Ecology Jobs – E JEMED http://e-jemed.org/ Fri, 11 Jun 2021 19:58:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://e-jemed.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1-150x150.png Ecology Jobs – E JEMED http://e-jemed.org/ 32 32 Plans for $ 2 billion Washington methanol plant ‘come to an end’ as company terminates lease https://e-jemed.org/plans-for-2-billion-washington-methanol-plant-come-to-an-end-as-company-terminates-lease/ https://e-jemed.org/plans-for-2-billion-washington-methanol-plant-come-to-an-end-as-company-terminates-lease/#respond Fri, 11 Jun 2021 18:26:04 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/plans-for-2-billion-washington-methanol-plant-come-to-an-end-as-company-terminates-lease/ Plans for a more than $ 2 billion methanol plant in southwest Washington are “effectively completed,” according to a statement released Friday by officials at the Port of Kalama because Northwest Innovation Works – which denied a permit by the state this year – will end its site lease. The project, planned for years, suffered […]]]>


Plans for a more than $ 2 billion methanol plant in southwest Washington are “effectively completed,” according to a statement released Friday by officials at the Port of Kalama because Northwest Innovation Works – which denied a permit by the state this year – will end its site lease.

The project, planned for years, suffered a big setback in January when the State Department of Ecology rejected an application for a coastal permit required to build the plant, which was said to have been one of the largest users of Pacific Northwest natural gas.

Northwest Innovation officials, in a statement Friday, said that following the permit denial, “Washington’s regulatory environment has become hazy and unpredictable.”

The statement says the company is evaluating “an appropriate way forward” and is developing other projects, including one to produce hydrogen. The statement did not include information on possible sites for new projects.

The methanol project was first proposed in 2014 and has sparked intense controversy with strong support from many in Southwest Washington for the jobs it would create and strong opposition from environmental groups who cited carbon emissions from natural gas that would be used at the plant.

Early on, the developers said the project would help reduce global greenhouse gases by replacing the coal-based methanol that is created in China in a process that produces significantly more carbon emissions per gallon of product. .

The developers said methanol will be widely used as a raw material in China’s plastics industry.

In 2015, the project appeared to have the backing of Governor Jay Inslee, who called the proposed methanol plant “one of the most innovative clean energy projects in the country.” “

A state study released in December found that the project would have a “high probability” of helping to slow the increase in greenhouse gases around the world.

But in interviews last year, state officials questioned those findings, saying they were based on an analysis of difficult-to-predict future markets. And Laura Watson, director of the state’s ecology department, cited the plant’s greenhouse gas emissions as the reason for rejecting the permit.

“I want to be very clear that a project that would increase greenhouse gas emissions by almost 5 million tonnes (metric) per year would not benefit the environment …” Watson said during the announcement of the state’s decision. “At most, this project would be less damaging than potential alternatives. “

Kalama port officials reacted bitterly on Friday to the cancellation of the lease for a project that would have created 1,400 construction jobs and 200 permanent jobs. They also took a hit on Inslee, who made climate change a central issue in his failed 2020 presidential bid.

In May 2019, Inslee withdrew his support for the methanol project, saying he was no longer convinced it would accomplish what was needed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

His announcement of the change came the day he signed a bill banning the use of hydraulic fracturing to produce natural gas or oil in Washington state. Inslee said at the time that his opposition was not intended to influence the regulatory review of the project.

The change in Inslee embittered those responsible for the port of Kalama.

“It was the kind of innovative, job-creating project that was originally supported by the governor’s office. Jay Inslee stood on the Kalama waterfront to tout the climate benefits of the project and then turned on us when he ran for president, ”said port manager Mark Wilson.

“Unfortunately, this is part of a larger pattern of reluctance to listen to divergent opinions and find balanced and sensible solutions,” said Randy Sweet, chairman of the Kalama Port Commission.

Inslee spokesperson Mike Faulk said on Friday that it was not the policy that changed the governor’s stance on the methanol project, and that in 2019 he provided substantial reasons for taking a new position.

Also on Friday, Columbia Riverkeeper executive director Brett VandenHeuvel said he was inspired by activists across the state, including in Kalama, who spoke out against the project.

“It’s been a long fight, and I think we made the leap in Washington. After many years of fracking coal, oil and gas infrastructure proposals, we look forward to a clean energy future in Washington, ”said VandenHeuvel.



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Over 50 Northwestern US Groups Unveil Green New Deal Vision for Area’s Vital Forests https://e-jemed.org/over-50-northwestern-us-groups-unveil-green-new-deal-vision-for-areas-vital-forests/ https://e-jemed.org/over-50-northwestern-us-groups-unveil-green-new-deal-vision-for-areas-vital-forests/#respond Wed, 09 Jun 2021 20:12:20 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/over-50-northwestern-us-groups-unveil-green-new-deal-vision-for-areas-vital-forests/ More than 50 conservation and climate justice organizations in northern California, Oregon and Washington on Wednesday called on policymakers to preserve the region’s tens of millions of acres of forest land by adopting a Green New Deal for the forests of the Pacific Northwest, a plan consisting of six pillars. aimed at guarding against destructive […]]]>


More than 50 conservation and climate justice organizations in northern California, Oregon and Washington on Wednesday called on policymakers to preserve the region’s tens of millions of acres of forest land by adopting a Green New Deal for the forests of the Pacific Northwest, a plan consisting of six pillars. aimed at guarding against destructive forest fires while mitigating the climate emergency.

“Forest lands in the Pacific Northwest can become essential for extracting carbon from the atmosphere and defending against the worst impacts of climate change, while supporting local economies and rural communities that depend on forest lands. “—50+ conservation groups

“The forests of the Pacific Northwest have the potential to absorb and store as much if not more carbon per acre than any other forest in the world, including the Amazon rainforest,” the organizations said (pdf), calling for a transformation of the forestry industry in accordance with the requirements of the Green New Deal legislation originally introduced in 2019 by Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (DN.Y.) and Senator Ed Markey (D-Mass.).

