Ecology Jobs – E JEMED http://e-jemed.org/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 14:39:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://e-jemed.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1-150x150.png Ecology Jobs – E JEMED http://e-jemed.org/ 32 32 Center Port Holdings Ltd The world’s first deep-sea container terminal powered by tidal energy https://e-jemed.org/center-port-holdings-ltd-the-worlds-first-deep-sea-container-terminal-powered-by-tidal-energy/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 14:39:18 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/center-port-holdings-ltd-the-worlds-first-deep-sea-container-terminal-powered-by-tidal-energy/ Center Port Holdings Limited, a UK-based marine infrastructure and renewable energy developer led by James Sutcliffe, which today announced the first steps in the development of a major tidal energy program in the Wash which incorporates the world’s first tidal-fed deep sea container terminal as well as the provision of landside flood defenses for up […]]]>

Center Port Holdings Limited, a UK-based marine infrastructure and renewable energy developer led by James Sutcliffe, which today announced the first steps in the development of a major tidal energy program in the Wash which incorporates the world’s first tidal-fed deep sea container terminal as well as the provision of landside flood defenses for up to one million people.

The automated zero-carbon deep-sea container terminal will be capable of handling between 1,500,000 and 4,000,000 containers per year and will handle the world’s largest container ships, supply services and Ro-Ro vessels. ).

Cross section

The proposal includes the construction of a hydroelectric structure within the project that will capture incoming and outgoing tides twice daily, providing fully predictable power for the terminal and up to 600,000 area homes and businesses.

Center Port Holdings entered into a strategic partnership with the UK’s leading energy company, Centrica, which invested in the seed round enabling Center Port to engage environmental and technical consultants to begin work on a study feasibility.

Road from Lincs to Norfolk

Centrica would provide a guaranteed price for the renewable energy produced by the tidal turbines to support their construction. It is expected that some of the renewable energy produced off-peak could be used to create green hydrogen to decarbonize the agriculture and transportation sector.

The structure will act as a flood defense system against storm surges resulting from climate change, which would otherwise damage sensitive habitats and wildlife in The Wash estuary. Turbine locks built into the structure will protect farmland, homes and vital industry from floods and tidal waves in Lincolnshire, Norfolk and Cambridgeshire, which generate a third of the UK’s vegetable production United.

Proposed container port

The program is expected to create more than 1,000 jobs during construction and when completed will attract significant job opportunities in manufacturing, shipping, port operations and green industries to the region. region. In addition, there will be opportunities for recreational activities such as safe sailing/watersports and marinas in the Wash with the central harbor in place.

Center Port will champion upgrading opportunities in coastal towns and villages, improving transport links with the connection between South Lincolnshire and North Norfolk by providing a 20 minute alternative to the congested A17. The container terminal will have a state-of-the-art rail facility linked to the Skegness – Birmingham Rail line to carry up to 40% of container traffic.

James Sutcliffe, Managing Director of Center Port Holdings, said: “Centre Port is a multi-revenue development where supply chain decarbonisation is a priority in today’s world.

Road from Norfolk to Lincs

“Centre Port offers multiple business opportunities and a low/zero carbon operation throughout the import/export chain, while also being 50% closer to the East and West Midlands it serves.

“He is well placed to generate new economic opportunity in Lincolnshire/Norfolk and Cambridge, job creation and leveling up in local communities that are otherwise dependent on the agricultural sector.

“The local environment is seriously threatened by climate change. Our mission is to conserve Wash’s boundaries, wildlife and ecology and minimize the impacts of climate change that could devastate these sensitive areas.

Greg McKenna, managing director of Centrica Business Solutions, said, “We are thrilled to help Center Port explore its ambitious plans for the Wash. The project represents one of the largest tidal power projects in the world and provides a reliable source of green energy. energy in the UK. The first step is to understand the role such a program would play in a region of the country that is particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change.
Source: Port Center

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Havering Green Belt data center would set a ‘dangerous precedent’ https://e-jemed.org/havering-green-belt-data-center-would-set-a-dangerous-precedent/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 07:22:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/havering-green-belt-data-center-would-set-a-dangerous-precedent/ An environmental group has warned that a data center project on Havering’s greenbelt would set a ‘dangerous precedent’. The plan, presented jointly by Havering Council and developer Digital Reefinvolves the construction of 15 warehouse-sized data storage facilities in a new ‘eco park’ off the M25, east of Upminster and Cranham. Havering Council describes the data […]]]>

An environmental group has warned that a data center project on Havering’s greenbelt would set a ‘dangerous precedent’.

The plan, presented jointly by Havering Council and developer Digital Reefinvolves the construction of 15 warehouse-sized data storage facilities in a new ‘eco park’ off the M25, east of Upminster and Cranham.

Havering Council describes the data center as a “£5.3bn inbound investment” that would create 1,200 local jobs and bring in around £13.5m in revenue over four years.

The proposed site aspires to be carbon neutral, although this can only be achieved by offsetting its energy consumption with the green benefits of the park and its use of renewable energy.

Ian Pirie, coordinator at Havering Friends of the Earth, said the group was “extremely concerned” about the proposal.

He said: “The area to the east of the borough is already going to be badly damaged if the Thames underpass – which we oppose – is moving forward, and constructing new buildings on Greenbelt land would set a dangerous precedent.

“We recognize that the proposal is at a very early stage and would like to comment further when more details become known.”

Romford Recorder: Ian Pirie, coordinator at Havering Friends of the EarthIan Pirie, coordinator at Havering Friends of the Earth (Photo: Ian Pirie)

Cllr Ray Morgon, leader of Havering Council, said any construction on the greenbelt would require ‘very special circumstances’, and therefore ‘no individual case would set a precedent’.

He said: “Through the update to the local plan, we will also look at how to protect good quality, publicly accessible open space in Havering.

“We value our green spaces, which is why the majority of the site, up to 300 acres currently inaccessible to the public, will also become an ecological and community forest park for the public to enjoy. It will in fact open up green spaces, creating valuable ecological corridors, bridle paths and walking and cycling routes from east to west for all to enjoy.

Cllr Morgon added that the loss of farmland will be offset by on-site research and development opportunities, led by the University of Leicester, including the creation of efficient food production.

