Ecology Jobs – E JEMED http://e-jemed.org/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 11:14:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://e-jemed.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1-150x150.png Ecology Jobs – E JEMED http://e-jemed.org/ 32 32 JKPSC KAS 2021 Exam: 10 Important Tips for Passing the Exam https://e-jemed.org/jkpsc-kas-2021-exam-10-important-tips-for-passing-the-exam/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 06:48:38 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/jkpsc-kas-2021-exam-10-important-tips-for-passing-the-exam/ JKPSC KAS 2021 Exam: The Jammu and Kashmir Civil Service Commission (JKPSC) will conduct the Kashmir Administrative Services (KAS) 2021 Main Review on February 14. Candidates who have passed the preliminary exam are now eligible to take the main exam. With the exam date close at hand, it is essential to boost exam preparation. So […]]]>

JKPSC KAS 2021 Exam: The Jammu and Kashmir Civil Service Commission (JKPSC) will conduct the Kashmir Administrative Services (KAS) 2021 Main Review on February 14. Candidates who have passed the preliminary exam are now eligible to take the main exam.

With the exam date close at hand, it is essential to boost exam preparation. So here are ten tips and tricks that should help aspirants in their preparation.

– Answer writing is a very important part of the main exam, as candidates are required to write essays for eight articles. Toppers suggested not to follow the NCERT response writing format because it sticks to the upper secondary level. Rather, candidates should practice writing crisp, clear, and crystal-clear responses.

– For articles that require a bit of technicality and factual knowledge, such as geography, the candidate should try to provide as much data as possible to support their answers. In the case of geography, they can include a map, organization chart, etc. on every page. It is advisable to practice explaining a particular concept using a flowchart as well.

– In addition, the ideal style of essay writing should be maintained, ie including introduction, body and essay. However, try to put as many diagrams, graphs, flowcharts, etc. as possible. in the body itself.

– In addition, the conclusion of the tests must be related to the question asked. For example, if the question is about ecology, then the conclusion must be relevant. It is always advisable to end a response in an optimistic tone and to refrain from over-criticizing.

– As mentioned above, the toppers advised not to include a direct review on a particular answer. Rather, it should be constructive in nature. In short, we should try to add a solution following the criticism. Above all, the solution must be pragmatic, optimistic and never vindictive.

– In the sixth tip, applicants should note that according to the JKPSC KAS 2021 program, the total time to pass the Hands exam is 03 hours. Therefore, from now on, one should practice doing it within the allotted time. This will help prepare the mind for the actual exam.

For the story, you have to have a solid conceptual framework. This improves the quality of responses and ensures rich content.

– According to toppers, answers that contain real applications and case studies are likely to get more points. Candidates should also practice writing easily understandable answers.

– While studying for papers like IR, it is essential to have a solid understanding of the basics of world history. In addition, it is suggested to practice writing responses that are relevant from India’s point of view.

– Finally, discussing becomes very important at this stage. It is advisable to talk to the elderly, parents, elders, etc. because sometimes they can provide important information on a particular topic or concept.

After the main exam, a merit list would be published by the JKPSC. Qualified applicants will need to go through the third step of the selection process, i.e. the interview. Following the series of interviews, the commission will publish the JKPSC KAS results soon. The date of this will be announced later by the governing body on the official website.


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Introduction to Lakes Online Course Offered | News, Sports, Jobs https://e-jemed.org/introduction-to-lakes-online-course-offered-news-sports-jobs/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 08:24:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/introduction-to-lakes-online-course-offered-news-sports-jobs/ LANSING – Lakes hold a special place in our hearts – no matter if you are a born and raised Michigander, or a visitor to the Great Lakes State – and can offer an escape from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. Visiting natural areas can improve mood, reduce stress, and strengthen the immune […]]]>

LANSING – Lakes hold a special place in our hearts – no matter if you are a born and raised Michigander, or a visitor to the Great Lakes State – and can offer an escape from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. Visiting natural areas can improve mood, reduce stress, and strengthen the immune system.

Whether you live by a lake, visit a secret fishing spot, or escape the daily grind on a camping trip to a serene lake in the woods, lakes provide irreplaceable benefits for our mental and physical health and deserve our appreciation and attention.

This month, Michigan State University Extension is offering the opportunity to develop a more in-depth understanding of inland lakes by enrolling in the Introduction to Lakes Online course, an award-winning and nationally recognized six-week course in an online format. practical line and at its own pace. The course is designed for anyone with a passion or curiosity for inland lakes, including lakeside property owners, local government officials, lake managers, and educators. Course instructors include MSU Extension educators and state agency staff.

Registration and course information

The 2022 course runs from January 25 to March 16 and costs $ 115 per person. Register before January 10 to benefit from a reduction of $ 95 per person. Registrations are open until January 21. Scholarships are available. Registration information is available on the Introduction to Lakes course web page.