Greenpeace USA, the Oregon League of Conservation Voters and several locals of the Sunrise Movement are among the groups calling for a just transition away from the forest industry, the main source of carbon emissions in the state of Oregon, a direct cause of the worsening impacts of forest fires; and an industry that has left less than 20% of the region’s forests untapped.

“Forest lands in the Pacific Northwest can become essential for extracting carbon from the atmosphere and defending against the worst impacts of climate change, while supporting local economies and rural communities that depend on forest lands,” said declared the groups.

“The forests of the Pacific Northwest are a world-class natural climate solution,” said local conservation group Cascadia Wildlands. “It’s time we started treating them as such.”

Countering claims by opponents of the Green New Deal, the groups’ plan stressed that abandoning industrial logging is far from a job killer.

As logging companies have maximized their profits and reduced operating costs to the detriment of workers and the rural communities in which they operate, the groups noted that a Green New Deal for Northwestern Forests would secure unionized jobs. in many areas, including outdoor education, road and infrastructure repair, and ecological fire management.

“Hundreds of climatologists and environmentalists are telling policymakers that logging is a major source of carbon emissions and that we need to do more to protect our forests so that they can reduce atmospheric carbon,” said the Dr Chad Hanson, director and senior ecologist of the John Muir Project at the Earth Island Institute. “This goes hand in hand with a just transition, because we know that the true prosperity of rural communities is mainly linked to the protection of forests, not to degradation and exploitation.”

The proposal demonstrates that “there is no reason rural communities should have to choose between prioritizing forest ecosystems or having a robust economy – we can have both,” the organizations said.

The six pillars of the Green New Deal for the forests of the Pacific Northwest are:

  1. Use the potential of the forests of the Pacific Northwest as a climate solution by shifting to practices that sequester and store carbon, including “implementing new guidelines and incentives for landowners to practice pro-afforestation.” . [and conserving] old and untapped forests for climate change mitigation ”;
  2. Transform industrial forestry practices on private lands by ending subsidies and tax breaks for private landowners and logging companies, investing instead in rural education, infrastructure and other non-forestry jobs;
  3. Empower frontline and marginalized communities by ensuring that “tribes, migrants and rural communities benefit from stronger legal protections, economic opportunities, safe working conditions and community services independent of business or logging revenues ”and that“ Indigenous sacred and cultural sites on federal public lands are fully protected and accessible to Indigenous peoples for cultural practices ”;
  4. Raise the standard of living of forest-dependent communities through a federal employment guarantee;
  5. Invest in communities by redirecting forestry subsidies towards protecting ecosystems and repairing past damage by industry and by injecting funds into rural infrastructure, including broadband and transport; and
  6. Act on the best available science by explicitly rejecting “false solutions peddled by the extractive industry”, including uncontrolled logging.

“If done right, a Green New Deal will simultaneously alleviate the climate crisis, transform our national (and global) economy, tackle issues of social, racial, economic and environmental injustice, protect natural ecosystems and create millions of well-paying union jobs, “the plan says.” To do this, we must demand bold vision from leaders at both community and national level; a desire to truly reinvent all aspects of our economy to create a society based on the principles of solidarity and ecology instead of competition and extraction. “

“By reinventing our relationship with the forests of the Pacific Northwest, we can not only alleviate the climate crisis, but also build a future for our region based on economic, racial and environmental justice. “—Green New Deal for Pacific Northwest Forests

In addition to supporting community economies, the Green New Deal for Pacific Northwest Forests would protect millions of people in rural communities by reducing the risk and severity of wildfires, which have destroyed 10.3 million. unprecedented acres in 2020.

“The climate crisis, which is in part due to industrial logging, increases the risk and severity of forest fires,” the organizations said. “Industrial logging also directly increases the impacts of forest fires due to the resulting monoculture tree plantations, which allow fires to burn more severely and spread faster. On the other hand, forests with a higher degree of protection have a lower risk of forest fires. “

Michael Beasely, fire behavior analyst and retired fire chief in California’s Inyo National Forest, said the plan would allow “disadvantaged workers to be true heroes in the eyes of rural communities as they go. reduce fuel consumption near homes and infrastructure where it matters most, in the home ignition zone. “

“In turn, forests can be allowed to perform the full range of ecosystem services, sequestering carbon and clean water, most importantly, while allowing the rewilding of more remote areas, with ecosystem processes intact. like natural fires, ”Stupidly said.

Adopting a Green New Deal for the forests of the Pacific Northwest would allow the region to meet the bold emission reduction targets needed to alleviate the climate emergency while centering a just transition for workers and workers. communities, the organizations said, stressing that “we don’t have to wait for any new technological advancement or large-scale investment in facilities to do this. “

“The means to remove significant amounts of carbon already exist in the woodlands of our country,” says the plan. “By reinventing our relationship with the forests of the Pacific Northwest, we can not only alleviate the climate crisis, but also build a future for our region based on economic, racial and environmental justice. “



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Guest comment: Protecting Cayo Costa’s natural beauty | News, Sports, Jobs https://e-jemed.org/guest-comment-protecting-cayo-costas-natural-beauty-news-sports-jobs/ https://e-jemed.org/guest-comment-protecting-cayo-costas-natural-beauty-news-sports-jobs/#respond Wed, 09 Jun 2021 04:18:45 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/guest-comment-protecting-cayo-costas-natural-beauty-news-sports-jobs/ Bob Rando. PHOTO PROVIDED Cayo Costa State Park is considered one of the best bombing beaches in the world. With nine miles of beach, acres of pine forests, and over six miles of trails, visitors can enjoy shelling, fishing, birding, and snorkeling on this beautiful barrier island. For many, Cayo Costa is a rare experience. […]]]>


Bob Rando. PHOTO PROVIDED

Cayo Costa State Park is considered one of the best bombing beaches in the world. With nine miles of beach, acres of pine forests, and over six miles of trails, visitors can enjoy shelling, fishing, birding, and snorkeling on this beautiful barrier island.

For many, Cayo Costa is a rare experience. Accessible only by boat, the island is both a piece of history and a slice of paradise, a place where visitors come to appreciate the majesty of native wildlife and miles of undeveloped shoreline.