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Long-time CSIRO CEO Dr. Larry Marshall will complete his third and final term in June 2023 https://e-jemed.org/long-time-csiro-ceo-dr-larry-marshall-will-complete-his-third-and-final-term-in-june-2023/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 23:20:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/long-time-csiro-ceo-dr-larry-marshall-will-complete-his-third-and-final-term-in-june-2023/ The Board of CSIRO, Australia’s national science agency, has announced that Chief Executive Dr Larry Marshall will complete his third and final term in June 2023. Dr Marshall will be CSIRO’s longest-serving Chief Executive since a half-century. Over the past eight years, under Dr. Marshall’s leadership, CSIRO has renewed its focus on its unique goal […]]]>

The Board of CSIRO, Australia’s national science agency, has announced that Chief Executive Dr Larry Marshall will complete his third and final term in June 2023. Dr Marshall will be CSIRO’s longest-serving Chief Executive since a half-century.

Over the past eight years, under Dr. Marshall’s leadership, CSIRO has renewed its focus on its unique goal of solving the world’s greatest challenges through innovative science and technology.

Kathryn Fagg, Chair of the CSIRO Board of Directors, praised Dr. Marshall’s accomplishments. “Dr. Marshall has led CSIRO to achieve significant scientific breakthroughs, translate his research into real-world solutions, and deliver staggering benefit to our nation – eight times the investment.”

“Today’s CSIRO is Australia’s most connected research organisation, collaborating across universities and helping thousands of small and large industrial partners put science at the center of creating a better future. .”

Commenting on his leadership at CSIRO, Dr. Marshall thanked the 5,672 people at CSIRO who do their best every day for the nation.

“It is a rare privilege to work with people so determined to succeed for the good of a nation and its people. Over the past eight years, together, we have reignited Australia’s ambition to solve our greatest challenges through science.

“I am honored to know all that has been provided by our national science agency and how proud every Australian can be of their accomplishments.”

Solutions from science

Shortly after joining the organization, Dr. Marshall introduced the 2020 Strategy to focus CSIRO on continued scientific excellence, but with the goal of amplifying the delivery of science-based solutions – to get science across of the laboratory in the hands of the community. Innovations like Future Feed – an algae-derived feed additive to reduce livestock emissions; the hydrogen cracker to catalyze a $50 billion Australian hydrogen energy industry, Colvera – a highly sensitive and specific blood test for colorectal cancer recurrence and the development of omega-3 oils, proteins and bioactive from marine microorganisms.

Science for a great future

Paving the way for greater future science for national benefit Dr. Marshall has created “future science platforms” with $425 million invested in Horizon 3 research since 2016 – cutting-edge, transformative future science. This includes 20 areas of promising new science and technology. Examples: quantum technology, immune resilience, permanent carbon lock, advanced engineering biology.

New invention and growing small business

Dr Marshall has transformed CSIRO’s approach to solving Australia’s biggest challenges, identifying six national challenges and enabling the organization to work better across all scientific disciplines. New areas of research were also established at scale, making CSIRO Australia’s largest data science cluster and its premier health cluster that enabled CSIRO’s proactive response to COVID-19.

Supporting Australian innovation, Dr Marshall oversaw the creation of ON, CSIRO’s incubator program to help research-driven start-ups get off the ground. Since its inception in 2015, ON has supported 3,314 researchers from 52 Australian research organizations and created 510 new jobs and 66 companies, which have raised $114.6 million in investment capital and $115.8 million in grants of marketing.

Drawing on his experience in building companies to propel innovation, Dr. Marshall led the creation of the CSIRO Innovation Fund – Main Sequence Ventures. The Fund was created to help support the translation of Australian research into new ventures to solve big challenges. Since 2017, the CSIRO Innovation Fund, Main Sequence, has helped create 42 deep tech companies. Overall, Strategy 2020 has helped create or transform hundreds of businesses, creating billions of new economic value and thousands of jobs for Australians.

On a mission to Australia

In August 2020, Dr. Marshall led CSIRO to establish missions – large research programs to tackle big, multi-faceted problems by bringing together research agencies, universities, industry, government and society. community with results that lead to positive benefits, new jobs and economic growth. Missions launched include Hydrogen, Future Proteins, Drought Resilience, Reliable Agrifood Exports, Ending Plastic Waste, Towards Net Zero.

Bushfires, COVID and floods

The 2019/20 bushfire season built on 70 years of CSIRO bushfire research as the nation was devastated by its impact. Dr Marshall, focusing on building a national laboratory infrastructure for Australian research, presented a new national research laboratory. The National Bushfire Behavior Research Laboratory brings together industry, research and government partners to harness the latest science and technology in the face of more frequent and severe bushfire seasons.

CSIRO launched the Australian Center for Disease Preparedness and engaged in a wide range of activities with government and industry in response to COVID-19, including preclinical testing of potential vaccines, understanding the virus and its mutations, wastewater monitoring, support for the manufacture of surgical masks, and analyzing and sharing data trends and the impact on health services. Under the leadership of Dr Marshall, the CSIRO National Vaccine and Therapeutics Lab will enhance Australia’s ability to produce vaccines and drug treatments on land. The new $23.1 million national laboratory will see CSIRO researchers transform vaccine and drug candidates into mass-produced products for clinical trials.

Although floods are part of Australia’s natural ecology, they can cause significant damage to infrastructure and loss of life. CSIRO is on the ground in Rivers North – meeting with flood-affected communities in seven LGAs – as part of a flood mitigation study, which will help the government prioritize projects in at-risk areas to protect Australians.

Whether it’s inspiring school children with physics experiments, pulling yet another amazing piece of science out of your pocket, building start-ups out of science, or fiercely championing integrity and trust of the organization – Dr Marshall reminded us all that science has the power to solve seemingly impossible challenges and create a better future for all Australians.

/Public release. This material from the original organization/authors may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author or authors.View Full here.

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People in the news | News, Sports, Jobs https://e-jemed.org/people-in-the-news-news-sports-jobs/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 06:32:05 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/people-in-the-news-news-sports-jobs/ Dempsey: ‘Disenchanted’ is an escape from dark films PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Actor Patrick Dempsey knows the world can be a dark place, and many TV streaming options are also dark these days. He thinks he’ll get the antidote next week on Disney+. The November 18 release of “Disillusioned” comes 15 years after […]]]>

Dempsey: ‘Disenchanted’ is an escape from dark films

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Actor Patrick Dempsey knows the world can be a dark place, and many TV streaming options are also dark these days. He thinks he’ll get the antidote next week on Disney+.

