries of slogans such as “More zucchini and fewer planes” and “Fighting for the climate, health and life”.

One of the largest groups of people was that of El Prat de Llobregat, the municipality that houses the airport, which was driven by tractors.

People march in a demonstration against the expansion of Barcelona-El Prat airport. Photo by Pau BARRENA / AFP

In addition to protesting the expansion of El Prat airport, people were also demonstrating against the Winter Olympics in the Pyrenees and the airport extensions in Mallorca and Madrid.

Zeroport representative Sara Mingorría said: “We are here to defend not only La Ricarda, but the entire Delta”.

The philosopher Marina Garcés also argued that the expansion of the airport would mean “more borders, more mass tourism, more control and more precarious jobs”.

The head of municipalities in the Catalan parliament, Jéssica Albiach, who also attended the demonstration, asked the PSOE for “consistency”: “You cannot pass a law against climate change and, at the same time, defend the interests of ‘Aena [the airport operations company]”, she said.

She also urged the head of the Generalitat, Father Aragonès, to “say definitively no.

If the expansion of Barcelona airport continues, environmentalists say CO2 emissions would increase by at least 33%. These levels would exceed the limits set by the Catalan government’s climate objectives.


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