Since the course was first offered online in 2015, more than 1,000 people across the country have participated. Participants continually praise the level of content and interaction they have with instructors and other students in the class. A student said, “Hearing from other students broadened my perspective and definition of a local resident. I now realize that each lake is unique, as are its caregivers, their priorities and their concerns. “

Students have week-by-week, 24/7 access to six online units, with pre-recorded video lectures, activities, resources and quizzes. Students communicate with each other and with instructors through lively discussion forums and bimonthly webinars. Ask-an-Expert webinars provide opportunities to learn from experts at the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Michigan State University, and the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy. Course topics include lake ecology, watersheds, shorelines, Michigan water law, aquatic plant management, and community involvement. A certificate of completion is awarded to those who complete the course, and students receive a free one-year membership in the Michigan Lakes and Streams Association.

Students can also receive continuing education credits, including 16 pesticide applicator recertification credits from the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development and credits in the MSU Extension Master Citizen Planner, Master Gardener, Master programs. Naturalist and Conservation Stewards.

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Tumwater mayor retires after 30 years of working in town https://e-jemed.org/tumwater-mayor-retires-after-30-years-of-working-in-town/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 15:31:19 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/tumwater-mayor-retires-after-30-years-of-working-in-town/ On a rainy evening on December 15, dozens of people gathered at South Puget Sound Community College to celebrate and honor Pete Kmet’s 30-year tenure in Tumwater. While each story is different, they all shared similar feelings about the outgoing mayor: Kmet has become an institution, an encyclopedia, and a mentor for the city. Born […]]]>

On a rainy evening on December 15, dozens of people gathered at South Puget Sound Community College to celebrate and honor Pete Kmet’s 30-year tenure in Tumwater.

While each story is different, they all shared similar feelings about the outgoing mayor: Kmet has become an institution, an encyclopedia, and a mentor for the city.

Born in Hinsdale, New Hampshire, in 1953, Kmet received his bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from the University of Norwich in Vermont. He then obtained a master’s degree in environmental engineering from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. While working with the Wisconsin DNR, Kmet said he went on vacation to Washington and fell in love.

He started applying for jobs and met one in Washington’s new ecology department. He and his wife moved to Tumwater in 1984, started a family, and haven’t moved since.

Kmet was elected 42nd Mayor of the Town of Tumwater in 2009. Prior to that he served on City Council for 18 years and as Pro Tem Mayor for 14 of those years.

Thurston County Commissioner Tye Menser said Kmet’s longevity is something you don’t see often.

“Revenue is the buzzword, longevity is scarce,” he said.

Menser shared a memory he has of Kmet on a sunny morning in October 2019.

The two were working with students at McLane Elementary School on a habitat mitigation project where they planted new oak trees. Menser said he remembered seeing Kmet working with a small group of children to plant their oaks, guiding them to make sure the trees were deep enough, to have the right amount of mulch and soil, and encouraging them as they successfully planted their first tree.

“Putting your hands in the mud, teaching the next generation, and engaging in direct actions that have a long-term impact on the community sums up Pete’s character,” he said. “A true champion of the environment.

Tumwater City Council member Eileen Swarthout said she didn’t know anyone who enjoys campaigning more than Kmet. She said he was always meeting people back home and rallying communities to encourage citizens to vote.

She said her motto “promises made, promises kept” shows her desire to make Tumwater the best place to live. She said she didn’t think there was a better mayor, jokingly apologizing to other Thurston County mayors in the audience.

Swarthout said she shared Menser’s feeling that Kmet got his hands dirty. She said he can often be seen pulling weeds or picking up trash on Tumwater Hill.

“He’s an engineer, he knows everything,” she said. “We will miss you, Mr. Encyclopedia. “

Lieutenant Governor Denny Heck said Kmet won just about every community service award, and rightly so. He said he wanted there to be a public service leadership award named after Kmet and that he left town better than he found it.

“Just about everything that’s happened in Tumwater and sometimes beyond, over the past 30 years, bears Pete’s signature,” he said.

Kmet said that never in his wildest dreams had he expected to run for office, let alone become mayor one day. It happened in his neighborhood activism instead. He said Ralph Osgood, the former mayor of Tumwater, was his neighbor and convinced him to get more involved by running for city council. Osgood later encouraged him to run for mayor.

He said he was happy to have been able to help the Town of Tumwater accomplish so much during his tenure. Many projects have been carried out by Kmet, including the restoration of the Old Brewhouse tower and the launch of the Tumwater FRESH program.

Kmet said the iconic Brewhouse Tower must be saved because of its history and its links to other architectures in the city, including the town hall and the fire station. He saw it as part of the fabric of the community, and he has since learned of its important role in the history of Tumwater and Washington State, as a representation of the early industrial era.

“History has always been one of my interests and this structure represents an important part of the history of this community,” he said.

Kmet once said he was walking through Isabella Bush Park, where there is a small farm and barn. He knew the space was not being used and came up with the idea to revitalize it as an educational opportunity for local schools. From this idea was born the program FRESH, which stands for Farm Rooted Education for Sustainability and Health.

The program, in partnership with the Tumwater School District and GRuB in Olympia, aims to ’empower young people to take control of their lives and be good citizens while creating opportunities for personal growth and building sustainable systems of food production “. according to TSD.

The food that students help grow and cultivate is donated to school cafeterias, students and families in need, food banks, and senior centers.

Kmet said parents contacted him and said the FRESH program had changed their child’s life and put him on the right track.

During the retirement celebration, Kmet said his job was never about himself but the citizens of Tumwater and the support he received from his wife and son.

