Ecology Jobs – E JEMED http://e-jemed.org/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 20:18:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://e-jemed.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1-150x150.png Ecology Jobs – E JEMED http://e-jemed.org/ 32 32 Ann Arbor Neighborhood Council’s 5th race pits restaurateur against marketing executive https://e-jemed.org/ann-arbor-neighborhood-councils-5th-race-pits-restaurateur-against-marketing-executive/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 20:18:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/ann-arbor-neighborhood-councils-5th-race-pits-restaurateur-against-marketing-executive/ ANN ARBOR, MI — Voters on Ann Arbor’s West Side will decide between two Democrats vying for a 5th Ward seat on the City Council in the Aug. 2 primary. Incumbent Ali Ramlawi, owner of the downtown Jerusalem Garden restaurant, is seeking a second four-year term. He faces a challenger Jenn Cornellwho was until recently […]]]>

ANN ARBOR, MI — Voters on Ann Arbor’s West Side will decide between two Democrats vying for a 5th Ward seat on the City Council in the Aug. 2 primary.

Incumbent Ali Ramlawi, owner of the downtown Jerusalem Garden restaurant, is seeking a second four-year term. He faces a challenger Jenn Cornellwho was until recently a marketing manager with the Ann Arbor SPARK economic development group and now works for Multiverse Investments and oversees marketing for two local restaurants, Blue LLama and Of Rice and Men.

The two shared the virtual stage during a candidates’ forum hosted by the Ann Arbor Democratic Party on June 16, discussing issues ranging from housing to factional divisions within the council.

Ramlawi said he was proud to be Ann Arbor’s first Arab-American council member and proud of his accomplishments, including the reopening of the city’s recycling plant, progress on affordable housing, tackling dioxane polluter Gelman Sciences and implementing a new tax to close sidewalk gaps. As a small business owner, Ramlawi was also happy to help the city respond during the pandemic and facilitate street closures and ways to safely engage in the community, he said. declared.

“It has been an honor and a privilege to serve a community that I love, do business in and live in, he said.

Ann Arbor City Council Member Ali Ramlawi, D-5th Ward, speaks during a virtual Ann Arbor Democratic Party Candidates Forum on June 16, 2022.Zoom

Cornell has been involved in the community for two decades but could only afford to live here for six years, she said.

“So one of my main platforms is to increase housing in Ann Arbor,” she said. “I think we have a housing crisis. For me, it’s a matter of social and environmental justice.

Cornell also has experience working on environmental issues and has been involved with the local ecology center and the Main Street Association, she said.

“As a former business owner, I know exactly the importance that businesses bring to the city in terms of jobs, economic growth and economic opportunity, and I would like to push that forward on City Council,” she said. “I am also a parent of two young children. I have four children in total, two of them young, and I think that’s an extremely important voice to have on city council.

Cornell mentioned sidewalks and protected bike lanes — ways for families to get around town safely — among the issues she would bring perspective on as a mother.

“I can’t wait to roll up my sleeves, hurry up and work hard,” she said.

Jenn Cornell

Ann Arbor 5th Ward City Council candidate Jenn Corner speaks during a virtual Ann Arbor Democratic Party candidates forum on June 16, 2022.Zoom

Both candidates weighed in on what they see as the main issue facing the 5th Ward. Ramlawi cited infrastructure constraints due to climate change, age and increased development.

“These are the issues we hear the most from residents right now, whether it’s flooding, power outages or burst water pipes, in addition to the dire conditions in many of our roads,” he said.

Economic and environmental justice are among his core beliefs, Ramlawi said, adding that he connects with working-class and creative-class people struggling to live in Ann Arbor.

“It’s great that we’re trying to become as welcoming and open to as many people as possible, but sometimes we make it harder for people who have been here a long time to continue being here,” he said. .

Cornell said his main campaign focus was housing. People who work in Ann Arbor should be able to live here, she said, adding that older residents who want to age in place should also have affordable options to downsize.

“We need a variety of housing and I am incredibly encouraged by the progress of transit-oriented development by the city council,” she said, referring to the new high-density zoning for transit corridors, allowing for downtown-style development in areas such as around Briarwood Mall. . Ramlawi opposed the new regulations, citing concerns that they are not doing enough for affordability or sustainability.

214 acres on Ann Arbor’s west side could be rezoned for high-density housing

Noting that she is a pedestrian commuter to her job downtown, Cornell said she wants to give more people the option of housing that allows for alternative travel, attracting more diversity and making Ann Arbor more inclusive. .

“Going door to door, I hear this – that my neighbors want this and yearn for this for the city,” she said. “So, it is absolutely necessary to advance housing in the city. I want teachers, nurses, people who work here to be able to afford to live here. And I think when we encourage development, we also benefit from developers improving our infrastructure, which helps the city budget. And obviously having more citizens here improves the city’s tax base and budget to do more things.

Both have weighed on factional divisions within the council. Ramlawi is a member of the minority faction that has at times been at odds with Mayor Christopher Taylor and his allies, including on issues related to growth and development, while Cornell is backed by Taylor and his allies.

Ann Arbor is one of Michigan’s great cities, so why is its government such a mess?

Cornell said the rhetoric about factions is divisive and council votes are more nuanced. With a background in communications, she can bring strengths to the board table, she said.

“I know how to build coalitions, I know how to work in teams, I know how to inspire people to work hard, and I know how to compromise when needed,” she said.

Describing himself as a fiercely independent thinker, Ramlawi also said the narrative of factions on the council was overblown.