Captiva Cruises has a long history of partnering with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection since 1994 to share this unique barrier island with visitors and our community. In 2013, Captiva Cruises became the Official DEP State Dealer.

Captiva Cruises offers bombing tours to the southern end of Cayo Costa, averaging 34 visitors per day over the past five years through two daily trips offered Monday through Saturday. After Hurricane Charley damaged the original south wharf in 2004, we were proud to help rebuild and reopen the state-owned wharf in 2016, a resource that is now available for public use.

Since its inception in 1986, Captiva Cruises has been committed to maintaining a culture of good stewardship for the islands and the environment. We have a long-standing partnership with the Sanibel Captiva Conservation Foundation, partnering with No Child Left On Shore to bring underprivileged children to the southern end of Cayo Costa, where they learn about the Barrier Island ecology and the wildlife. Some of these children have never seen a beach or set foot in the sand before.

Captiva Cruises also supports the Friends of Cayo Costa State Park, partners with the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife to transport injured wildlife to their Sanibel clinic from the island, and volunteers with our ships, crew and our families during the coastal clean-up days in Cayo Costa.

Yet recent media coverage has targeted Captiva Cruises, fearing that our excursions could potentially harm the environment, and a citizen group is asking DEP to prevent Captiva Cruises from accessing the island’s south wharf.

One of the group’s main goals is to end commercial use of the south wharf and make this single-boat wharf available only for private use, ultimately limiting public access. Captiva Cruises uses the south wharf to provide access to people who would otherwise not be able to afford it.

Unfortunately, erroneous information was published and we realized we needed to better educate stakeholders, including Cayo Costa owners, of our proactive efforts to protect Cayo Costa.

If you visit Cayo Costa aboard Captiva Cruises, you will experience firsthand how we celebrate the island’s natural environment by educating about the native wildlife, the unique ecosystem, and the importance of preserving its natural beauty.

Our staff are trained to provide informative lectures that review best practices for respecting the areas we visit. Our guides watch the beaches throughout our bombing tours. While the south end of the island does not offer amenities, we do provide an onboard bathroom and trash cans to use throughout our half day tour. We also use boats specially designed to navigate in shallow waters to limit the impact on local waterways, seagrass beds and the habitat surrounding Cayo Costa.

In addition to our environmental efforts, Captiva Cruises has donated a percentage of ferry revenues to the state to help subsidize fleet management as well as $ 100,000 for fleet capital improvements since 2013.

Moving to the north wharf would eliminate half-day trips and therefore significantly reduce the number of visitors able to experience this state park. Additionally, it would force the state to expand mooring, personnel, and tram services to the northern end.

For 25 years, our excursions have shared this natural resource with people who otherwise would not be exposed to this unique destination. Preserving Cayo Costa is essential, as is protecting public access. The two can coexist.

– Bob Rando is co-owner of Captiva Cruises.



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High Seas treaty can help preserve healthy oceans for generations to come https://e-jemed.org/high-seas-treaty-can-help-preserve-healthy-oceans-for-generations-to-come/ https://e-jemed.org/high-seas-treaty-can-help-preserve-healthy-oceans-for-generations-to-come/#respond Tue, 08 Jun 2021 14:35:20 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/high-seas-treaty-can-help-preserve-healthy-oceans-for-generations-to-come/ Doug McCauley Growing up, Doug McCauley loved the sea so much that he worked as a fisherman throughout high school and during the summers while studying at the University of California at Berkeley. Today, McCauley, assistant professor of ecology, evolution and marine biology at the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB), is a leading […]]]>


Doug McCauley

Growing up, Doug McCauley loved the sea so much that he worked as a fisherman throughout high school and during the summers while studying at the University of California at Berkeley. Today, McCauley, assistant professor of ecology, evolution and marine biology at the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB), is a leading scholar in ocean conservation, ecology and science Datas.

Most recently, he led a team of scientists commissioned by The Pew Charitable Trusts to identify marine areas of outstanding biological and ecological value, which resulted in the report. A path towards the creation of the first generation of protected areas in the high seas.

This interview has been edited for clarity and length.

Q: What is your earliest memory of the ocean?

A: Catch a fish on a pier. A Pacific mackerel. While the others on the pier weren’t necessarily in awe, this experience connected me to a strange underwater world full of savagery that I immediately fell in love with and really wanted to understand better.

Q: How did this first experience shape your career as a scientist?

A: My science today is still trying to ensure that the wilderness and beauty that I bonded to as a child – and that fed me and helped pay the bills as a young adult – remain alive and healthy in our ocean for many more generations.

Q: Why should people care more about the health of our global ocean?

A: He gives us every breath we take. You could start and end the answer here, I guess.

Q: But there is more.

A: Right. The ocean is also our refrigerator full of wild foods raised in the wild, a tremendous source of beauty and inspiration in our lives, and an important source of employment and wealth for communities like mine.

I think we also don’t realize how intimately our own health is related to the health of the ocean. Take nutrition, for example: Seafood is the only true source of quality nutrition for hundreds of millions of people and helps prevent many serious illnesses associated with malnutrition in children and adults.

Q: One of the most important ocean conservation efforts underway is to enter into a legally binding treaty to protect the high seas, the vast expanses of ocean that are not under the jurisdiction of any particular country. What can you tell us about life on the high seas?

A: My team and I at UCSB have had the privilege of participating in a truly exciting effort with scientists from 13 universities and institutions to answer the question of which areas of the high seas should be protected first. We’ve synthesized information from over 20 billion data points on ocean wildlife and how people use the ocean to try to find high seas biodiversity hotspots worth protecting. We were delighted to find oases of ocean life in many areas of the high seas. And they were special for different reasons: some were underwater mountains covered with corals, others were mecca for whales and turtles. , and some were rare, species-rich shallow-water coral reefs and seagrass meadows that sprang up out of nowhere in the middle of the high seas.