The November 18 release of “Disillusioned” comes 15 years after the “Delighted.” The two stars Amy Adams play the cheerful and singing role of Giselle, who falls in love with a lawyer played by Dempsey.

He said that during his recent travels he had been disappointed with the heavy and dark entertainment options. “Do I really want to get into this dark movie right now? I just want to escape the realities of the world, not listen to the news, stay away from social media and watch something, he said.

Curiously, “Disillusioned” has a darker theme than the original as Giselle’s life is turned upside down. “But it’s done in a light-hearted way and hopefully in a way that can distract and entertain,” he said.

The Maine native is on a roll after dying his hair white to play race car driver Piero Taruffi in the “Ferrari” biopic by writer/director Michael Mann due out later next year. Adam Driver will play Enzo Ferrari.

Dempsey, an actual race car driver, said he did all the piloting himself. “It’s the best role I’ve ever had. It’s fantastic,” he added.

Dempsey spoke on Wednesday while in Maine to visit the Saco School of Ecology, which aims to change the way people think about nature through hands-on, experiential learning.

He visited a new catering center funded by bottled water brand Poland Spring and met some children. More people need to visit school for education “about how they can take some of that and incorporate it into their lives, so that we can be more in tune with our environment,” he said.



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The future of healthy tourism in Zimbabwe starts with healthy local communities https://e-jemed.org/the-future-of-healthy-tourism-in-zimbabwe-starts-with-healthy-local-communities/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 05:09:38 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/the-future-of-healthy-tourism-in-zimbabwe-starts-with-healthy-local-communities/ Skift grip People like Tendai Nhunzwi are often invisible to the center of a destination’s tourism economy. In Zimbabwe, Nhunzwi, an accountant by training, works tirelessly on the front lines to ensure local communities are nourished and healthy, emphasizing the basic principle that there would be no tourism without these communities. Colin Nagy One of […]]]>

Skift grip

People like Tendai Nhunzwi are often invisible to the center of a destination’s tourism economy. In Zimbabwe, Nhunzwi, an accountant by training, works tirelessly on the front lines to ensure local communities are nourished and healthy, emphasizing the basic principle that there would be no tourism without these communities.

Colin Nagy

One of the lasting lessons for tourism as the world emerges from the pandemic is that it all really starts from scratch – with communities, healthy communities laying the groundwork for creating a thriving tourism trade.

But the obstacles to the development of these communities are many, as Zimbabwe shows us, for example, and one of the reasons why the work of people like Tendai Nhunzwi is so essential for this southern African country, home to countless wildlife sanctuaries and natural wonders, including the Victoria Falls. Rebuilding the tourism economy, which saw a 28% drop in employment from 2019 to 2020 to 128,000will start locally.

Tendai Nhunzwi, General Manager of Human Resource and Neighbor Awareness Program for the Malilangwe Trust Source: Malilangwe Trust.

Yet food shortages in Africa are expected to be even worse this year, according to the United Nations.

It’s a perfect storm of inflation, a global pandemic, as well as a war in Ukraine affecting grain supplies. Extreme weather and climate change are making the situation worse, and the economic pressure on farmers means they sometimes lack the seeds, fertilizers and other items needed to sow and harvest next year.

The IMF estimates that staple food prices in sub-Saharan Africa increased by an average of 24% between 2020 and 2022the highest since the global financial crisis of 2008. According to the reportThis corresponds to an 8.5% increase in the cost of a typical food consumption basket (above generalized price increases).

The situation is more serious in Zimbabwe which, in addition to external factors, has suffered from political instability, corruption and some of the the fastest inflation in the world. The government is unable to provide all the services it needs, so a not-for-profit organization, the Malilangwe Trust, seeks to fill certain gaps. It describes itself as “a wholly Zimbabwean non-profit organization dedicated to environmental conservation and committed to the development of life in our local communities”.

The Trust and Nhunzwi work hand in hand with local hospitality and tourism.

Safari brand Singita’s Pamushana Lodge The property is the ecotourism partner of the Malilangwe Trust. Although the two are operationally and fiscally independent of each other, the common thread is ecotourism to support conservation. The relationship is symbiotic: without the work of the Trust, wildlife populations would not thrive and therefore there would be no safari tourism product. It’s a mutually beneficial relationship: tourism dollars from well-heeled travelers support community work. Community work and conservation create a more vibrant and thriving ecosystem to visit.

Nhunzwi, as the General Manager of the Human Resources and Neighbor Outreach Program for the Malilangwe Trust, is at the forefront of many things to help the local population: but food security is at the forefront. And, as an English-trained accountant (he holds a degree from Oxford Brookes), part of his mission is the effectiveness of programs and how they evolve towards higher goals. It’s one thing to have nonprofits, it’s another to have nonprofits that manage donations and capital effectively.

In 2003, the Malilangwe Trust established the ‘Child Supplementary Feeding Scheme’, in response to the negative impacts of the 2002 drought which left most children in the district at risk of hunger and malnutrition.

Nhunzwi said it was originally designed to provide a fully balanced meal each school day to children under five at satellite meal sites and children under 12 at area schools. Today it has expanded significantly and “the project is providing nutrition to Zimbabwean children, reaching over 20,000 a day”.

Nhunzwi mentioned that in addition to feeding the mouth, it solves a big problem: lack of access and long journeys to school. Children “have to walk long distances to school, having a nutritious meal increases attendance but also improves nutrition and overall health.” Program data shows that it has had a positive impact on school enrollment and improved attendance. It’s not just about tackling a lofty mission, getting rid of growling stomachs, but it’s about achieving higher order attendance and graduation goals in areas poor rural areas of the country where going to school is not always as compulsory as in other places.

Since the program began some 20 years ago, the trust has grown to employ 32 people in local communities who are responsible for food handling and preparation, ensuring consistency and reliability of delivery. Although Covid has closed schools and disrupted the curriculum for 2020 and a short part of 2021, it is back in operation, as Africa’s food crisis worsens.