“Many of us at the council table today vote unanimously on major issues,” he said. “I believe there should be room for a healthy debate about differences.”

On the topic of growth and development, Ramlawi said a comprehensive update of the city’s land use plan has been overdue for years. In the meantime, the council has made decisions about the zoning of transit corridors and more secondary suites in the neighborhoods – which Ramlawi opposed – without a good public process or in the public interest, he said. declared.

Ann Arbor opens the door to more secondary suites in neighborhoods

“We’re only hearing from some stakeholders,” he said, saying a more comprehensive plan update can help achieve affordability and sustainability goals.

“We need to have a master plan in order to have the kind of equity we deserve,” he said. “Ann Arbor has lost a large portion of its black population over the past 20 years. We have lost a large part of the working class, we have lost a large part of the creative class and we have lost sight of the protection of our natural environment. So we have to take a step back and do it right.

Cornell said she’s excited the city is moving forward with a comprehensive plan update.

“It’s a really great way for residents across the city … to weigh in on their priorities,” she said, agreeing that there are opportunities through zoning to advance city goals and she think the city will hear from parents who want a future their children can afford in Ann Arbor.

Saying she wants a welcoming, inclusive and environmentally responsible city, including considering how green spaces are preserved, Cornell said she would also like to hear from the many people who commute to work at Ann Arbor and who are displaced by housing prices and want to live here.

Both candidates also expressed support for advancing the city’s A2Zero carbon neutrality goals.

“I don’t think we’ve done enough to achieve carbon neutrality by 2030,” Ramlawi said.

Carrie Rheingans, who previously launched a campaign to run against Ramlawi, is now running instead for a new State House seat.

LEARN MORE ABOUT NEWS FROM ANN ARBOR:

Ann Arbor mayoral candidates diverge on city growth and development

Ann Arbor 1st Ward council candidates talk housing and key issues

Ann Arbor area development would replace 3 existing homes with 64 townhouses

After train crash, Ann Arbor assesses need for pedestrian underpass

Developer buys Eastern Michigan University building in $12.6 million deal to create STEM center

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Preston’s massive £65million industrial estate, which took years to build, will create 1,500 jobs https://e-jemed.org/prestons-massive-65million-industrial-estate-which-took-years-to-build-will-create-1500-jobs/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 04:15:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/prestons-massive-65million-industrial-estate-which-took-years-to-build-will-create-1500-jobs/ Developers behind a major £65m development in Preston say it could create 1,500 jobs if approved. HBD and the Barnfield Group have filed plans to build a 25 ha employment scheme at Roman Way, including 800,000 square feet of new industrial and warehouse space. The site is close to the existing Roman Way industrial estate […]]]>

Developers behind a major £65m development in Preston say it could create 1,500 jobs if approved.

HBD and the Barnfield Group have filed plans to build a 25 ha employment scheme at Roman Way, including 800,000 square feet of new industrial and warehouse space. The site is close to the existing Roman Way industrial estate and the developers claim it is ideally placed due to its transport links. The site is an allocated employment site under Preston City Council’s local plan and the developers have been in pre-bid discussions with the local authority since 2020.

The companies say work could start on the site as early as this year if planning permission is granted. Chris Newsome, Senior Development Surveyor at HBD, said: “The site is very well connected, close to the motorway network and just 2km from the M6, making it an ideal location for an industrial project of this caliber. It is also adjacent to the thriving Roman Way industrial estate and would help address the shortage of high-quality industrial space in the area, while creating thousands of new jobs.

READ MORE: Detailed plans released for new restaurants and stores at abandoned IKEA project site

Tracy Clavell-Bate, Development Manager for Barnfield Group, said: “It’s great to bring the site to the planning stage; it has not been without its challenges, but we are sure it is a natural extension of the existing Roman Way site, which is fully occupied, that the development will be extremely successful if planning is granted.

Since discussions began, a range of technical experts and specialist consultants have been involved in carrying out comprehensive site assessments, alongside architects Fletcher Rae and Iceni Planning Consultants. Ridge was responsible for flood risk assessment and drainage, Bowland handled ecology and arboriculture, Mode handled highways, Sandy Brown handled acoustics, and Applied Geology took into account all the geo-environmental factors. Dean Young of Young & Co represented the landowner.

The proposed scheme is the latest of several industrial projects delivered as a joint venture by HBD and the Barnfield group. EAST, an 18-acre strategic development site, is also located in Preston and its first phase of 70,000 square feet has been fully let prior to practical completion and the remainder of the site is up for grabs. The partnership also developed an 11.5-acre site in Huyton, Beacon 62, creating approximately 357 new jobs and transforming an important gateway site.

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The U of I will offer three associate degrees this fall https://e-jemed.org/the-u-of-i-will-offer-three-associate-degrees-this-fall/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 22:54:23 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/the-u-of-i-will-offer-three-associate-degrees-this-fall/ MOSCOW, Idaho – Three new shortened degree programs offered this fall at the University of Idaho aim to meet growing workforce needs. College of Natural Resources programs prepare students for jobs in fire mitigation, forestry operations, and nursery management after two years of study, instead of four. The offerings, approved by the State Board of […]]]>

MOSCOW, Idaho – Three new shortened degree programs offered this fall at the University of Idaho aim to meet growing workforce needs.

College of Natural Resources programs prepare students for jobs in fire mitigation, forestry operations, and nursery management after two years of study, instead of four. The offerings, approved by the State Board of Education in April, are the first associate degrees at the University of Idaho.