Doug McCauley, carrying his gear to Padaro Beach in Santa Barbara County, California, uses drones and artificial intelligence to predict great white shark activity to inform conservation efforts and help coastal communities to enjoy the ocean safely.
Doug McCauley

Q: The idea of ​​marine protected areas, or MPAs, on the high seas is that they can improve ocean health while still supporting communities where livelihoods depend on a thriving marine environment. Is it correct?

A: High seas MPAs act like underwater savings accounts. Within an MPA, protected populations, such as fish, thrive and grow. And these healthy and expanding populations are spilling over the boundaries of the MPA itself into areas where these fish can be fished, such as savings account interest. Thus, MPAs become a victory for both people and biodiversity.

Q: What does this mean governments should be doing, especially now?

A: The high seas are more and more busy every year. So, I think governments need to pay special attention to the need for high seas MPAs. We currently have a special opportunity to create high seas protected areas in some spectacular parts of our ocean, which would bring significant benefits. But if we wait too long, some of these options for maximizing the benefits of marine protection will be lost.

Q: From your perspective as a scientist, what should negotiators keep in mind when working on finalizing the text of a high seas treaty?

A: I think sometimes there is a misconception that we do not yet have enough data to be bold in our political actions in this treaty. As a scientist, I feel confident to say that this is simply not the case. Decades of high seas research and sophisticated ocean modeling and remote observation techniques have put at our disposal a vast amount of knowledge to intelligently find and protect the most important parts of our high seas. New technologies will enable us. also to observe this space relatively inexpensively; it means that we can realistically apply all the provisions of the treaty in a way that would not have been possible a few years ago. I hope negotiators take inspiration from the fact that they have this vast reservoir of new information on their side, as well as the support of scientists, and act boldly as they finalize this important treaty. crucial.

Q: What if they do?

A: A strong treaty for high seas biodiversity prepares us for a win-win: we protect biodiversity responsibly; the benefits of this protection help us fight food insecurity and develop our blue economy on the high seas; and it helps us harness the power of healthy oceans to fight climate change. Success stories like this are rare. This is a truly unique opportunity to do something of lasting significance for our planet and its people.



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Aravalli encroachment in Faridabad: residents demand rehabilitation, action against those responsible https://e-jemed.org/aravalli-encroachment-in-faridabad-residents-demand-rehabilitation-action-against-those-responsible/ https://e-jemed.org/aravalli-encroachment-in-faridabad-residents-demand-rehabilitation-action-against-those-responsible/#respond Mon, 07 Jun 2021 17:18:35 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/aravalli-encroachment-in-faridabad-residents-demand-rehabilitation-action-against-those-responsible/ After the Supreme Court on Monday ordered the eviction of thousands of slum dwellers encroaching on the Aravalli forest area in Faridabad district, residents are demanding temporary rehabilitation and action against those who sold them land he decades ago. As many as 10,000 homes are expected to be demolished as a result of the order, […]]]>


After the Supreme Court on Monday ordered the eviction of thousands of slum dwellers encroaching on the Aravalli forest area in Faridabad district, residents are demanding temporary rehabilitation and action against those who sold them land he decades ago. As many as 10,000 homes are expected to be demolished as a result of the order, residents said.

Biram Kumar, a resident of the village, said: “The authorities carried out demolition campaigns in September of last year and in April of this year as well, but the people who live here are mostly those who worked in the villages. mines and have nowhere to go. After mining stopped, they started working as day laborers and construction workers, bought small plots here, and built houses.

“If the whole process was illegal, then the land shouldn’t have been sold to them. Now these residents have no savings and will soon be homeless. Authorities should take action against those who have been implicated in duping slum dwellers, ”Kumar said.

After 300 homes were demolished in April, residents of Khori village sought protection from the Supreme Court, demanding rehabilitation before their homes were demolished. On April 6, the Association for the Welfare of Residents of Khori Gaon also held a day of peaceful protest outside the office of Faridabad Municipality Commissioner and Deputy Commissioner.

The lands in question are notified under Special Sections 4 and 5 of the Punjab Land Preservation Act (PLPA), which extends protection against land-use change to certain specified areas, forests and trees of Aravalli. According to Supreme Court guidelines, PLPA is protected under the Forest Conservation Act of 1980, which states that “no state government or other authority may, except with prior approval from the central government, make an order ordering or any part of it can be used for non-forestry purposes.

Nirmal Gorana, the general secretary of Bandhu Mukti Morcha, an organization which defends the cause of the inhabitants, said: “The orders of the Supreme Court must be respected by the state government, but they must first understand its responsibility. and provide temporary rehabilitation within two weeks, before demolishing their (villagers) homes.

“These people are already suffering the full brunt of the second wave of Covid-19 and many are losing their jobs and now, with this order, they will no longer have a place to live. We call on the state government to ensure the rehabilitation of all families in Khori village, ”Gorana said.

When asked if the rehabilitation would be provided to residents, Garima Mittal, commissioner of the Municipal Corporation of Faridabad, said: “We will follow the orders of the Supreme Court. We are reviewing the details and taking action accordingly. ”

The official did not make it clear whether authorities plan to rehabilitate the residents.

Meanwhile, environmentalists hailed the move and said even on a small scale, encroachments by the Aravalli must be removed.

Sunil Harsana, wildlife researcher and resident of Faridabad, said: “All encroachments by Aravalli should be removed as they are harmful to the ecology. We cannot determine whether this will affect the poor or the rich, because environmental degradation is the cost we are paying here. “



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St. Paul Police Arrest Shooting Man https://e-jemed.org/st-paul-police-arrest-shooting-man/ https://e-jemed.org/st-paul-police-arrest-shooting-man/#respond Sat, 05 Jun 2021 20:06:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/st-paul-police-arrest-shooting-man/ 04 June 2021 LUMBERTON – Nearly 600 graduates representing three high schools in Robeson County crossed the stage on Friday and entered a new phase of their lives. Red Springs, Fairmont and St. Pauls High Schools were the last schools in the Robeson County Public School System to hold each of the graduation ceremonies commemorating […]]]>



LUMBERTON – Nearly 600 graduates representing three high schools in Robeson County crossed the stage on Friday and entered a new phase of their lives.