Nhunzwi started in Malilangwe in 2007, initially in human resources, but much of his work is in the field, administering projects initiated by the trust. And food is one of the most essential elements of its mission. He suggests the Trust fills a valuable NGO to help a country that has been rocked by recurring economic instability and a government that has gaps in what it can actually provide. “I know very well the lifestyle of most rural communities in the country, he said. “Children are vulnerable because of food shortages and sometimes lack of access to quality education.”

In addition to feeding the children, the Trust also has several community projects including a market garden to grow fresh produce, as e-learning labs, for remote and rural students to follow the Zimbabwean school curriculum. There is also a Conservation and Wildlife Education Program, to start conservation education early and to steer children away from the economically tempting paths of poaching and bushmeat hunting, which are both disastrous for the country’s delicate ecology and for the future of animals like the rhinoceros.

With an accountant’s eye for efficiency and return on investment, Nhunzwi said the conservation program turns children into advocates, helps control their parents and serves as micro-ambassadors for the greater good. Students are beginning to see their local environment with fresh eyes, even going on safari like some tourists visiting the country. It’s different from a classroom: it’s an immersive introduction to an entire ecosystem and the true value of wildlife. Food security, education and the early childhood conservation studies approach are all investments that will hopefully have an exponential return on investment for the surrounding areas.

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Student Research Equipment Closet Reduces Barriers to Field Experiments https://e-jemed.org/student-research-equipment-closet-reduces-barriers-to-field-experiments/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 23:21:10 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/student-research-equipment-closet-reduces-barriers-to-field-experiments/ Enjoying time in nature is much more comfortable with the right things. Gear like hiking boots and a warm sleeping bag can mean the difference between a transformative experience and a totally miserable outing. But buying outdoor basics can require considerable financial means. For cash-strapped students, equipment can be a major barrier to participating in […]]]>

Enjoying time in nature is much more comfortable with the right things. Gear like hiking boots and a warm sleeping bag can mean the difference between a transformative experience and a totally miserable outing.

But buying outdoor basics can require considerable financial means. For cash-strapped students, equipment can be a major barrier to participating in experiences such as a biology field trip or a geology club field trip.

“It’s a huge start-up expense to have to buy all of this if it’s your first time out in the field, especially for groups historically excluded from field research, if you don’t have family that hikes,” says UC Riverside graduate student Catherine Nguyen. . “We all know college is already expensive. All of these additional costs on top of paying your tuition are so high and continue to exclude these groups.

At UC Riverside, student groups have a plan to make sure outdoor gear issues are a thing of the past. They have developed student research Gear cabinet to lend items such as hiking boots, gaiters, sunscreen, and backpacks to students who plan to participate in field research or other field trips to places like system sites of nature reserves. A crowdfunding effort for the project, which has already raised more than $1,500 of its $3,500 goal, will be accepting donations until November 20.

Graduate students from the Center for Conservation Biology on campus partnered with members of UCR’s SEEDS (Strategies for Ecology, Education, Diversity, and Sustainability) chapter to organize the closet. SEEDS is an undergraduate club associated with the Ecological Society of America that promotes diversity in ecology with field trips and professional development for undergraduate students.

To verify equipment, students must demonstrate academic need. Enrollment in a field course, grade from a faculty member, enrollment in a SEEDS field trip, or similar proof is required. Those interested in borrowing from the Equipment Library should email theseedsur@gmail.com.

Caryn Iwanaga witnessed the problems caused by inadequate outdoor gear during a SEEDS trip she helped organize in the NRS Santa Cruz Island Reserve. “Most of our undergraduate participants had never been in the field before. It was actually a dangerous situation as the terrain was quite dangerous and some people didn’t have hiking boots or country clothes. We had to climb these mountains and people just brought their school backpacks and they kinda wrecked themselves, says the gear closet co-founder and recipient of an NRS Advancing Inclusivity internship from UCR.

A lack of decent gear can really hurt a student’s experience in the field, says Nguyen, co-founder of the Gear Closet. “It reduces your sense of self-efficacy because you’re like, ‘oh, my feet hurt’ or ‘oh, all my stuff is torn up.’ You think you might not be cut out for this field, which is absolutely not true if you just don’t have the right equipment.

While most UC campuses, including Riverside, offer recreational outdoor equipment rentals, the process can be quite hassle-free for what are often all-day field trips. On the other hand, “if we could just talk to them about the hardware closet upfront, while they’re signing up for things, that would make the process a lot easier,” Iwanaga says.

According to organizers, removing barriers to opportunities on the ground is a matter of equity in education. Field experiences have been shown to improve retention, graduation rates, and academic achievement, especially among minority students. Not being able to participate in on-the-job opportunities prevents students from learning important skills that could lead directly to jobs.

The gear closet will be especially helpful for students trying out field opportunities for the first time, Nguyen says. “They won’t have to invest in something and then find out, oh, actually, I don’t like field research. Second, they haven’t invested hundreds of dollars in equipment they will never touch again.

The project has been running for two years with material donated by the San Gorgonio section of the Sierra Club. The money donated by UCR faculty and others have contributed will allow the group to fill equipment gaps, such as boots in sizes that have not been donated, and to purchase perishable items or disposable items such as sunscreen and socks.

For larger items like tents, the project has an agreement with Outdoor Excursions, UCR’s recreational outdoor equipment rental program. Students will be able to check items from outdoor excursions without having to pay out of pocket. Rentals will be covered by the student’s lab, the UCR Center for Conservation Biology, or maybe even the gear closet.

said Iwanaga. “We are truly grateful to everyone who has donated and can spread the word about this obstacle that we all encounter at some point in our careers. It’s really encouraging to see how much people care about our journey and support it in a practical way.

(Article written by Kathleen Wong/UCNRS)

(Cover image: Lilkin/iStock/Getty)

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Despite Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, Moscow’s neighbors are right to drop the bomb, says Kazakh author https://e-jemed.org/despite-russias-invasion-of-ukraine-moscows-neighbors-are-right-to-drop-the-bomb-says-kazakh-author/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 11:57:50 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/despite-russias-invasion-of-ukraine-moscows-neighbors-are-right-to-drop-the-bomb-says-kazakh-author/ ALMATY, Kazakhstan — After setting the scene with an intimate portrayal of the landscape that towers over the world’s ninth-largest country, scholar and nuclear policy expert Togzhan Kassenova’s new non-fiction work, Atomic Steppe, suddenly picks up the pace. a thriller. It was in the steppes of the author’s home country of Kazakhstan that Moscow’s journey […]]]>

ALMATY, Kazakhstan — After setting the scene with an intimate portrayal of the landscape that towers over the world’s ninth-largest country, scholar and nuclear policy expert Togzhan Kassenova’s new non-fiction work, Atomic Steppe, suddenly picks up the pace. a thriller.