“There are times when you come home at night and it’s hard to sleep,” he said. “You worry if you said the right thing, if you said something stupid. But I’m proud of what we’ve been able to accomplish in Tumwater.

Kmet said he thinks 30 years is ringing right for his retirement. He hopes to continue to volunteer in his community, but feels he has done his fair share of contributing to the community in his role as mayor.

He’s confident that mayor-elect Debbie Sullivan will be able to take care of the city, and the current city council is strong enough to push big plans forward.

From there, he said he had a long list of projects to do at home. He eventually hopes to volunteer with housing groups in Tumwater.

Kmet said he was back at his college in Vermont for a class reunion. Several peers approached him telling him that even the smallest thing he did for them changed their lives for the better. He said he was proud to have been able to touch so many lives, hopefully for the best.

A statement of encouragement now sits on her desk: “We are all destined to change people’s lives in ways that we cannot even imagine today.” Go ahead and do great things.

This story was originally published January 3, 2022 5:00 a.m.


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Austinites take part in Polar Bear Plunge in Barton Springs https://e-jemed.org/austinites-take-part-in-polar-bear-plunge-in-barton-springs/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 22:01:51 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/austinites-take-part-in-polar-bear-plunge-in-barton-springs/ AUSTIN, Texas – Some people kicked off the New Years while drinking champagne with friends at midnight, while others jumped into Barton Springs at 5 a.m. on Saturday morning. “It allows people to connect directly to sources, so they discover how wonderful it is with that personal connection that they want to help protect,” said […]]]>

Some people kicked off the New Years while drinking champagne with friends at midnight, while others jumped into Barton Springs at 5 a.m. on Saturday morning.

“It allows people to connect directly to sources, so they discover how wonderful it is with that personal connection that they want to help protect,” said Bill Bunch, executive director of Save Our Springs Alliance. .

The SOS Alliance, which describes itself as Austin’s “water watchdog”, turns 30 this year. Following the cancellation of the Polar Bear Plunge event in 2020, loyal fans of the sources and conservationists have returned to celebrate another year with a refreshing dip.

Some people kicked off the New Years while drinking champagne with friends at midnight, while others jumped into Barton Springs at 5 a.m. on Saturday morning.

“The cross section of the city appears,” Austinite Scott Burton said. “There are people who are streaming. “

It’s more than a fun activity for thrill seekers to do – it’s a way to preserve Austin’s ecology and history.

“I think the miracle of Barton Springs is the change that we haven’t seen,” Burton said. “40 years ago there was a huge threat to the aquifer and Austin had the courage to pass a publicly voted resolution to protect the waterways that are filling up and that we have this crystal clear water in right downtown in the middle of a million people you can swim in, that’s why it’s called the soul of Austin. ”

Water is threatened by pollution. There are two endangered species of salamanders that live in Barton Springs.

“There is no economy on a dead planet, there is no happy life or game, if the places we have don’t thrive, so taking care of our place is the obvious place to start. “said Brandi Clark Burton.

The group also sold their shirts with the Polar Bear Plunge logo to raise funds. The event takes place all afternoon.

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MORE TITLES:
City of Austin and TreeFolks Host Tree Planting Event on January 8
Texas to receive $ 221 million to replace lead pipes under Biden plan
City of Austin aims to create more green jobs for residents
41 Austin-area schools to receive Bright Green Future grants
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After the New Year, you may need to prepare for your next Walla Takeout Stop Walla | Business https://e-jemed.org/after-the-new-year-you-may-need-to-prepare-for-your-next-walla-takeout-stop-walla-business/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 01:00:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/after-the-new-year-you-may-need-to-prepare-for-your-next-walla-takeout-stop-walla-business/ Closures and physical distancing have given take-out food to restaurants a boost during the pandemic as “ordering” has become the “search” for many. But starting on Saturday, if you want utensils and other disposables with your next take out order, you’ll have to ask. A new state law prevent Washington businesses from automatically including single-use […]]]>

Closures and physical distancing have given take-out food to restaurants a boost during the pandemic as “ordering” has become the “search” for many. But starting on Saturday, if you want utensils and other disposables with your next take out order, you’ll have to ask.

A new state law prevent Washington businesses from automatically including single-use catering items such as plastic straws, utensils and condiments with food orders.

These convenience items will always be available on request, but the customer will need to ask, confirm their choice when asked, or select the items at a self-service station.

Customers are also encouraged to bring their own reusable dishes.

The rule, signed by Gov. Jay Inslee in May, aims to reduce single-use plastic waste and increase recycling.

For businesses in the Walla Walla area, the change is expected to be minor, especially compared to the October plastic bag ban, said Kathryn Witherington, executive director of the Downtown Walla Walla Foundation.

“The bag ban has had a much bigger impact on business practices and bottom lines … for all the loops our businesses have been throwing in the past year and a half, this one is hardly a ripple.” , Witherington said.

Instead, she focuses on educating buyers. “We want to make sure businesses are prepared for any uncertainties that may arise. “

Witherington handed out a resource guide to local businesses compiled by the Washington State Department of Ecology to help educate buyers.