Students develop essential skills through flexible coursework and hands-on training while forming partnerships with private and public forests, nurseries, and real-world businesses.

“These new Associate of Science degrees are essential to fulfilling our land-grant mission,” said Charles Goebel, head of the Department of Forest, Rangeland and Fire Sciences at the U of I. Students in these programs use our unique resources and expertise to help meet the workforce needs of the growing forestry and wildfire industries.

In the AS in forest exploitation and technologystudents work in one of the nation’s top forestry programs for quality and value, using commercial harvesting equipment and technology to help manage the University of the University’s 10,000+ acre experimental forest Island near Moscow.

The students of the AS in Forest Nursery Management and Technology Engage in an experiential commercial tree nursery program with an emphasis on practices, technology, and operations unique to the North American tree nursery industry. Forest Nursery students focus on the propagation and production of native trees, shrubs and plants in controlled-environment greenhouses located at the Pitkin Forest Nursery at the U of I in Moscow.

Based on the college’s nationally ranked BS in Ecology and Fire Management, the AS in Fuel and Forest Fire Technology is a flexible online program ideal for future permanent and seasonal employees employed as wildland firefighters and fire suppression technicians. Students collaborate with faculty experts and an extensive network of federal and state stakeholders.

Additional opportunities for AS students include networking opportunities with partner industries and completion of Idaho’s nationally recognized Logger Education and Advance Professionalism (LEAP) program and Office of Personnel Management Federal Series certification. Students seeking associate degrees through these programs can continue their education toward a Bachelor of Science degree.

For more information, contact the Department of Forestry, Range, and Fire Science at frfs@uidaho.edu.

Media Contact:

Steven shook
Professor of Forestry and Sustainable Products
University of Idaho
208-885-6802
Shook@uidaho.edu

Charles Gobel
Professor of Forest Ecosystem Restoration and Ecology
University of Idaho
208-885-7311
Cgoebel@uidaho.edu

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YSU gives greenhouse a new name | News, Sports, Jobs https://e-jemed.org/ysu-gives-greenhouse-a-new-name-news-sports-jobs/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 05:16:26 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/ysu-gives-greenhouse-a-new-name-news-sports-jobs/ YOUNGSTOWN — The Ward Beecher Science Hall greenhouse at Youngstown State University is named the Sandy Simon Greenhouse in recognition of a $450,000 donation to renovate the facility. The greenhouse consists of three greenhouse chambers. The renovation included upgrades to heating, ventilation and air conditioning. The embellishment of the adjoining hallway and the […]]]>

YOUNGSTOWN — The Ward Beecher Science Hall greenhouse at Youngstown State University is named the Sandy Simon Greenhouse in recognition of a $450,000 donation to renovate the facility.

The greenhouse consists of three greenhouse chambers. The renovation included upgrades to heating, ventilation and air conditioning. The embellishment of the adjoining hallway and the entrance to the greenhouse was also completed, along with other elements.

The renovation brought the third bay of the greenhouse – known as the research-ready chamber – back into use, having been unusable for several years.

“The renovated ‘research-ready’ array will provide faculty and students with the opportunity to do real research. It hasn’t been an option for over 16 years and now it is, said Ian Renne, associate professor of ecology.

The updated chamber will also allow for reliable plant breeding in terms of growing vegetables and native perennials for community gardens, and for undergraduate lab exercise use for STEM students.

Sandy Simon has always had a love for nature. She was born in Youngstown and raised in Liberty with her parents and her brother, Michael. She eventually bought a house and a horse farm in Vienna with over 75 acres of land which allowed her to enjoy a variety of trees and wildlife. On the farm, named Double S Ranch, she has bred, bred, trained and shown horses for over 30 years.

Simon was also interested in the world of herbs. As the owner and operator of Moonhawk Herbals, she grew, packaged, and sold herbs, as well as educational courses on their benefits.

When Simon died in 2016, his estate was left to a trust who decided to donate the proceeds from the sale of his farm to name and renovate the greenhouse. A small dedication took place last week.



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Florida’s Randy Wayne White | News, Sports, Jobs https://e-jemed.org/floridas-randy-wayne-white-news-sports-jobs/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 20:48:45 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/floridas-randy-wayne-white-news-sports-jobs/ Ironically, I was introduced to my favorite author not in a library or bookstore, but rather in a restaurant. During a 2012 visit to Florida’s Sanibel Island, my wife and I wandered into Doc Ford’s Rum Bar & Grille, named after a thriller series by Florida writer Randy Wayne White. There, […]]]>


Ironically, I was introduced to my favorite author not in a library or bookstore, but rather in a restaurant.

During a 2012 visit to Florida’s Sanibel Island, my wife and I wandered into Doc Ford’s Rum Bar & Grille, named after a thriller series by Florida writer Randy Wayne White. There, in addition to a great meal, I bought an autographed copy of White’s new book, and it did. I was hooked.

Marion de White “Doctor” Ford is a marine biologist in Sanibel, a beautiful low-key tourist mecca just off Fort Myers on the Gulf Coast. Although Ford prefers to hang out in his lab and boat among many nearby islands, his experience as a retired NSA agent suits him well for the mysteries, kidnappings, murders and other cases he has fallen into since then. Doc’s debut in 1990.

Ford’s 26 books provide unparalleled summer reading for beaches, poolsides and airport layovers. Expertly plotted and meticulously researched, White’s novels blend biting action with an invigorating evocation of life on Sanibel, a third of which is a wildlife refuge.