It was in the steppes of the author’s home country of Kazakhstan that Moscow’s journey to the world’s largest nuclear arsenal began in earnest.

Kassenova’s in-depth account of the pristine test that brought the Soviet Union to nuclear parity with the United States is both gripping and chilling, while his descriptions of the long-term toll borne by the earth and people nearby of the Semipalatinsk test site after four decades of nuclear experimentation are harrowing.

Between 1949 and 1989, the Soviet Union supervised more than 450 nuclear tests in the Belgium-sized territory known as the “polygon”, more than two-thirds of the total carried out by Moscow during the Soviet period.

The Soviet Union detonated its first atomic bomb, known in the West as Joe-1, on August 29, 1949, at the Semipalatinsk site. Joe-1 was a direct copy of the plutonium bomb dropped on Nagasaki and had a yield of about 20 kilotons.

In the late 1980s, a Kazakh anti-nuclear movement was born, becoming what Kassenova describes as part of the “re-emergence of Kazakh identity”, a process that took a new turn after what many consider the disastrous invasion and not provoked from Ukraine by Russia.

But the heart of Atomic Steppe is an examination of the political processes that have seen Kazakhstan – like Ukraine and Belarus – give up the nuclear weapons they inherited from the union at the behest of the world’s two biggest nuclear powers. , the United States and Russia. .

But Russia’s war in Ukraine, its increasingly intimidating posture towards its neighbours, and the nuclear slashes of leader Vladimir Putin following a series of setbacks in the war have cast these decisions to disarm in a new light.

Kassenova, a Washington, D.C.-based senior fellow with the Project on International Security, Commerce, and Economic Statecraft (PISCES) at SUNY-Albany, and a member of the nuclear policy program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, told RFE/RL she had no doubt that the newly independent countries were doing what was best for them and for the world.

RFE/RL: At a recent conference in Almaty, you said that the legacy of nuclear testing in northeast Kazakhstan is not something people experienced, but something they still experience today. Can you talk a bit about the long-term impact on the people living in the area surrounding the polygon?

Togjan Kasenova: Even though more than three decades have passed since the last nuclear test at the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site, people are still paying the price. If you travel to the nearby villages of the former site, you will encounter the dark legacy of Soviet nuclear testing.

Studies by the Kazakh Institute of Radiation Medicine and Ecology in Semey (formerly known as Semipalatinsk) confirm that second and third generations of people exposed to ionizing radiation near the former nuclear test site of Semipalatinsk suffer from higher death and cancer rates.

From my own travels in the region, I would mention three observations: there are hardly any old people, many do not survive to retirement; you meet children (the fourth generation of victims) with visible health problems, such as extra or missing fingers, cancers; every family has one or more tragic stories – parents, children, friends or classmates who died too young.

Togzhan Kassenova attends a book conference in Almaty on October 6.

Togzhan Kassenova attends a book conference in Almaty on October 6.

As in the rest of rural Kazakhstan, socio-economic conditions in the region are appalling. In some places there is no running water and no modern pipes. People have to deal with poor living conditions, lack of jobs, limited medical care in addition to their continued suffering from Soviet nuclear tests. They are forced to travel to Astana or the city of Semey to receive medical treatment. Honestly, it baffles me how a country with a shiny capital and millions of dollars spent on image projects doesn’t provide enough care for nuclear test survivors.

RFE/RL: Ukraine, like Kazakhstan, gave up its nuclear arsenal at the end of the Cold War. History teaches us that full-fledged conflicts between nuclear-armed countries are rare. Do you think the populations of these countries should regret this decision, given what is happening in Ukraine?

Cassenova: Absolutely not. Renouncing nuclear arsenals was the right decision. Let us remember the kind of challenges that Kazakhstan and Ukraine faced at the time. What they needed most was to enter the international community on good terms — to receive foreign direct investment, foreign technology and access to international markets. If they had tried to fight their way into a nuclear club against established norms, they would have become pariah states.

Nuclear weapons programs would not have solved their problems. In fact, they would interfere with meeting the immediate needs of Kazakhstan and Ukraine – building economies, resolving socio-political crises in the wake of the Soviet collapse, and strengthening sovereignty. For Kazakhstan, choosing a non-nuclear path was an important part of building its national identity. [by] withdraw from the Soviet nuclear weapons program that so devastated its people.

I would also like to point out that Kazakhstan, Ukraine and Belarus received security guarantees of their sovereignty and territorial integrity in exchange for their decision to become non-nuclear.

Whether one of the signatories to the Budapest Memorandum – the Russian Federation – has so blatantly violated international norms and its own promises is another matter.

On the contrary, the current global tension caused by Russia’s war against Ukraine has highlighted a single truth: as long as nuclear weapons exist, the populations of all countries remain hostages.

RFE/RL: Astana has remained neutral since the start of the war while refraining from openly criticizing Russia’s actions. Given Kazakhstan’s nuclear history, how do you think its government might react to Russia’s use of a tactical nuclear weapon in Ukraine?

Cassenova: Kazakhstan’s position is firmly aligned with international norms and instruments. I expect the leaders of Kazakhstan to find Russia’s use of a tactical nuclear weapon in Ukraine abhorrent.

I cannot speak for the government, but I can tell you in no uncertain terms what I have heard from the new generation of Kazakh scholars and activists. They find the threat of nuclear use by Russia beyond irresponsibility. They also raise a question: should we consider a country that exceeds the nuclear facilities of another countrylike Russia did in Ukraine, a nuclear terrorist state?

RFE/RL: Kazakhstan has positioned itself as a leader in nuclear diplomacy, hosting high-level talks on Iran’s nuclear program over the past decade and cooperating with the International Atomic Energy Agency to set up a low-enriched uranium bank for international use on its territory. But is it also fair to say that denuclearization has also become part of former President Nursultan Nazarbayev’s cult of leadership?