Items that fall under the new rule include:

  • Forks, spoons, knives, chopsticks and other utensils
  • Cocktail sticks, straws, coffee sticks and stirrers
  • Condiment sachets or sauce cups
  • Cold cup lids, except those given to ATMs or large events

Single-use catering items covered by the new requirements

Livit Coffee owner Andrew Thonney echoed Witherington’s sentiments. The popular cafe sees around 200 customers a day and will have to make adjustments soon as the lids of the cold mugs see restrictions.

“It will be a transition for us, but with so many alternative options to plastic these days, we don’t expect this to be a real problem – other than maybe a small increase in costs,” Thonney said.

“A lot of that will be customer notification, but frankly Walla Walla is a super understanding community. They recognize where our hands are tied, ”he said.






Barista Alex Cerone helps a customer at Livit Coffee in July 2019.




Jason Potter, team leader in Graze in downtown Walla Walla, agreed.

“I don’t expect this to have much of an impact on our operations,” Potter said.

But some companies say they are concerned about how they will navigate the change.

Popular take-out for lunch, Stone Soup Café, and Supper Supper owner Aaron Leen said he did not yet have a plan on how the restaurant would handle the new rule.

“Considering that we are dealing with hundreds of clients every day, I think this will be terrible,” said Leen. “Like the ban on plastic bags, it is a waste of time in my opinion.”

Repeated non-compliance by companies can result in fines, according to the Department of Ecology. The fines cannot be less than $ 150 for each day of violation, with a ceiling of $ 2,000 per day, according to the text of the bill.

The law is part of a larger piece of legislation aimed at reducing plastic waste in packaging and products used daily, said Shannon Jones, materials management coordinator at Ecology.

“It’s not a ban. This doesn’t mean that people can’t get single-use utensils with their take out. It’s an attempt to reduce waste from people using items that might have ended up being thrown away or in a drawer, ”Jones said.

U.S. consumers throw away nearly a trillion single-use food items each year, according to a report cited by the Ministry of Ecology in a December press release.






Recycling in Walla Walla

An employee of the Walla Walla Recycling Center sorts a shipment of cardboard in November 2019.



Jones says single-use catering products are a major contaminant in the state’s recycling systems.

“It’s part of a national problem of tackling inconsistent recycling programs with drastically different lists of what’s accepted. There is also a lot of confusion among consumers around recycling, ”Jones said.

The Valley Recycling Enigma

While all municipalities are required to provide a recycling option in Washington State, the decision about what is accepted in the local recycling stream is made at the local level – another reason for the lack of consistency between programs. recycling in the region.

In the town of Walla Walla, the only recyclable items are clean, dry paper, cardboard, aluminum and tin. Plastic and glass are not accepted.

Shane Prudente, Walla Walla’s public works communications coordinator, said he believed many residents were unaware that the city was unable to recycle plastic, despite their best efforts in education and awareness. public.

“I imagine that with the entry into force of this new legislation, we would see less plastic in the recycling stream,” he said.






Plastic bottle recycling lot

The Walla Walla recycling center collects plastic bottles for shipping.



Prudente says the decision not to recycle plastic and glass is due to cost.

In a unanimous decision of October 14, 2020, Walla Walla City Council accepted a committee recommendation to suspend plastic recycling, a rule that came into effect in early 2021.

The move was part of a strategy to correct the misuse of the recycling program, a challenge that drives up costs.

If the contamination of recyclable waste is reduced, the suspension will be reassessed in 2023.

“When residents put items in a recycling bin, those items are trucked to Tacoma, which has a larger processing facility. This facility determines whether the items can be made into pulp or sent to landfill, ”said Prudente, referring to Pioneer Recycling Services in Tacoma.

“So many times plastic or glass waste is shipped long distances only to be landfilled. “

The city of College Place faces an even more precarious recycling situation, having suspended all curbside recycling services.

The rule came into effect on March 27, 2018, after the The Chinese government has dramatically increased the quality requirements on what recyclable materials they would accept. College Place did not meet this new requirement.

What’s the next step: creating local alternatives?

Expanded polystyrene, commonly known as polystyrene, will be the next material in the state to see restrictions in the years to come.

In June 2023, peanut packaging and other fillers will be banned. In June 2024, polystyrene catering products such as containers, plates, bowls, clam shells, platters and cups will also be banned.

Phil Harding, Director of Business Innovation at Colombian pulp LLC in Dayton said the alternative pulp mill hopes its products will help the local economy adjust to the changes.






Columbia Pulp Mill

The Columbia Pulp plant near Starbuck.




Each year, Columbia Pulp converts 250,000 tonnes of recycled wheat straw from the harvest into fiber that paper and packaging manufacturers can use to make things like food containers, napkins and handkerchiefs.

“If companies run out of molded clam shells, for example, they will look for alternatives. So that creates an attraction in the market, ”said Harding. “Maybe that’s where they turn to us. “

“Recycling is thwarted in sparsely populated areas. It’s not profitable or the best thing for the planet to have giant fuel-burning trucks driving around to collect my pot of yogurt, ”he said.

Harding said he hopes to provide a renewable alternative fiber product that also creates jobs and supports the eastern Washington farming community.

“We know the polystyrene will go away. This creates an exciting opportunity for our factory to create a co-product with farmers that builds a more sustainable future for our region.