Red Springs, Fairmont and St. Pauls High Schools were the last schools in the Robeson County Public School System to hold each of the graduation ceremonies commemorating the Class of 2021. Graduation Ceremonies at Purnell Swett High Schools and Lumberton are scheduled to take place at 9 a.m. on Saturday. am in each of the school gymnasiums.

During the Red Springs graduation ceremony, where a total of 186 seniors graduated, the school principal passionately reminded the students of the series of trials they faced and warned them many more to come.

“You will have various seasons and periods of competition that you will have to face and survive,” said Jamal Campbell. “During these contrasting seasons, you will develop a character and stamina that will have the ability to bring out the best in you.

“At times like these, you will need the essentials to help you get through and maintain your focus on achieving your goals.”

The main thing is love, faith and family.

“These essential elements of love, faith and family will be integral to your success and the motivator that keeps you moving every day,” said Campbell.

The director of the Red Devils quoted former President John F. Kennedy as saying, “We need to use time as a tool and not as a challenge. “

“I encourage you to be productive, to seize the moment, to move forward and not to back down,” Campbell said.

The graduates of Fairmont High School were celebrated in a ceremony at 10 a.m. in the school gymnasium.

There were around 163 students set to graduate on Friday, but five to six students said they would not be able to attend the ceremony, principal Kent Prater said.

Deputy principal Justin Dial said he had been in school for three years and had attended three different styles of graduation ceremonies. The degrees went from the Givens Performing Arts Center at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke in 2019 to the high school parking lot for a drive-through ceremony last year.

And weather concerns on Friday forced the ceremony to be moved from the football field to the gymnasium, where the capacity limit reduced the number of guests each student could invite from six to four, Prater said.

Dial said the students overcame many obstacles and was proud of their accomplishments.

“They triumphed in difficult times,” said Dial. “I am proud of them and I hope they carry that same mindset throughout their lives.”

Jacob Hunt’s mother and grandparents were eager to celebrate with him on Friday.

His mother, Cassandra Hunt, said it took a long time for her to graduate and that she was thrilled her son was reaching the academic milestone.

“It’s nothing but a blessing,” she said.

Kevin Oxendine, whose daughter Jalyn graduated on Friday, said he praised graduates with the “most comprehensive” degree for their work this year.

“They survived the obstacles and I’m proud of them,” he said.

Senior Class Representative Tyler Jackson made the invocation and Senior Class Treasurer Shekinah Lennon welcomed graduates, their families and others at the ceremony. Senior Class President Kiley Oxendine gave a speech in which she encouraged her peers and recognized their efforts to complete the school year, even taking online classes.

“We have faced the daily struggle of the Internet connection,” Oxendine said.

In the end, she shared words that she and her peers could take with them beyond the school grounds.

“I ask each of you to follow your own dreams and your own passions,” she said.

Oxendine also told graduates to “put God first in everything you do.”

The graduation ceremony wasn’t just about student achievement, Prater said.

“It’s also a day to honor those who have helped you along the way,” said the director.

He spoke of coaches, family, friends and others who helped students graduate.

“They were there with you every step of the way,” Prater said.

He then invited the graduates to stand up and thank these people for their contributions with applause and cheers.

Then the parents took turns to encourage the 2021 class.

Parents also shared tips for graduates.

“Live life to the fullest; go strong and hard as you can,” Oxendine said.

“Congratulations. Keep aiming for the stars, and you have a lot of people praying for you and wishing you well,” Hunt said.

The 193 graduates of St. Pauls High School had not backed down in the face of adversity, said one of the school’s vice-principals, Eric Sanders.

“These guys have faced some of the biggest challenges of their lives,” he said.

One of those challenges was not being in touch with certain classmates since their second year.

“We are proud of them; we are proud of the number of graduates today; we are proud of the response from parents and the community who have stepped forward, ”said Sanders.

Mary McLaughlin started working as a data manager at St. Pauls High School four years ago when the class of 2021 entered school in grade one.

“This is my first class when I got here at St. Pauls High School,” she said. “They’ve been through so much. It has been a difficult year. It’s just a joyous occasion.

The data manager was on the verge of tears as he watched the students “walk through the big picture”.

“I got to watch them grow up,” McLaughlin said. “I feel like this mother watching all of them. They are like my babies.

Graduate Shamere Cotton had the support of her parents and sister during the ceremony on Saturday.

Her mother, Cathy McLaurin, knew firsthand the challenges her daughter faced in her senior year.

“It was a proud moment because it was really a struggle,” said McLaurin. “She didn’t like being in this house and not going to school, but I’m glad she held on.”

Cotton said that while adapting to virtual learning was difficult, there were a few bright spots to take away.

“For the most part, it was fun,” Cotton said.

College is the next step for the new St. Pauls alumnus, but she still doesn’t know which college to attend.



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State officials urge teens to drive safely during deadliest days of the year https://e-jemed.org/state-officials-urge-teens-to-drive-safely-during-deadliest-days-of-the-year/ https://e-jemed.org/state-officials-urge-teens-to-drive-safely-during-deadliest-days-of-the-year/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 20:43:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/state-officials-urge-teens-to-drive-safely-during-deadliest-days-of-the-year/ 04 June 2021 LUMBERTON – Nearly 600 graduates representing three high schools in Robeson County crossed the stage on Friday and entered a new phase of their lives. Red Springs, Fairmont and St. Pauls High Schools were the last schools in the Robeson County public school system to hold each of the graduation ceremonies commemorating […]]]>



LUMBERTON – Nearly 600 graduates representing three high schools in Robeson County crossed the stage on Friday and entered a new phase of their lives.

Red Springs, Fairmont and St. Pauls High Schools were the last schools in the Robeson County public school system to hold each of the graduation ceremonies commemorating the Class of 2021. Graduation Ceremonies at Purnell Swett High Schools and Lumberton are scheduled to take place at 10 a.m. on Saturday. am in each of the school gymnasiums.

During the Red Springs graduation ceremony, where a total of 186 seniors graduated, the school principal passionately reminded the students of the series of trials they faced and warned them many more to come.