Cassenova: There are several reasons why we have heard little about others involved in the closure of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site or in negotiations over the fate of nuclear weapons. The first reason is the personification of the modern history of Kazakhstan. There has been quite a bit of deliberate myth-making around Nursultan Nazarbaev as a one-man show. I find it unfortunate that until now the historical record has been skewed to focus on Nazarbaev to the detriment of the memory of many other people who contributed to nation building.

That said, it would be remiss not to give credit to the first president as he was the ultimate decision maker. Especially in the early 1990s, Nazarbaev showed political acumen in his relations with Moscow, Washington and other international partners. As a scholar, I fear that the discourse in Kazakhstan will shift to another extreme and that Nazarbayev’s good deeds will be denied because of what his figure has come to represent over time: nepotism, corruption and suppression of political opposition.

Candidate Nursultan Nazarbaev votes alongside his wife Sara Nazarbaeva (right) and grandson Nurali in the presidential election in Almaty in December 1991.

Candidate Nursultan Nazarbaev votes alongside his wife Sara Nazarbaeva (right) and grandson Nurali in the presidential election in Almaty in December 1991.

Another related reason why certain key figures have been relegated to obscurity has something to do with political competition. For example, in the case of the leader of the anti-nuclear movement, Olzhas Suleimenov, it was feared that he would become an alternative political figure to compete with Nazarbaev. Or take, for example, Tulegen Zhukeev, the former state councilor and deputy chairman of the National Security Council (Nazarbayev was chairman). Zhukeev was literally next after Nazarbaev tried to negotiate on nuclear issues in the early 1990s, but you won’t find his name in official accounts. Why? Zhukeev left the government and joined the opposition. Somehow, the context of Kazakhstan meant that all of its contributions to nation-building, in general – and in particular on nuclear issues – were nullified.

Part of my motivation for Atomic Steppe was to paint a more nuanced picture of Kazakhstan’s nuclear history and to add names other than Nazarbaev to Kazakhstan’s modern history.

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Ames City Council, Student Government Discuss Hurricane Welcoming Weekend – Iowa State Daily https://e-jemed.org/ames-city-council-student-government-discuss-hurricane-welcoming-weekend-iowa-state-daily/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 06:49:06 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/ames-city-council-student-government-discuss-hurricane-welcoming-weekend-iowa-state-daily/ The Ames City Council discussed the Cyclone Welcome Weekend, among a host of other topics, at a joint meeting with the Iowa State Student Government. The council meets with student government once per semester to discuss topics relevant to Ames students. Cyclone Hospitality Weekend Members of the Senate and City Council heard from Ames Police […]]]>

The Ames City Council discussed the Cyclone Welcome Weekend, among a host of other topics, at a joint meeting with the Iowa State Student Government.

The council meets with student government once per semester to discuss topics relevant to Ames students.

Cyclone Hospitality Weekend

Members of the Senate and City Council heard from Ames Police Chief Geoff Huff and Iowa State Police Chief Michael Newton on the home weekend proceedings cyclones. John Haila, Mayor of Ames, said the intent behind Cyclone Welcome Week was to create a safe environment for returning students to celebrate their return to the city.

Newton said 62.9% of those cited during the Cyclone Welcome Weekend were neither Iowa State students nor Ames residents. He added that before receiving citations, visitors told him they had heard that Ames was the place to be this weekend to party, but after receiving citations, the visitors would say, “Ames is lame”.

“We want Ames to be fun for all of you who are here and love Ames, Newton said. “We know that because you like Ames, you’re going to handle things appropriately, right?”

Huff and Newton, with the support of the council, expressed their wish to prevent out-of-town revelers unconnected with Ames from participating in Cyclone Welcome Weekend and other associated events.

“A lot of people came into town from the University of Iowa for this event, so we hope to see the number of people coming from out of town go down over time,” Huff said. “I hope they will stay at their university and that our event will continue with these well-planned official events. [and] well attended.

Huff said Ames police were having trouble recruiting staff for the cyclone welcome weekend because they had $5,000 in overtime, excluding overtime from supervisors who are not paid overtime. Newton said ISU police supplemented the Ames police force over the weekend because most activity is off campus.

“We also had accusations related to the printing of the sign – the giant signs – indicating that you might be towed away,” Huff said. “It was almost $2,200 plus the time and effort to put up and take down all the signs.”

Huff said he most often heard that events unfolding over the cyclone’s welcome weekend lacked the excitement of years past, which he said was hoped for. He added that the ordinances passed by city to increase penalties over weekend helped the parking situation.

Off-campus Senator Katherine Engelken, a graduate in animal ecology, suggested the administration hold events downtown during the cyclone’s welcome weekend to discourage parties. Haila said the Ames Chamber of Commerce participated in the Cyclone Welcome Weekend and was evaluating effective methods to attract more students to the town centre.

“I think it’s worth exploring further; I want to know specifically what you think would entice students to come,” Haila said.

Mental Health

On the topic of mental health, College of Design Senator Emi Thornton, an architecture major, asked the city council what they plan to do to address the salary and lease gaps in Ames as they have a negative impact on student mental health. .

“In low-wage terms, students were half the population for more than three-quarters of that year, and that’s a high workforce,” Thornton said. “When they are disenfranchised due to low pay and the high stress of many hours of lessons, their mental health will suffer. Treating mental health symptoms with workshops will not solve the long-term problem.

Thornton said the living wage at Ames was $15, then they listed city and campus jobs that pay less than $15.

“Seven of the 12 jobs currently posted on the city government website don’t pay $15 an hour, they pay less than that, you can just Google ‘City of Ames jobs’ to find that,” said said Thornton. “The ISU restaurants pay $13 an hour, the ISU library pays $10 an hour – these are the jobs that employ most of our students.”

At-Large Rep. Bronwyn Beatty-Hansen said the city is limited in what it can do to address the issues because the legislature has blocked city-level administrators from imposing minimum wages above minimum wage. of State. She suggested a meeting could be held with landlords and landlords to work out lease gaps, but that doesn’t guarantee a remedy.

Deputy city manager Deb Schildroth said she and the campus and community commission, made up of students, had conversations in an effort to fill in the gaps in the leases, citing a survey sent to the owners on the matter.