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Judge says New York Times may keep Project Veritas memos, for now https://e-jemed.org/judge-says-new-york-times-may-keep-project-veritas-memos-for-now/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 23:05:28 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/judge-says-new-york-times-may-keep-project-veritas-memos-for-now/ AG Sulzberger, publisher of The Times, said in a statement last week that Judge Wood’s order “had no apparent precedent,” adding: “This decision should alert not only press freedom advocates , but also anyone concerned about the dangers of government. go too far into what the public can and cannot know. The Appeals Division reviews […]]]>

AG Sulzberger, publisher of The Times, said in a statement last week that Judge Wood’s order “had no apparent precedent,” adding: “This decision should alert not only press freedom advocates , but also anyone concerned about the dangers of government. go too far into what the public can and cannot know.

The Appeals Division reviews decisions of New York City Magistrates’ Court judges, but the state’s highest court, the New York State Court of Appeals, may ultimately hear arguments in the ‘case.

The order stems from a libel lawsuit that Project Veritas filed against the Times in 2020 that accused the newspaper of defamation.

Unrelated to the lawsuit, the Justice Department has begun investigating Project Veritas and its provocative leader, James O’Keefe, for its possible role in the theft of a diary belonging to President Biden’s daughter, Ashley.

In its coverage of the investigation, The Times cited notes prepared by a lawyer for Project Veritas that preceded the defamation lawsuit and outlined strategies to ensure that the group’s reporting tactics remain legal. (Project Veritas often engages in deceptive practices, including using false identities and hidden cameras to embarrass liberals, media, and others.)


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Evolutionary biology pioneer EO Wilson dies at 92 https://e-jemed.org/evolutionary-biology-pioneer-eo-wilson-dies-at-92/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 18:12:21 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/evolutionary-biology-pioneer-eo-wilson-dies-at-92/ “Future generations will forgive us for our horrific genocidal wars, because it will go too far down in history. They will forgive us for all the follies and misdeeds of previous generations. But they will not forgive us for having so carelessly thrown much of the rest of the life into our care. Edward Osborne […]]]>

“Future generations will forgive us for our horrific genocidal wars, because it will go too far down in history. They will forgive us for all the follies and misdeeds of previous generations. But they will not forgive us for having so carelessly thrown much of the rest of the life into our care. Edward Osborne Wilson was one of the great biologists of the 20th century, a classical naturalist drawn to wild places. “Here is a nest of the infamous fire ant.” He was the world’s foremost specialist in ant biology. But his wit and talent went far beyond insects. He was a deep thinker who developed major theories in ecology and evolution. He became an unlikely celebrity, taking center stage in two scientific controversies of the 20th century. During his career he won almost all of the major science prizes and two Pulitzer Prizes. “I would like to say a word about safeguarding biological diversity – the rest of life.” The New York Times met him in his Harvard office in March 2008 for this interview to discuss his life and how his love for science grew out of his love for the natural world. “I believe that a child is by nature a hunter. I started with a butterfly collection when I was 9 years old. And I thought I was an explorer, and I decided to lead an expedition and collect bugs. And I started it, and I never stopped. His first expeditions led to the description of hundreds of new species. His breakthroughs in the study of insect social behavior and communication have changed the way we think about ourselves. “Some people have called you modern-day Darwin. False modesty aside, how does this fit you? “Of course he, being the pioneer and a man of almost unbelievable acuity, I think he is second to none. But among the current living people, I think I am the best approach. The early part of Wilson’s career was marked by conflict and controversy. The 1950s and 1960s were turbulent years for science. The discovery in 1953 of the structure of DNA by Francis Crick and James Watson forever changed biology. Tensions arose between those in the new discipline of molecular biology and classical biologists, whose focus on whole organisms and species seemed old-fashioned. Perhaps no place has been more marked than Harvard. And Edward Wilson and James Watson clashed. “He insisted that all of that old biology needed to go away because now the future of biology lies in molecular biology. And the faster you get started, the better. And he was very rude about it. I took it very personally, because I admired this man. He was only a year older, but here was someone who had made a truly historic breakthrough. I called it the Caligula of biology. And he could do whatever he wanted, and everyone would cheer. Over time, the two eminent scientists mended the barriers, praising each other in public and sometimes appearing on television together. In the 1970s, Wilson became the center of a political storm when he launched a new discipline called sociobiology. He extended his ideas on social behavior from insects to animals and then to humans, placing himself at the center of the debate on nature versus education. “This is the fundamental principle of sociobiology. Genes for particular social behaviors exist and have been propagated by natural selection. But scientists are deeply divided over the scientific and social implications. “” She floated the dovecotes of the social sciences and, in general, of the political extreme left. Everyone had decided that the human brain is a blank slate, and that everything is determined by history and by contingency. And anyone who said there was a biologically grounded human nature shouldn’t be doing anything right. What you were doing was opening the door to racism or gender discrimination. The opposition to sociobiology at Harvard is particularly fierce. It was headed by Richard Lewontin and Steve Gould. They set out to completely discredit the sociobiology of any merit. “” We don’t know anything about why some people are more aggressive than others, some people are more enterprising, indeed why some people have more musical ability than others. There is no evidence that such individuals differ in their genes. For Wilson, the criticism took on a more concrete form at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. “My turn has come to give the conference. And this group, they rushed on stage. They took the microphone. One of the young women came up behind me, grabbed the pitcher of ice water and poured it over my head. I said to myself, this is very interesting. I think I’m going to be the only scientist to have been physically attacked in recent years for an idea. Seeing the controversy, he set out to approach it directly. “Even moderately centrist newspapers – Time magazine, for example – came to accept that this was some kind of extreme belief in the human genetic basis of behavior. So I sat down and wrote the book “On Human Nature”, which was to explain the human aspect as I saw it, including a lot of new evidence. It won a Pulitzer Prize. And it’s kind of still the crowd screaming, as they say in a football game after the opponent has made a touchdown. It was a lot less after that. Edward Osborne Wilson was born in Birmingham, Alabama in 1929. Her family life was difficult. Her father was an alcoholic who ultimately committed suicide. But these difficulties were associated with a natural love of the outdoors. “My dad had jobs that took him to a lot of places, to different places in Alabama, then to Pensacola and so on. I went to something like 15 or 16 schools in 11 years of schooling. I was pretty much alone as an only child, so I had wood to myself, so to speak. And I felt like an explorer every day I went out. Wilson was blinded in one eye in a fishing accident as a child. The resulting lack of depth perception made some observations difficult. But he could hold the bugs up to his good eye. “I brought home black widows. My parents actually allowed me to breed black widow spiders in large jars on the back porch. “Were you religious when you were a boy? “Well, I was Southern Baptist, of course. And of course, I was devout, because everyone was devout, just like everyone in southern Alabama was racist. It was part of the culture that was unchallenged. When I got to college I discovered evolution and combined that with the natural rebellion of a 17 and 18 year old – I moved away from fundamentalist Protestantism. “So do you believe in God?” “” I am not an atheist, for I think it would be foolish to deny, dogmatically, the possibility of some form of higher intelligence. But religion is simply an expression of tribalism which includes the belief, the hope, the desire that this particular tribe be blessed by God. Satisfied with this explanation, I then find it much easier to speak with the tribal leaders, also known as priests, rabbis and pastors. His 2006 book, “The Creation,” was aimed specifically at Christians. “I have become very friends with evangelical leaders as a result of my call for cooperation between scientists and environmentalists to engage in saving the Earth’s biodiversity. “We have to paint the …” At the time of this interview, Wilson, 79, was busy in his lab at Harvard, performing in an episode of “Nova” on PBS and writing books. He looked forward to the publication of his first novel, a political allegory set in an anthill. Perhaps his greatest legacy is his effort to preserve the planet’s declining biodiversity. “What we have to keep in mind when considering the rest of life on Earth is that we are losing it. And that’s the part that can’t be brought back. We are destroying species and ecosystems that are millions of years old and invaluable to humanity and future generations. And we don’t know how quickly they are disappearing. How to wake up things? So I wrote an article called “Encyclopedia of Life”. And it took very quickly. A lot of people have said, yes, that’s the way to do it. Electronic encyclopedia with a website for every species of organism in the world, although it turned out that there were 100 million. The Encyclopedia of Life was launched in February 2008. It was only the latest in Wilson’s many efforts to raise awareness of the species’ extinction. “How would you like to be remembered?” “As Darwin’s successor. [laughs] Like having carried the torch, at least for a short time.