A sort of thinking man action novel, your typical Ford story filters events through Marion’s informed and pragmatic approach to science and crime. He’s a man, and he doesn’t tolerate fools. Yet White also tackles mysticism and the supernatural via Ford’s best friend Tomlinson – an overgrown hippie with a predilection for mind-altering substances, Zen Buddhism and attractive women.

Amid twisting intrigue and moving detail about Gulf Coast ecology, White distills remarkable wisdom. Some samples:

“Guilt is the curse of those who care.”

“I don’t believe in large-scale conspiracy theories. If I ever meet more than three or four people who can actually keep a secret, then maybe I’ll reconsider.

“There are hundreds of gated communities in Florida. Door or no door, rare are the communities. The developers bulldoze an oversized patch of brush, a truckload of grass and palm trees to dull the stench of scarred earth, then mask their domino trap with a woodsy name – Cedar Lakes, Cypress Vista, Oak Hills – and presto! an instant habitat for people looking for an instant life.

“The only real death we suffer is the things that aren’t done.”

High-end Fords include: “Twelve Mile Limit”, “Ten Thousand Islands” “Dead Silence” and the dazzling, impossible to put down “Black Widow”. As you can probably tell, these gritty adventures aren’t for kids.

Fortunately, White recently launched “Sharks Incorporated,” a young adult series featuring teenage protagonists, with Doc as a minor character. I haven’t read the last one (“Crocs” March 2022), but the first two are atmospheric and suspenseful – the classic White toned down for the youngsters.

Besides Ford and “Sharks Inc.”the author’s oeuvre includes four novels about Doc’s friend Hannah Smith, eight non-fiction works (including anthologies with titles as evocative as “Bat Fishing in the Rainforest”), and several early thrillers written under the pen names Carl Ramm and Randy Stryker.

Born in Ohio in 1950, White left college to work as a Florida reporter and tackle fishing guide. He launched his literary career as Ramm and Stryker, writing 18 novels in just four years (the first came off his typewriter in just nine days).

With a bibliography spanning nearly 60 titles, White also continues to co-own Doc Ford’s restaurants, now in four different Gulf Coast locations.



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In our opinion: Goldendale’s energy proposal needs checking https://e-jemed.org/in-our-opinion-goldendales-energy-proposal-needs-checking/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 13:03:11 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/in-our-opinion-goldendales-energy-proposal-needs-checking/ Additionally, the lower tank would sit on the cleared site of a former aluminum smelter – a fitting repurposing of land that has been abused by heavy industry for years. But doubts about the project are widespread. Among them, officials from the Yakama Nation say the project would desecrate cultural lands. “It’s the thing we […]]]>

Additionally, the lower tank would sit on the cleared site of a former aluminum smelter – a fitting repurposing of land that has been abused by heavy industry for years.

But doubts about the project are widespread.

Among them, officials from the Yakama Nation say the project would desecrate cultural lands. “It’s the thing we protect,” Jerry Meninick, the country’s deputy cultural director, told Northwest Public Broadcasting last year. “And I know it doesn’t make sense to others, but to us it means everything.” Jeremy Takala, a citizen of Yakama, said, “Cultural resources are not a renewable thing for us. How much land – our land – still needs to be sacrificed?

Similar concerns about the physical degradation of land are shared by environmental groups.

Other issues have been raised by energy consultants, who say the profitability of the project is uncertain. Idaho-based Tony Jones analyzed the proposal, as well as similar plans in Oregon, as requested by news outlet Investigate West.

“For these projects to be profitable, they will need eight to 10 hours of the high prices that come with high demand, Jones said. “But instead they get one to two hours.”

Investigate West said Jones estimates the Goldendale project would require an electricity price of $102 per megawatt hour to generate profits. In April, during an unseasonal cold snap, the price averaged $45. The Northwest Power and Conservation Council predicts that by 2026, electricity in the region will cost between $12 and $17 per megawatt hour.

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Why a happy life in China? Let’s count the paths https://e-jemed.org/why-a-happy-life-in-china-lets-count-the-paths/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 11:44:02 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/why-a-happy-life-in-china-lets-count-the-paths/ A flag-raising ceremony to celebrate the 72nd anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China is held at Tian’anmen Square in Beijing, capital of China, Oct. 1, 2021. /Xinhua A flag-raising ceremony to celebrate the 72nd anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China is held at Tian’anmen Square in Beijing, […]]]>

A flag-raising ceremony to celebrate the 72nd anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China is held at Tian’anmen Square in Beijing, capital of China, Oct. 1, 2021. /Xinhua

A flag-raising ceremony to celebrate the 72nd anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China is held at Tian’anmen Square in Beijing, capital of China, Oct. 1, 2021. /Xinhua

Editor’s note: Alessandro Golombiewski Teixeira is National Thousand Talent Professor Emeritus of Public Policy at Tsinghua University’s School of Public Policy and Management and Professor of International Business at Schwarzman College, Tsinghua. He is a former Special Economic Advisor to the President of Brazil and a former Brazilian Minister of Tourism and Minister of Development, Industry and Foreign Trade. He was also president of the World Investment Association (WAIPA). The article reflects the views of the author, and not necessarily those of CGTN.

In 2018, Chinese President Xi Jinping first proposed that “people’s happiness is the greatest human right”. People’s welfare has always been the goal of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). As a professor of public policy and management at Tsinghua University, I worked, lived and traveled in China for several years, where I personally experienced and witnessed the happy life of Chinese people. Their happiness comes from China’s rapid transformation, which can be seen in the details.