“While not all of the property management companies or landlords responded to our survey or told us about the issues we were trying to solve, a good number did,” Schildroth said. . “And on the issue of the lease gap, what landlords who participate and respond to our survey said is that if it was discussed with them in advance, they would try to make accommodations to allow people to stay in the apartment or move into their next apartment sooner.

Schildroth said there would be a cost associated with housing, but landlords would try to work with tenants.

Brian Vanderheyden, director of student welfare at Iowa State, said the university is completing a health and needs assessment. They said the assessment includes quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and environmental scanning, all to meet the needs of the Iowa State community.

“This part of it looks at 181 best practices that relate to a variety of topics such as basic needs, mental health, substance use, power response and others,” Vanderheyden said.

Vanderheyden expects the report to be completed by the end of the fall semester.

The city currently has no mental health initiatives specifically for underrepresented or marginalized communities. Mary Malausky, a junior psychology student and student government’s diversity equity and inclusion director, suggested the city take over, as people from marginalized communities are more likely to struggle to access mental health resources.

“Cultural competency and recognition of each person’s individual needs are at the root of the initiatives we take,” Schildroth said. “We would like to have more information on this. I think we can improve and we have to improve.

Ames Climate Action Plan

Schildroth gave a brief overview of Ames’ climate action plan to the Senate. The plan aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 3% by 2030, with a goal of net zero emissions by 2050. A city consultant detailed the six major actions the city must take to progress towards its objectives:

–Reduce vehicle emissions.
–Increase active transport.
–Increase public transport.
–Installation of retrofits.
– Achieve net zero emissions for new developments by reviewing existing policy.
–Reduce waste emissions.

“We have 29 action steps under these six big moves,” Schildroth said. “So what staff have been doing over the past few months is analyzing those action steps and looking at financial feasibility, legal feasibility, how this is going to affect our community and our residents and what kind of staff time or administrative time it will take to implement these action steps.”

City staff will report their findings to City Council at 6 p.m. on Nov. 15.

Student engagement

City council members and city staff asked the Senate for more ways students can engage with local government. Deputy City Manager Brian Phillips shared an app called Ames On The Go with the Senate.

“Ames On The Go allows anyone in the community to let the city know about issues you may be having with the community, whether it’s potholes, sidewalk repairs, traffic lights traffic not working properly, issues with parks and recreation, graffiti — things of that nature,” Phillips said.

The app also features events and jobs available throughout Ames.

Haila shared various committees open to students to contribute to the affairs of the city. Having served on the transit agency’s board of directors for five years, Hailia said joining a committee is a good way to examine how the city and state of Iowa work together.

“I know a lot of people aren’t engaged in city government, maybe because they think it doesn’t affect their day-to-day life, but there’s definitely a lot going on in this city that matters. said Ward 4 Rep. Rachel Junck, a graduate student in business administration. “The sales tax you pay at any Ames restaurant or retail store – it’s because of the government.”

Pedestrian master plan

Damion Pregitzer, Traffic Engineer for the City of Ames, provided an update on Walk Bike Roll Ames, a project that aims to make walking, cycling and driving safer and more comfortable through Ames, according to the city’s website.

“It’s basically an infrastructure plan,” Pregitzer said. “He will talk about politics; it will talk about ways to encourage walking and cycling and things like that, but the plan focuses on how the network is designed, how it is planned for the future and how it is paid for.

The plan only affects city-run spaces, leaving the state of Iowa with the ability to come up with its own plan. Pregitzer said students can stay up to date with the plan by visiting the city’s website and signing up for updates.

Thornton asked if the city would impose an ordinance requiring helmets on bicycles, to which Pregitzer replied that such an ordinance would be added if the consultants working on the plan suggested it after reviewing current policies and best practices.

“If we don’t have this type of law or something that [Thornton was] describing we could make a recommendation when the plan is ready to pass that we have a helmet law or we have some other type of thing and then it will be up to the city council to decide if they want to go ahead with that,” Pregitzer said.

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The Power of Networking in the New Economy https://e-jemed.org/the-power-of-networking-in-the-new-economy/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 00:20:48 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/the-power-of-networking-in-the-new-economy/ It’s not what you know, it’s who you know, or so the saying goes. Few people would refute that or the fact that networking can boost our careers. In fact, networking can take us to places we can barely imagine. However, in the age of the fast-paced, non-standard gig economy that relies heavily on temporary […]]]>

It’s not what you know, it’s who you know, or so the saying goes. Few people would refute that or the fact that networking can boost our careers. In fact, networking can take us to places we can barely imagine.

However, in the age of the fast-paced, non-standard gig economy that relies heavily on temporary positions, we need a new framework for understanding networking. Even before the Covid-19 pandemic disrupted work as we know it and accelerated the rise of the gig economy, work had shifted towards the short term, atypical arrangements such as freelance contracts and freelances.

In the creative industries, where value of the practitioner’s work is not easy to define and consumer demand is generally uncertain, jobs are often on a contractual and precarious per project. Models, film directors, musicians, publishers, graphic designers and others took gigs before the term was even popularized. Today, freelance contracts are common in both white collar and pink collar industriesand even in high profile areas like entertainment and information technology.

Changing the tides, changing the bonds

In the sociology of labor and markets, social capital is an influential concept. Studies have confirmed the role of the social link shape, restrict and promote opportunities in the labor market. Traditionally, the value of a tie is determined primarily by its strength – defined by the duration of the relationship, its emotional intensity, its intimacy and its potential for reciprocity. However, popular conceptions of social capital have not kept pace with workplace transformations. Most studies are based on standard employment in formal organizations and over a long period of time.

Social media analysis of the creative industries can yield interesting insights into today’s networks. A creative practitioner’s network can build reputation and name recognitionjust like theater actors benefit from sharing the stage with a celebrity. Beyond status signaling, networks are a source of camaraderie and community support for professionals in more precarious employment. In effect, anthropologists share found be a common social response to precarious conditions.

Fashion models exemplify independent entrepreneurs in a rapidly changing market marked by fierce competition, global mobility and high turnover. During their work, models travel to fashion markets around the world for short-term jobs. Before the pandemic, for example, some 3,000 to 5,000 models converged on New York Fashion Week each year. These models come together at fashion shows, bond and leave in quick succession.

Are stronger links better?