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Slice of Life: New York’s Famous $ 1 Street Pizza Threatened by Rising Costs | New York https://e-jemed.org/slice-of-life-new-yorks-famous-1-street-pizza-threatened-by-rising-costs-new-york/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 15:39:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/slice-of-life-new-yorks-famous-1-street-pizza-threatened-by-rising-costs-new-york/ “Well, you can never go wrong with bread, cheese and tomato,” New York street poet Lou Reed sometimes remarked as he passed one of the city’s multitudes of pizzerias. The late musician was a fan of the legendary Totonno’s from Coney Island, near the site of one of the first recorded pizzerias started by Italian […]]]>

“Well, you can never go wrong with bread, cheese and tomato,” New York street poet Lou Reed sometimes remarked as he passed one of the city’s multitudes of pizzerias.

The late musician was a fan of the legendary Totonno’s from Coney Island, near the site of one of the first recorded pizzerias started by Italian immigrants in the 1880s.

One hundred and forty years later, New York’s obsessive relationship with cheap street pizza – there are around 1,700 pizzerias across the city – is more tangled than ever. But now there are cracks in this union. Rents are rising and supply chain problems leading to inflation are pushing up the price of oil, cheese, wheat and meat. Deliveries are irregular, tomato sauce faces higher shipping costs, and pizza boxes are scarce.

Now, the existence of the legendary $ 99 or dollar pizzerias that depend on fast, high-volume commerce is under threat after nearly two years of foot traffic reduced by the pandemic. It’s a blow not only to the city’s image, but also to many low-income New Yorkers in times of turmoil.

Abdul Muhammad, owner of Fresh Pizza at 99 Cents, a chain of eight branches in Manhattan, said it could increase the price of its wafer for the first time since opening in 2001 if costs continue to rise. “I have to think about it because my clients, many of whom are unemployed and struggling to pay their rent, cannot afford to pay more.

99 Cent Fresh has remained open during the pandemic except for a month in March 2020, in part, Muhammed said, because he knows that for some of his customers, a slice is all the food they can get.