“You will have various seasons and periods of competition that you will have to face and survive,” said Jamal Campbell. “During these contrasting seasons, you will develop a character and stamina that will have the ability to bring out the best in you.

“At times like these, you will need the essentials to help you get through and maintain your focus on achieving your goals.”

The main thing is love, faith and family.

“These essential elements of love, faith and family will be integral to your success and the motivator that keeps you moving every day,” said Campbell.

The director of the Red Devils quoted former President John F. Kennedy as saying, “We need to use time as a tool and not as a challenge. “

“I encourage you to be productive, to seize the moment, to move forward and not to back down,” Campbell said.

The graduates of Fairmont High School were celebrated in a ceremony at 10 a.m. in the school gymnasium.

There were around 163 students set to graduate on Friday, but five to six students said they would not be able to attend the ceremony, principal Kent Prater said.

Deputy principal Justin Dial said he had been in school for three years and had attended three different styles of graduation ceremonies. The degrees went from the Givens Performing Arts Center at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke in 2019 to the high school parking lot for a drive-through ceremony last year.

And weather concerns on Friday forced the ceremony to be moved from the football field to the gymnasium, where the capacity limit reduced the number of guests each student could invite from six to four, Prater said.

Dial said the students overcame many obstacles and was proud of their accomplishments.

“They triumphed in difficult times,” said Dial. “I am proud of them and I hope they carry that same mindset throughout their lives.”

Jacob Hunt’s mother and grandparents were eager to celebrate with him on Friday.

His mother, Cassandra Hunt, said it took a long time for her to graduate and that she was thrilled her son was reaching the academic milestone.

“It’s nothing but a blessing,” she said.

Kevin Oxendine, whose daughter Jalyn graduated on Friday, said he praised graduates with the “most comprehensive” degree for their work this year.

“They survived the obstacles and I’m proud of them,” he said.

Senior Class Representative Tyler Jackson made the invocation and Senior Class Treasurer Shekinah Lennon welcomed graduates, their families and others at the ceremony. Senior Class President Kiley Oxendine gave a speech in which she encouraged her peers and recognized their efforts to complete the school year, even taking online classes.

“We have faced the daily struggle of the Internet connection,” Oxendine said.

In the end, she shared words that she and her peers could take with them beyond the school grounds.

“I ask each of you to follow your own dreams and your own passions,” she said.

Oxendine also told graduates to “put God first in everything you do.”

The graduation ceremony wasn’t just about student achievement, Prater said.

“It’s also a day to honor those who have helped you along the way,” said the director.

He spoke of coaches, family, friends and others who helped students graduate.

“They were there with you every step of the way,” Prater said.

He then invited the graduates to stand up and thank these people for their contributions with applause and cheers.

Then the parents took turns to encourage the 2021 class.

Parents also shared tips for graduates.

“Live life to the fullest; go strong and hard as you can,” Oxendine said.

“Congratulations. Keep aiming for the stars, and you have a lot of people praying for you and wishing you well,” Hunt said.

The 193 graduates of St. Pauls High School had not backed down in the face of adversity, said one of the school’s vice-principals, Eric Sanders.

“These guys have faced some of the biggest challenges of their lives,” he said.

One of those challenges was not being in touch with certain classmates since their second year.

“We are proud of them; we are proud of the number of graduates today; we are proud of the response from parents and the community who have stepped forward, ”said Sanders.

Mary McLaughlin started working as a data manager at St. Pauls High School four years ago when the class of 2021 entered school in grade one.

“This is my first class when I got here at St. Pauls High School,” she said. “They’ve been through so much. It has been a difficult year. It’s just a joyous occasion.

The data manager was on the verge of tears as he watched the students “walk through the big picture”.

“I got to watch them grow up,” McLaughlin said. “I feel like this mother watching all of them. They are like my babies.

Graduate Shamere Cotton had the support of her parents and sister during the ceremony on Saturday.

Her mother, Cathy McLaurin, knew firsthand the challenges her daughter faced in her senior year.

“It was a proud moment because it was really a struggle,” said McLaurin. “She didn’t like being in this house and not going to school, but I’m glad she held on.”

Cotton said that while adapting to virtual learning was difficult, there were a few bright spots to take away.

“For the most part, it was fun,” Cotton said.

College is the next step for the new St. Pauls alumnus, but she still doesn’t know which college to attend.



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The new geopolitics of world trade https://e-jemed.org/the-new-geopolitics-of-world-trade/ https://e-jemed.org/the-new-geopolitics-of-world-trade/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 19:02:39 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/the-new-geopolitics-of-world-trade/ June 5, 2021 TTWENTY YEARS As of this week, the share price of a startup led by an obsessive man called Jeff Bezos has fallen 71% year over year. Amazon’s near-death experience was part of the dotcom crash that exposed the pride of Silicon Valley and, along with the $ 14 billion fraud at Enron, […]]]>


TTWENTY YEARS As of this week, the share price of a startup led by an obsessive man called Jeff Bezos has fallen 71% year over year. Amazon’s near-death experience was part of the dotcom crash that exposed the pride of Silicon Valley and, along with the $ 14 billion fraud at Enron, shattered trust in American businesses. China, meanwhile, was struggling to privatize its creaky state-owned enterprises, and there were few signs that it could create a culture of entrepreneurship. Instead, the bright hope was in Europe, where a new single currency promised to catalyze a giant, business-friendly integrated market.

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Creative destruction often makes predictions silly, but even by those standards the post-pandemic business world is radically different from what you might expect two decades ago. Tech companies make up a quarter of the global stock market, and the geographic distribution has become remarkably unbalanced. America and, increasingly, China are on the rise, accounting for 76 of the 100 most valuable companies in the world. The European count has gone from 41 in 2000 to 15 today.

This imbalance largely reflects American and Chinese skills, and complacency in Europe and elsewhere. This raises two giant questions: why did this happen? And can it last?