The greatest thing about living in China is convenience. The ubiquitous shared bikes, rail transport, high-speed trains and airplanes can take me anywhere and anytime.

The highly developed e-commerce network helps me quickly buy and receive everything I need. Whether I want to drink tea from Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, eat snacks from Shanxi province, or buy handicrafts from Sichuan province, all I have to do is press my phone and it will be delivered to me in a day or two.

“Fast” is the buzzword of contemporary China. Since the era of reform and opening up, China’s economy has grown by leaps and bounds, leading the country to rise at an unprecedented speed.

The latest example of “China’s speed” is the construction of Leishenshan (Thunder God Mountain) and Huoshenshan (Fire God Mountain) hospitals in a short period of time at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. The rapid development and expansion reflects a desire for progress, development, growth of the middle class, and a maturing consumer market across society. In China, there is an inextricable link between the pursuit of “speed” and improving people’s lives.

Happiness in China is not only in the prosperous metropolises, but also in the vast rural areas. As China steps up its rural revitalization strategy, it is strengthening rural infrastructure and public services, while building beautiful villages that are liveable. Farmers who were once plagued by poverty and disease find themselves on the road to happiness.

Guilin, in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region in southern China, is a scenic tourist city known worldwide for its beautiful scenery. When I visited Yangshuo County in Guilin, I was impressed by the good blend of modern civilization and traditional culture.

Under the local government policy, the cadres led the people to create a new four-pronged rural tourism development strategy “tourism + industry + ecology + culture”. Many locals who quit their jobs have returned to do business – rafting, fruit growing, operating farm caravans, as well as repairing old houses and running bed and breakfasts (B&Bs). A number of special old houses and guesthouses have sprung up in the village, breathing new life into old houses that carry historical memories.

Relying on the tourist advantages of Yangshuo, the villagers have exploited the rural leisure tourism very well, all becoming rich and building new houses. They were also pressured by local Party branches to change their mindset, production methods, living environment and stereotypes. I’ve seen local residents leave their doors unlocked at night and they tell me that this sense of security and trust boosts their sense of well-being.

A view of Ziyuan County in south China’s Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, April 29, 2021. /Xinhua

A view of Ziyuan County in south China’s Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, April 29, 2021. /Xinhua

Confucius, the great sage of China, said, “What tortures people is inequality rather than shortage of manpower. What gnaws at their souls is chaos instead of poverty. The Chinese people have not only solved the problems of “scarcity” and “poverty”, but are now making great strides towards “equality” and “security”. The CPC plans to achieve basic parity in public services by 2035, and by 2050, the basic achievement of common prosperity for all will be achieved, and the Chinese people will enjoy a happier and more More comfortable. »

In 2021, the Chinese government supports Zhejiang Province as a National Model Area for Common Prosperity. Fair employment opportunities are one of the important prerequisites for achieving common prosperity.

In Taizhou, Zhejiang Province, I saw the government provide quality off-farm employment to farming villages. By introducing whole chains of non-polluting labor-intensive industries and making full use of unused land or houses in villages to build common wealth workshops, the government provides villages with projects, jobs to households and skills to people, increasing employment and incomes. of villagers. A villager in her 50s told me that she worked directly at home, earning money and taking care of her family.

In order to obtain fair employment opportunities, Zhejiang Province has also launched a high-quality agricultural cultivation program with the aim of making the “cake” bigger; improve the training of skills adapted to the employment of migrant workers and the training of new trades and new industries. The program focused on farmer entrepreneurship, which guided farmers to join various companies to cooperate in entrepreneurship. This encourages the growth of work-sharing and multi-channel flexible employment, and farmers are more likely to be employed in domestic services, elderly care and other fields. The above measures have helped establish a long-term mechanism to address the lack of opportunities and resources for low-income groups.

These stories are played out every day in various parts of China. I met different people but they have the same smiling faces in different provinces like Yunnan, Jiangsu, Fujian, Guangdong, Hebei and others. I learned during this time in China that development can be achieved with social and economic inclusion. The Chinese people have driven China’s rapid rise and reaped the benefits. They will gradually close the quality of life differences in the future. This will hopefully lead to happier and better lives.

(If you would like to contribute and have specific expertise, please contact us at opinions@cgtn.com. Follow @thouse_opinions Twitter for the latest comments in CGTN’s Opinion section.)

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IN OUR COMMUNITIES | News, Sports, Jobs https://e-jemed.org/in-our-communities-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 04:17:07 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/in-our-communities-news-sports-jobs/ Funfly set up today The Centaur Ra/C Club is hosting a Funfly from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. today at Centaur Field located, 8473 County Home Road, Lisbon, opposite the pound. FREE ENTRANCE. Pilots meeting at 9 a.m. The event will include music, food, drinks, prizes and a 50/50 raffle. For more information, […]]]>

Funfly set up today

The Centaur Ra/C Club is hosting a Funfly from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. today at Centaur Field located, 8473 County Home Road, Lisbon, opposite the pound. FREE ENTRANCE. Pilots meeting at 9 a.m. The event will include music, food, drinks, prizes and a 50/50 raffle. For more information, call 330-234-8948.