“I feel bad because everyone has had a lot of problems with the coronavirus, no work, everything was closed and the grocery stores that were open doubled their prices. So I try to stay open to help people, ”added Muhammad.

Outside the 99 Cent Fresh store on 6th Avenue and 8th Street, several customers said they counted on the point of sale. “I come here when I’m hungry, but I can’t come here all the time because I have diabetes,” said Sam Pegano, who said he was homeless. “It’s important to me, especially in winter, because it’s hot food.

Others said the dollar slice was important to their lives because it was quick and cheap.

“New Yorkers love dollar slice pizzas because they’re all over town and open late,” said Bishank Gaglani, NYU data science graduate. “Anytime you need a bite to eat and you don’t know what to eat, you can grab a slice and you’re good to go. “

A shuttered pizzeria near the Empire State Building in Manhattan. Photograph: Ed Jones / AFP / Getty Images

Gaglani said he noticed the prices had gone up. “I can’t imagine New York without the slice of the dollar. But even if it goes down to $ 1.50, people will still come. “

In New York’s complex pizza ecology, the $ 99 or dollar slice has a controversial reputation. Pizzerias like the famous John’s on Bleecker Street will not touch the slice trade, opting only for whole pies. Others spruce up their slices and jack prices up to $ 4 or more.

The search for the perfect pizza, a pipe dream, occupies some minds, including that of Scott Weiner, owner of Visits Pizza Scott, which transports enthusiasts across town by bus in this research.

According to Weiner, the dollar slice business model emerged as a business that operated alongside homeless shelters. “It almost looked like a public service,” he said. After the 2008 recession, the business expanded to areas with heavy foot traffic and transportation hubs.

“It has become late night food for drunk people with the same economy as a $ 3 slice store but with more volume,” he said. “At the same time, it lowered the perception of the quality of pizza in New York City and became a beacon in a city so dear to live. It was like, look how cool this town is – you can get a slice of pizza for a dollar.

While New Yorkers are forced to choose their battles – with high rents being common – the cheap pizza slice is a way, in a sense, to win one back. “Citizens are empowered by the variety of pizzas in New York City because you can choose between getting a 12 inch single serve Neapolitan pizza, high quality, great ingredients, for $ 18 or the dollar per slice instead. end of the spectrum, ”Weiner said.

Both, Weiner said, can quench thirst – “it just depends on the nature of the thirst.”

At the same time, Weiner is concerned that the owners of dollar-slice chains have committed to fixing their prices on their behalf and cannot withstand the price fluctuations. When leases are renewed with higher rents, that alone can destroy New York’s renowned restaurant business model – which has been hit hard by the pandemic. By some estimates, more than 1,000 New York restaurants have closed during Covid-19.

But – despite the current difficulties – the New York pizza love story is set to continue. After all, he has such a long past.

Pizza historian Peter Regas traces the first published accounts of a pizzeria in Naples around 1845, when it was described as the “gastronomic thermometer of the market”. By the turn of the century, Italian immigrants had bought the tradition in New York City and established pizza ovens, often in taverns, harbor or seaside neighborhoods like Red Hook and Coney Island.

“It’s pretty definitive that New York is the hotbed of pizza in America,” Regas said.

The industry grew after the ban was lifted in the 1930s, the Great Depression and further after World War II, expanding to Chicago. Regional differences began to develop. Chicago, home of the deep crust pizza, has little tradition of slice culture.

The custom of the single slice, which began in the late 1940s, is an integral part of New York City, despite the reluctance of owners of more traditional pizzerias, Regas said. The loss of it, he believes, would be a loss for all.

Regas recalled a legendary pizzeria Di Fara on J Avenue in Brooklyn.

The elderly owner, Dom, who had been operating there since 1964, has become known as the guy for a slice. “I went there in 2006 and there were about 50 people in his store just looking at it,” he said.

“There is magic in pizza. There’s an individual personality to a pizza that you don’t necessarily get with a burger or hot dog, and that plays into the mystery and drama of the whole.


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Linking research goals to corporate dollars, a recipe for mediocrity https://e-jemed.org/linking-research-goals-to-corporate-dollars-a-recipe-for-mediocrity/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 00:05:14 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/linking-research-goals-to-corporate-dollars-a-recipe-for-mediocrity/ Could Australia be the world leader in research and innovation? The Morrison government has a golden opportunity to do just that. The Australian Research Council – whose competitive funding programs support academic research in the physical, biological and social sciences – is increasingly criticized by both government and researchers (albeit for very different reasons). The […]]]>

Could Australia be the world leader in research and innovation? The Morrison government has a golden opportunity to do just that. The Australian Research Council – whose competitive funding programs support academic research in the physical, biological and social sciences – is increasingly criticized by both government and researchers (albeit for very different reasons). The incapacitated CRA is in desperate need of reform.

Stuart Robert is the Federal Minister for Employment, Manpower, Skills, Small Business and Families.Credit:Dominique lorrimer

Just about any reform of the ARC would be a relief for a community of exasperated academics who are now accustomed to writing 100-page funding applications with little chance of success and with longer wait times. than the period of human gestation.