By themselves, big companies are no better than small ones. The status of Japan Inc skyrocketed in the 1980s only to collapse. Large companies can be a sign of success, but also of laziness. Saudi Aramco, the world’s second most valued company, is not so much a symbol of $ 2 billion vigor as a desert kingdom’s dangerous dependence on fossil fuels. Even so, the right kind of giant business is a sign of a healthy business ecology in which large, efficient companies are created and constantly swept aside by competition. This is the secret to raising the standard of living in the long run.

One way to capture the dominance of America and China is to compare their share of global output with their share of business activity (defined as the average of their share in global market capitalization, proceeds from public offerings, venture capital funding, “unicorns” – or larger private startups and the world’s top 100 companies). By this yardstick, America accounts for 24% of GDP, but 48% of commercial activity. China represents 18% of GDP, and 20% of turnover. Other countries, with 77% of the world’s population, strike well below their weight.

Part of the explanation is the opportunity wasted by Europe. Political interference and the debt crisis in 2010-12 blocked the continent’s economic integration. Companies have largely failed to anticipate the transition to the intangible economy. Europe has no startups to compete with Amazon or Google. But other countries have also struggled. Ten years ago, Brazil, Mexico and India were on the verge of creating a vast cohort of global companies. Few have emerged.

Instead, only America and China were able to organize the process of creative destruction. Of the 19 companies created over the past 25 years that are now worth more than $ 100 billion, nine are in the United States and eight are in China. Europe does not have one. Even as mature tech giants like Apple and Alibaba attempt to consolidate their dominance, a new set of tech companies including Snap, PayPal, Meituan and Pinduoduo are reaching critical mass. The pandemic has seen a surge of energy in America and China and a fundraising boom. Companies from both countries dominate the frontier of new technologies such as fintech and electric cars.

The magic formula contains many ingredients. A large internal market helps businesses grow quickly. Deep capital markets, venture capitalist networks, and top universities keep the startup pipeline full. There is a culture that exalts entrepreneurs. Chinese tycoons brag about their “996” work ethic: 9:00 am to 9:00 pm, six days a week. Elon Musk sleeps in the Tesla factory. Above all, politics supports creative destruction. America has long tolerated more disruption than comfortable Europe. After 2000, Chinese leaders let entrepreneurs run wild and laid off 8 million employees in state-owned enterprises.

The recent erosion of this political consensus in the two countries is one of the reasons why this domination could prove to be unsustainable. Americans worry about national decline, as well as low wages and monopolies (about a quarter of S&P 500 deserves an antitrust review, we estimated in 2018). The Economist supports the Biden administration’s goal of promoting competition and extending the social safety net to protect workers affected by disruption. But the danger is that America will continue to drift towards protectionism, industrial policy and, on the left, punitive taxes on capital, which hamper its commercial dynamism.

In China, President Xi Jinping sees large private companies as a threat to the power and social stability of the Communist Party. The fear of tycoons started last year with Jack Ma, Alibaba’s co-founder, and has since spread to the bosses of three other big tech companies. While party officials seek to “guide” incumbent private companies to achieve political goals, such as national self-sufficiency in certain technologies, they are also more likely to shield them from free-wheeling competitors.

The more America and China intervene, the more the rest of the world should worry about the unbalanced geography of world trade. In theory, the nationality of for-profit companies doesn’t matter: as long as they sell competitive products and create jobs, whatever? But if companies are influenced by national governments, the math changes.

As globalization unfolds, feuds are already erupting over where multinational companies produce vaccines, set digital rules and pay taxes. Europe’s hopes of being a regulatory superpower can turn into a fig leaf for protectionism. Others with less influence may erect barriers. To assert its sovereignty, India has banned Chinese social media and hampered US e-commerce companies. It’s the worst of both worlds, depriving local consumers of global innovations and creating barriers that make it even harder for local businesses to grow.

It’s the acorns, not the oaks

It would be a tragedy if only two countries in the world were able to sustain a process of large-scale creative destruction. But it would be even worse if they turned away from it, and other places admitted defeat and put up barricades. The best guarantee of success will be if, in 20 years, the list of the largest companies in the world does not resemble the one today.

This article appeared in the Leaders section of the print edition under the title “Geopolitics and business”



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Summer Reading Kick Off Begins County Library Events Calendar https://e-jemed.org/summer-reading-kick-off-begins-county-library-events-calendar/ https://e-jemed.org/summer-reading-kick-off-begins-county-library-events-calendar/#respond Thu, 03 Jun 2021 22:09:35 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/summer-reading-kick-off-begins-county-library-events-calendar/ The Midland County Public Library will host a summer reading launch for Tails and Tales from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at the Centennial Library. Readers are divided into four clubs: Listeners, Emerging Readers, Readers, and Teens. Participants who complete the program as listeners, emerging readers and readers will be entered into raffles to […]]]>


The Midland County Public Library will host a summer reading launch for Tails and Tales from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at the Centennial Library.

Readers are divided into four clubs: Listeners, Emerging Readers, Readers, and Teens. Participants who complete the program as listeners, emerging readers and readers will be entered into raffles to win a new bike. Teens who complete the program will be entered into a raffle to win a Kindle Fire.

The library will be offering other prizes, special programs and performances throughout the summer to help young readers pursue their goals. Participants can register at midland.readsquared.com.


The Summer Reading Program is made possible by the Midland County Public Library Foundation, Carnegie Circle and Midland Friends of Libraries and Literacy.

More events

–Will Parker, 2 p.m., Monday at the Centennial Library. Children’s songwriter Will Parker plays guitar and harmonica and sings original songs that encourage interaction and creativity with young children.

–Science Spectrum, 10:30 a.m. June 18 at the Centennial Library and 1:30 p.m. June 18 at the Downtown Library. Learn about animals native to West Texas and eastern New Mexico, including snakes, lizards, insects, and mammals, during a hands-on demonstration from Lubbock-based Science Spectrum.

–Lucas Miller, July 12 at both libraries. Lucas Miller is a singing zoologist who gets kids excited about science with songwriting and puppetry. The high-energy performances address scientific themes based on the curriculum, including life cycles, ocean ecology, and Texas ecosystems.