Rebel Fest planned

The local Crestview PTO will host the Rebel Festival on Saturday, June 11 from noon to 6 p.m. outside Crestview Elementary School. The event is open to the community and admission is free. There will be six bouncy houses, two bouncy obstacle courses, two bouncy slides, a foam pit, and other Confetti House Carnival-themed activities. Pony rides and a mini-farm will also be offered from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. Elsa and Spiderman from Heroes and Tiaras will be available to meet and take pictures from 1-3 p.m. In addition to these activities, there will be face painting, carnival games, a raffle with over 75 items, as well as food trucks and various foods and beverages sold by Crestview sports organizations. Proceeds from the event will be used to support local Crestview schools, students, staff and community for the 2022-2023 school year. Email the PTO at crestviewlocalpto@gmail.com with any questions.

Veterans Picnic on July 23

Preparations for the annual Veteran Appreciation Picnic are underway. It will be held in Calcutta Square, behind McDonalds on State Route 170 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on July 23. This day is dedicated to veterans and active military personnel and shows their appreciation for their service. All veterans and serving military are invited and may bring a guest.

Cub Scout Day Camp

The Buckeye Council Boy Scouts of America Sandy Beaver District will host its annual Cub Scout Day Camp from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. June 13-17 at the McKinley Scout Reserve in Lisbon. This year’s theme is “Jurassic Cubs” and includes archery, BB guns, slingshots, water activities, fishing, nature and ecology, basic first aid, emergency preparedness, field sports, hiking, crafting, and various science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM)-based scouting skills centered around a prehistoric dinosaur theme. Representatives from county, state and municipal agencies will be on hand throughout the week, providing hands-on expertise and demonstrations to all attendees. “Friday Family Day” will end the program with a bonfire, special visitors and an overnight family camping trip (weather permitting). Additional instructions will be provided in advance by the camp administration staff and available in the Participant Handbook which will be emailed to all unit leaders, parents and participants prior to the first day of camp. Any boy or girl between the ages of 6 and 10 enrolled in the Scout program is welcome and must complete the registration process prior to the start of camp. Online registration can be done now through June 10 at https://mycouncil.buckeyecouncil.org/Event/8332/Register. Mail-in entries should be made to the Buckeye Council Office Registrar at 2301 13th Street, NW, Canton, OH 44708 or by calling 330-580-4272. Information materials and medical forms can be viewed on the board’s website or by contacting Gregg Warner, Camp Administrative Director, at gregg.warner9244@gmail.com or 330-261-5413 or Krista Hawkins, Program Director from camp, at khawkins512@gmail.com or 330-341-0516 (buckeyecouncil.org).

Alliance Bookmobile

Expect the bookmobile to roll into the Alliance area this summer. The 34-foot Library on Wheels has 21 scheduled weekly stops in June, July and August, including a return to the Alliance Farmers’ Market at its new location at the corner of Union Avenue and State Street. The Bookmobile will offer take-out craft projects (while supplies last) for children when it stops at the market on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. between June 25 and August 20. works. Users will be able to consult the documents of the bookmobile. They can even put items on hold and request to pick them up from the bookmobile at any of the public stops the bookmobile will make this summer. For a full schedule of stops, including an interactive map, visit https://www.rodmanlibrary.com/content/bookmobile-sets-2022-summer-schedule.

Point 5K Fun Run/Walk

The Mahoning Valley Rescue Mission will be hosting the Third Annual Point 5K Fun Run/Walk at White House Fruit Farm in Canfield on Saturday, July 9, to support the Rescue Mission General Fund. The race will start at 10 a.m. Friends attending this event will enjoy a 1,640 foot ride around the grounds of White House Fruit Farm. Registration is $5 per guest and will include a mid-run/walk donut and a Point 5k oval car sticker for all finishers. Register online at www.rescuemissionmv.org/point5k. Follow the signs to the designated parking area and the race start line.




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EPA proposes rescinding Trump’s controversial water permit policy https://e-jemed.org/epa-proposes-rescinding-trumps-controversial-water-permit-policy/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 17:34:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/epa-proposes-rescinding-trumps-controversial-water-permit-policy/ The EPA today proposed a rule that would reshape state and tribal permit reviews under the Clean Water Act, reversing a Trump-era policy that has rocked Capitol Hill, industry and environmental groups. The proposed rule establishes a process under Section 401 of the Act by which developers of pipelines, power lines, mines and other projects […]]]>

The EPA today proposed a rule that would reshape state and tribal permit reviews under the Clean Water Act, reversing a Trump-era policy that has rocked Capitol Hill, industry and environmental groups.

The proposed rule establishes a process under Section 401 of the Act by which developers of pipelines, power lines, mines and other projects apply for federal permits to discharge into waterways and regulated wetlands.

For the first time, EPA’s proposal allows states and tribes to participate in defining a “reasonable time” to conduct such reviews – an issue that has sparked political fights in the past – and restore the flexibility on what states and tribes consider when reviewing claims, says EPA fact sheet.

EPA Administrator Michael Regan said the proposal would align the review process with the Clean Water Act while restoring a “broader and more environmentally protective scope of review” under the Act. 401.

“For 50 years, the Clean Water Act has protected water resources that are essential to thriving communities, vibrant ecosystems and sustainable economic growth,” Regan said in a statement. “The EPA’s proposed rule builds on that foundation by empowering states, territories, and tribes to use the authority granted by Congress to protect precious water resources while supporting much-needed infrastructure projects that create jobs and strengthen our economy.”

Environmental groups and Democrats applauded the proposal, which is now open for 60 days of public comment.