Throughout the world of modeling, our study, to be published in Social networks, explored the practical implications of the rapidly formed and ephemeral social bonds established through recurring projects. We assessed whether such links can boost careers. We introduced the concept of “transient ties” to capture the recurring, brief, and valuable social ties that exist between arm’s length ties and strong ties. – like the relationships forged in the public space or between taxi drivers and passengers. Transitional ties, although not a new phenomenon, play a prominent role among informal workers today.

We studied networks among models through ethnographic accounts of fashion shows and castings in New York and London and tested the effects of transient ties using a unique longitudinal dataset of career profiles from models spanning a decade. We examined contextual factors leading to transient bond formation and considered broader network effects that may influence models’ careers. With these, we mapped out the career consequences of transient ties in modeling.

In this study, we questioned the importance of time in defining bonds, and more specifically, whether duration, emotional intensity, intimacy, and reciprocity align linearly. Beyond the strength of a bond, we looked at how brief, fleeting relationships can produce meaningful results – a shift that reflects the transformation of the labor market from organization-based work to projects.

Connections that matter

The results showed that transient ties have great practical importance for models, from sharing information to learning through role modeling, attracting caretakers’ attention, and even signaling status. Regardless of a model’s status, media coverage, or affiliation with fashion houses, transient networks have a huge influence on a model’s career success (measured by the number of runway shows a model has made ).

Additionally, we described how the network ecology of transient ties shaped career outcomes. For example, a budding role model’s chance of success increased linearly as she moved from the periphery to the core (initiate) group, but the effects diminished when she was very close to the core of the network.

For gig economy workers to continue to thrive, we need to foster more opportunities for networking and information sharing among them. Understanding the value of transitory ties and the nature of these networks could encourage labor market actors to help each other to densify their networks and obtain mutually beneficial results.

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Research Assistant in Ecological Database Development at FLINDERS UNIVERSITY https://e-jemed.org/research-assistant-in-ecological-database-development-at-flinders-university/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 07:53:28 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/research-assistant-in-ecological-database-development-at-flinders-university/ About Flinders Our bold vision, reflected in our Strategic Plan: Make a Difference: Agenda 2025, is to be internationally recognized as a global research leader, an innovator in contemporary education, and the source of the most enterprising graduates from Australia. To achieve this ambition, we recently made a significant organizational change to a six-college structure […]]]>

About Flinders

Our bold vision, reflected in our Strategic Plan: Make a Difference: Agenda 2025, is to be internationally recognized as a global research leader, an innovator in contemporary education, and the source of the most enterprising graduates from Australia.

To achieve this ambition, we recently made a significant organizational change to a six-college structure with professional alignment of staff and services.

We recognize that the key to our success is exceptional people and we are looking for an exceptional individual to join our transformed university team.

Type of employment:
Fixed term (Fixed term)

Position Summary

Availablity:
Fixed term until December 2023 | Part-time at 0.8 FTE

Compensation:
Higher Education Officer Level 5

Wage scale:
$74,270 – $81,966 (prorated)

Pertaining to:
Dean, People and Resources (or delegate)
Biological Sciences

The research assistant, based at Flinders University, will work in collaboration with several other institutions (e.g. UoW, UTAS, ANU, UQ, Deakin, Australian Museum, etc.) to locate and collect information on: (a ) extant features and recently extinct Australian and New Guinean terrestrial vertebrates, and (b) predator-prey interactions involving top predators among these terrestrial vertebrates. The research assistant will create a comprehensive database that will be hosted on an open web platform according to FAIR data principles and help design and organize workshops and outreach activities based on the trait database/ interactions.

Beyond the importance of the number of species that make up an ecosystem, the collective diversity of all the traits of those species and the interactions that occur between species (themselves determined by traits) give the ecosystem stability and resilience to environmental disturbances such as fires, droughts, invasive species and storms. The measurement of traits and interactions between species is therefore essential to identify the mechanisms involved in extinction events and their wider ecological consequences.

Thanks to global initiatives, the amount of data available on trait-species interactions has increased rapidly over the past two decades. However, the geographic and taxonomic coverage of these data remains patchy, which limits detailed analysis of trait variation and species interactions in certain regions and for certain taxa. If we want to understand past, current and future extinctions in Australia’s unique and diverse biological region, databases containing detailed data on the traits and interactions of extant and recently extinct species (i.e. say of the last 100,000 years) are needed.

Main responsibilities of the position

  • Complete the basic course of the AIATSIS Basic Cultural Learning Program.
  • Collect data on the characteristics of extant or recently extinct mammals, birds, amphibians and reptiles.
  • Development of a stand-alone trait database.
  • Integration of the database in the OCTOPUS platform.
  • Help organize and facilitate workshops to demonstrate the various applications of the database.
  • Develop and disseminate infographics and animated videos promoting the database.
  • Contribute to the preparation of research reports and publications.
  • Liaise with staff, students and external collaborators.
  • Any other responsibilities corresponding to the level of the position assigned by the supervisors.

Capabilities of the key position

Essential criteria

  • Specialized degree in a discipline relevant to ecology, or comparable relevant experience.
  • Trait-based ecology experiment.
  • A commitment to research excellence and attention to detail.
  • Well-developed organizational and analytical skills.
  • Effective communication (verbal and written) and interpersonal skills, including a willingness to engage with external research partners.

Desirable criteriaa

  • Experience in creating databases.
  • Experience in R programming.
  • Demonstrated ability to work effectively as a member of a research team as well as to conduct independent research and lead projects.

Prescribed conditions of employment

  • A valid National Police Certificate satisfactory to the University will also be required before the successful candidate can commence the position.
  • Flinders University has introduced a COVID-19 Vaccination Policy which requires all new staff to be current on their COVID-19 vaccinations, subject to medical exemptions and limited exemptions.

How to register

Please review the core job abilities of the job description and submit a suitability statement of no more than 3 pages that meets the criteria. Applications without a declaration of suitability may not be considered. For more information, please see our How to Apply page.

For more information regarding this position, please contact Dr. Frederik Saltre

Information for applicants:

A valid National Police Certificate satisfactory to the University will also be required before the successful candidate can commence the position.

We seek to increase diversity to improve equal opportunity for employees, and therefore encourage applications from women, persons with disabilities and/or of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent to apply.

Please note that late applications and applications sent through agencies will not be accepted.

Closing of applications at 11:59 p.m.:

November 19, 2022

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