–Elizabeth Ellis, July 20 in both libraries. Award-winning storyteller Elizabeth Ellis has been sharing stories with children and adults for more than four decades in schools, libraries and storytelling festivals.

–Harlin Rhoades, July 29 at Centennial Park. Local children’s entertainer Harlin Rhoades has been having fun with his magic shows and hot air balloons for over 25 years. Its shows are entertaining while incorporating relevant topics such as bullying, character building and the importance of reading.

–Outspoken Bean, July 30 at the Centennial Library. Poet, writer and mentor Emanuele Bean presents a one-man show to engage audiences in a conversation about mistakes, redemption and the power of words.

–Library Lunches will take place from noon to 1 p.m. weekdays from June 8 to July 30 at the downtown library. Children 18 and under eat free.

-The “Let’s Play Railway” exhibition will be visible until August 21 at the Centennial Library.

–West Texas Master Gardeners: Trees, 10 a.m. June 15 at the Centennial Library. Learn how trees were used to create railroads.

–Transportation week, June 21-24 at 10 a.m. at the Centennial Library. Meet members of the community who depend on vehicles like fire trucks, police cars and more to do their jobs.



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New report shows shape of urban growth underlies livability and sustainable growth https://e-jemed.org/new-report-shows-shape-of-urban-growth-underlies-livability-and-sustainable-growth/ https://e-jemed.org/new-report-shows-shape-of-urban-growth-underlies-livability-and-sustainable-growth/#respond Wed, 02 Jun 2021 23:00:58 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/new-report-shows-shape-of-urban-growth-underlies-livability-and-sustainable-growth/ The predominance of fossil fuels in urban energy supply puts cities at the forefront of climate change. Cities account for around 75% of global primary energy consumption and are responsible for 70% of energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, making them key players in national and global efforts to move to a net zero future. Cities […]]]>


The predominance of fossil fuels in urban energy supply puts cities at the forefront of climate change. Cities account for around 75% of global primary energy consumption and are responsible for 70% of energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, making them key players in national and global efforts to move to a net zero future.

Cities can catalyze the shift to a low-carbon future

A new report released today by IRENA outlines ways in which cities can catalyze the transition to a low-carbon future – in turn supporting regional and national governments in achieving sustainable energy goals and achieving sustainable energy goals. achievement of global climate goals. Cities can be targets, planners and regulators. They often own and therefore operate municipal infrastructure. Cities are still direct consumers of energy and therefore aggregators of demand, and can be facilitators and financiers of renewable energy projects.

Renewable energy policies for cities also presents case studies of small and medium-sized towns in various regions, demonstrating that cities are already taking responsibility. The examples of China, Costa Rica and Uganda show that despite limited access to finance and political support, the clear benefits of sustainable energy in an urban context have inspired action.

Solar power in Kasese, Uganda

In Kasese, Uganda, for example, the municipality recognized its great potential for solar power, which in turn led to the implementation of the Kasese Municipal Sustainable Energy Strategy in 2017. IRENA contributed to Kasese’s journey in deploying solar energy with his SolarCityEngine, an app to help households, businesses and municipal authorities assess the prospects for producing electricity using solar photovoltaic energy (PV) on the roofs. The online simulator allowed the municipality to assess the costs of the incentives, affordability and the total volume of investments.

A set of policy measures then followed, which included efforts to attract investment, programs to train households and small businesses to deploy a solar home system, and outreach activities to ensure acceptance by residents. As a result, the people of Kasese have embraced the deployment of solar photovoltaic energy in their city, including in their homes. The switch from polluting kerosene lamps to clean solar power has improved the health of many people and presented new economic opportunities as people have saved money on electricity.

E-mobility in Cartago, Grecia and Guanacaste in Costa Rica

In Cartago, Grecia and Guanacaste in Costa Rica, electric mobility (e-mobility) is the new frontier for achieving net zero emissions. Electric mobility is presented as a natural choice for the country thanks to its high share of renewable energies in the electricity supply, the availability of space for infrastructure, the short average distance traveled and the optimal average temperature for vehicles. electric (VE).

With effective policies in place, the report points out that Cartago, Grecia and Guanacaste have all experienced a positive increase in electric mobility infrastructure. Easy access to facilities, combined with the cost-efficiency of electric vehicles, encourages residents to switch from fossil fuel vehicles to electric vehicles and adopt a more sustainable mode of travel. Electric buses have also increased in number, not only creating jobs for trainers and drivers, but also reducing the demand for private driving and hence GHG emissions.

Wind power plant in Zhangjiakou, China

In Zhangjiakou, China, locals testified about the positive change brought about by a wind-powered system. After moving away from charcoal for heating, residents found the air cleaner, which motivated people to enjoy nature and socialize more in outdoor environments. Wind power has also fueled the city’s growth as companies increasingly sought to establish their operations in Zhangjiakou, to benefit from the low-cost electricity produced by wind power.

Geothermal energy for district heating and cooking in Xiong’an, China

Xiong’an became the first smog-free city in northern China thanks to the development of geothermal energy. Thanks to its low operating and maintenance costs, as well as its resistance to weather conditions, geothermal energy has successfully replaced coal-fired district heating in Xiong’an. Residents enjoy the benefits of reduced heating costs, and the geothermal power plant as well as the district thermal network creates jobs for the city.

Geothermal energy for district heating in Bogatić, Serbia

In Serbia, the success of the municipality of Bogatić in deploying geothermal energy for the district heating system has motivated other municipalities to exploit their geothermal potential. After discovering profitability and the resulting reduction in pollution, residents and financial institutions are now the advocates of the technology. See guidelines for policymakers at Integrate low-temperature renewable energies into urban energy systems.

Global energy transformation starts at the local level

The examples presented in the report present best practices for other cities working towards low-carbon energy supply. What they emphasize is the importance of strong alignment between local and national governments, and proactive engagement from local residents, community groups and businesses. For the global race to zero to unfold at an accelerated pace, the world’s urban environments must be empowered to take meaningful action.

Read more in the Renewable energy policies for cities and related case studies, also available in Spanish and Chinese. The reports and case studies were produced with the support of the International Climate Initiative.

IRENA



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