“The Clean Water Act very clearly gives states, territories and tribes the ability to protect the quality of their water when projects are permitted or authorized, said Senate Environment and Public Works Chairman Tom Carper (D-Del.).

New Mexico Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham (D) also welcomed the proposed rule, saying it would allow states, territories and tribes to protect their water resources “as they see fit”. She applauded EPA’s “collaborative approach to ensuring that our state and federal partnership on this important issue leads to improved water quality for ecosystems, cultural uses, and continued economic growth.”

Karen Harbert, president and CEO of the American Gas Association, said the group is concerned that Biden’s proposal may stray too far from what Congress intended when it passed the Clean Water Act and n increase the cost of energy infrastructure.

“It shouldn’t take longer to get permits and approvals for a pipeline than it does to build one,” Herbert said in a statement. “A few states have abused their authority under Section 401 of the Clean Water Act to try to block projects they dislike for unrelated reasons. They concocted non-water quality objections and took over a year to review.

“Restore some of the discretion”

The proposal appears to expand the scope of what states and tribes can consider when reviewing permit applications and relaxes strict deadlines that would have been imposed under the Trump administration.

Under the Biden administration’s proposal, for example, developers could request a meeting with regulators a month before applying for a permit, a decision that could lead to early coordination. The proposed rule also sets out what applicants would need to show to apply for a permit.

And the proposal allows states and tribes to participate in determining what constitutes a “reasonable period of time” to review the application for certification, a clock that starts ticking when states or tribes receive an application for a developer permit.

Under Section 401 of the Clean Water Act, states and tribes have one year to issue their certifications before they are considered to have relinquished their authority, but sometimes that time is exceeded.

By comparison, Trump-era regulations attempted to keep states and tribes within the one-year time limit for exams.

The EPA proposal also specifies that when states, tribes or territories receive an application for certification, they can verify “whether the activity as a whole will comply with water quality requirements, which include laws state or tribal rights related to water quality”.

The EPA said such an approach would allow “a certification authority to comprehensively assess the water quality impacts of a federally licensed or licensed project.”

“Certification authorities may assess the impacts of any aspect of project activity that may affect water quality,” the EPA wrote. “This approach restores the broader, more environmentally protective scope that the Supreme Court affirmed in 1994.

Ben Cowan, a Houston-based environmental lawyer at Locke Lord LLP who works with major pipeline and energy projects, said that while the 60-day default period is important, it appears certification authorities will be in able to negotiate extensions and he expects this EPA to be flexible.

“The Biden EPA restores some of the discretion of certification authorities that the Trump rule had limited by imposing a one-year deadline and limiting the scope of their review,” he said. “It provides more definition to the process, which could be helpful, but it gives CAs the ability to look at projects more broadly.”

Legal control

The debate over Section 401 of the Clean Water Act made its way to the Supreme Court earlier this year after Republican-led states asked judges to overturn a federal judge’s decision that had blocked the rule Trump while the Biden administration worked to replace her.

In a short order issued through the Supreme Court’s emergency roll, five members of the conservative wing agreed to revive the Trump rule, which dismantled about 50 years of precedent for how states, tribes and the federal government had addressed water quality certifications. They did not explain their reasoning (green wireApril 6).

Four justices made their frustrations known, with Chief Justice John Roberts joining in dissenting Justice Elena Kagan denouncing the order as an abuse of the court’s emergency – or “shadow” – role.

The underlying question of the legality of the Trump rule now rests with the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, which is considering whether Senior Judge William Alsup of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California erred last year when he concluded that the settlement violated decades of Supreme Court precedent.

Alsup, a Clinton appointee, cited the 1994 court ruling in Jefferson County Public Utility District No. 1 v. Washington Department of Ecologywho said states could require federally approved hydroelectric projects to maintain minimum stream flow, even though this issue is not directly addressed in the Clean Water Act (green wireOctober 25, 2021).

The EPA referenced this decision in its fact sheet today.

“This approach restores the broader, more environmentally protective scope that the Supreme Court affirmed in 1994,” the agency wrote.

The issue of the timing of state and tribal water certifications has also come under legal scrutiny.

In a 2019 case, for example, the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit faulted California and Oregon for engaging in a program to reset the clock on dam permit renewal approvals, rather than handing over the decision to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. (green wireJanuary 25, 2019).

The Supreme Court later declined to review the DC Circuit’s decision.

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MSU News: Montana State University students named 2022 Udall Scholars https://e-jemed.org/msu-news-montana-state-university-students-named-2022-udall-scholars/ Tue, 31 May 2022 19:17:55 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/msu-news-montana-state-university-students-named-2022-udall-scholars/ Cassandra Baker, a math junior from Lame Deer, won an Udall Fellowship in the Tribal Public Policy category. Photo by Adrian Sanchez-Gonzalez/MSUTwo Montana State students named Udall Scholars Tuesday, May 31, 2022 By Carol Schmidt MSU News Service Two Montana State University students have won the prestigious Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation […]]]>
Cassandra Baker, a math junior from Lame Deer, won an Udall Fellowship in the Tribal Public Policy category. Photo by Adrian Sanchez-Gonzalez/MSU

Two Montana State students named Udall Scholars

Tuesday, May 31, 2022

By Carol Schmidt

MSU News Service

Two Montana State University students have won the prestigious Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation Udall Scholarship. Cassandra Baker, a Lame Deer junior specializing in math education, won the scholarship in the tribal public policy category. Atticus Cummings, a Bozeman junior specializing in interdisciplinary directed studies with a focus on architecture, chemical engineering and sociology, was nominated as a researcher in the environmental category. Baker and Cummings were among 55 students from colleges and universities nationwide to be selected as 2022 Udall Scholars, said Ilse-Mari Lee, dean of MSU Honors College. “We are very proud of Cassandra and Atticus, who have been named 2022 Udall Scholars. Cassandra, in recognition of her significant contributions to Montana’s tribal communities, and Atticus, for her efforts on our campus to protect our natural environment, said Lee. “As servant leaders, they will join a national network for Udall Scholars who have truly made a difference in their communities.”