But hopeful observers were dismayed by the contents of Acting Minister Stuart Robert’s recent “letter of expectations” which was handed – without consultation with those affected – to ARC CEO Professor Sue. Thomas. The letter followed Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s recent announcement of the “Pioneer Universities” program offering large grants to reward “commercialization readiness, manufacturing support and industry alignment”.

The reforms outlined in Minister Robert’s letter will prioritize short-term research jobs that serve the interests of commercial manufacturers. They will reward “translational research”, which will be defined by measures including patents, intellectual property claims and trade agreements.

They will place businessmen on funding selection panels (a decision that raises concerns not only over qualifications but also over incentives). The plan takes a knowledge research infrastructure and turns it into a business support program. To say that the CRA directive for change is a missed opportunity would be an understatement.

Innovation and research are tied to commercialization by the Morrison government.

Innovation and research are tied to commercialization by the Morrison government.Credit:Getty

Australian companies will celebrate this early Christmas giveaway by being offered a seat at the table to direct public research funding to private interests. But the idea that the short-term commercialization of science will create world-class research excellence is deeply flawed. It shows no understanding of the ecology of research, the processes of which are long-term, distributed, exploratory and fundamental.

No technology application can be truly understood, let alone harnessed for good, without understanding what makes a technology possible and what gives it meaning. Consider the advice of Cold War science advisers Jerome Wiesner and Herbert York, who explained why there can be “no technical solution” to the problem of national security in the presence of nuclear weapons. Their argument was that no technology that changes the world could ever be controlled by simply finding another scientific innovation (assuming one can be found). Instead, the solution would require a deep understanding of psychology, history, politics, diplomacy, society, and culture. Today, as we read proposals to offset global warming by obscuring the sun with geoengineered gigaprojects, it’s clear that the lesson has not yet been learned.

A technology may be inefficient, even dangerous, or may simply not realize its potential, if its designer does not understand the goals and needs of the people who use it; the historical contexts which motivated its development; the fundamental mathematics, chemistry and physics that make it work; or the cosmic origins of its elementary constitution. We owe these various forms of knowledge to the truth seekers of the past, and in turn we must pay our descendants with our own unfettered truth seekers. Innovation arises in a vast ecology of knowledge, some of which is sought after, others inherited from other fields, and others simply discovered by accident. Innovation cannot be chased away with a gun. It must be cultivated with the wisdom of long-term, open, and interconnected thinking.


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City Council Approves Two Trees River Ring Proposal https://e-jemed.org/city-council-approves-two-trees-river-ring-proposal/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 16:22:33 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/city-council-approves-two-trees-river-ring-proposal/ The Williamsburg waterfront is set to get a whole lot different. Last week, the New York City Council approved the revised version River ring proposal for the Williamsburg waterfront, ushering in a revolutionary mixed-use development that will provide 263 residences for low- and middle-income New Yorkers, out of 1,050 new units. The project was unanimously […]]]>

The Williamsburg waterfront is set to get a whole lot different.

Last week, the New York City Council approved the revised version River ring proposal for the Williamsburg waterfront, ushering in a revolutionary mixed-use development that will provide 263 residences for low- and middle-income New Yorkers, out of 1,050 new units. The project was unanimously approved by 48 members of the Council. Two Trees Management plans to begin construction in 2024.

Highlights of the River Ring Waterfront Master Plan include:

  • New affordable housing, including 263 permanently affordable apartments (out of a total of 1050 units on site), which feature the same design and amenities as market-priced units, available at an average of 60% AMI with some units as low as 40% FRIEND.
  • Over 150 new affordable housing units for seniors, to be built in Community Council 1 on land funded by Two Trees.
  • A 3 hectare public park which will be funded and maintained by Two Trees Management, as well as an additional 3 acres designated for previously unavailable in-water recreational activities including kayaking, marine ecology, education, intertidal wetlands and an accessible beach.
  • $ 100 million investment in resilience infrastructure and an open space as well that protects hundreds of properties upstream and upstream of the River Ring.
  • A state-of-the-art 50,000 square foot YMCA facility offering a full-service community swimming program that includes free swimming lessons for second year CB1 students.
  • 2,000 construction jobs and more than 500 permanent jobs with a subsidized training program and local hiring, in collaboration with local workforce development partners.
  • $ 1.75 million in funding for community initiatives, including a new environmental benefits fund to help renovate neighborhood buildings and a large community neighborhood open space planning study to connect new and existing parks.
  • Green technology and sustainable design, including a commitment to all-electric buildings and the development of on-site wastewater treatment.
  • Ongoing constructive dialogue with community partners to provide new access to the seafront and support environmental justice and education.

The River Ring Waterfront Master Plan, designed by Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) and James Corner Field Operations (Field Operations), will improve public waterfront connectivity, restore natural habitats, raise the standard of urban waterfront resilience and transform the way New Yorkers interact with the East River.

“The River Ring project is different from almost all waterfront development proposals, and Two Trees is a pioneer in how we can build innovative public spaces in a way that directly addresses the impacts of climate change,” said Cortney Koenig Worrall, CEO and Chairman of Waterfront Alliance. “The project promises to transform New Yorkers’ relationship to water while protecting communities from rising waters by using technologies that honor the local habitat, raising the bar for how we, as city, can build safety and responsibly along our waterfronts. “


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