The Udall Foundation is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1992 to provide federally funded scholarships to students wishing to pursue careers related to the environment, as well as Native American students pursuing a tribal public policy or career in the field of indigenous health. Udall Scholars receive $7,000 to be used for academic expenses. The scholarships honor the legacy of Morris Udall and Stewart Udall.

Cassandra Baker is a member of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe who uses mathematical modeling techniques to assess the sustainability of the Northern Cheyenne language. She also uses modeling techniques to activate interest in math, STEM fields and cultural heritage among local high school students. “We are experiencing language loss,” Baker said. She explained that she is developing tasks that will model language loss and determine the number of speakers needed to ensure survival. A non-traditional, first-generation student, Baker graduated from St. Labre Indian School in Ashland. She briefly attended a college in Maryland, but said she didn’t fit in there and moved back to Montana. She said when she was invited to tour the Montana State campus, she was happy to see an entire hall dedicated to Native American students — and now an entire building with the opening of American Indian Hall — as well as a supportive community. Baker said that at first math was her worst subject, but one of her high school teachers used the technique of having students mark work to increase the chance of getting a better grade. It helped her understand mathematical concepts and she came to develop a love for the subject. Baker said that once on campus, she had about 10 different jobs to support herself, and because she couldn’t afford textbooks, she borrowed them from the library. In the case of her statistics textbook, she could only consult it for a few hours at a time. “I had so many fines,” she recalls. However, she soon learned that there were people at MSU to support her. “If you ask, there are people who will help you.” Lisa Perry, director of Native American/Alaskan Native Student Success in the Department of Native American Studiesin the college of letters and sciences, said Baker is a promising student in the class and a role model for her colleagues. “I am thrilled that Cassandra has this opportunity as a Udall Scholar and to know that all of her hard work is being recognized,” Perry said. “Cassandra is a role model for her peers and young Aboriginal students. I welcome the opportunity to support Cassandra on her academic and personal journey, and I know she will use this opportunity to give back to Indigenous communities in a positive way. Baker said one of the turning points in his career at MSU was when Beth Burroughshead of the Department of Mathematical Sciences at the College of Letters and Science, hired Baker as an assistant to the department’s student office, where she worked on the department’s website. She also collaborated with Professor Marie-Alice Carlson in mathematics education on mathematical modelling. Through her work with the department, she thrived, she said. This summer, Baker will work with Carlson on the Montana Model Camp for college and high school students. She said students from her northern Cheyenne reservation and Salish-Kootenai Confederate reservations as well as students from non-reservation communities will use mathematical modeling techniques to understand and quantify the number of native speakers needed to keep tribal languages ​​alive. traditional. They will also develop a plan to support Indigenous languages. She said earning the Udall would help her expand that work by allowing her to network with other education professionals working in her field and learn other effective language retention techniques. Carlson said Baker is a reflective student who is unhappy with “surface-level” solutions to problems. “She makes every team she’s better on,” Carlson said. “Cassie is already pushing us into new territory as we develop culturally appropriate math tasks for the Montana Models camp. I feel really lucky to be able to work with her. In addition to winning the Udall Scholarship, Baker recently received a Cameron Presidential Fellowship and will be a Fellow of the Honors College. She recently won the Dan Voyich Community Involvement Award from the Department of Native American Studies and the American Indian/Alaska Native Student Success Program. She is a member of the Pi Mu Epsilon Honorary Mathematics Society and a recipient of the Milton F. Chauner Mathematics Fellowship. Baker is a tutor for the American Indian/Alaska Native Student Success program. She said that after graduating, she hopes to return to her reserve to teach math, eventually becoming a math education teacher. “Thinking back to my trip has been surreal,” Baker said. “I can’t believe I’ve come to where so many things could have stopped me. I really want other Indigenous students to realize that we can do anything and take our experiences and identity with us when we do.

Atticus Cummings

Montana State University student Atticus Cummings is pictured on campus Monday, Feb. 14, 2022, in Bozeman. Cummings was named a finalist for the Truman Fellowship. Photo by Kelly Gorham/MSU

Atticus Cummings was homeschooled until he enrolled at MSU, eventually deciding on a Directed Interdisciplinary Studies Diploma at Honors College to understand why certain promising technologies fail to take hold and to explore patterns found in nature for solving social and environmental problems, a discipline called biomimicry. Cummings’ degree encompasses work in the College of Arts and Architecturethe Norm Asbjornson College of Engineering and the college of letters and sciences. His current research focuses on engineering a building material capable of sequestering plastic waste and carbon. Its interdisciplinary directed studies program combines fields that it considers essential to a sustainable future: engineering, design and social sciences. Together, he believes these disciplines can help inspire people to embrace sustainable technologies and tackle climate change, as well as the communication needed to get climate change accepted. He said the Udall Fellowship would help him meet others working at the intersection of human and natural systems. “Atticus is truly a Renaissance man,” said Logan Schultz, associate dean of the Honors College. “It embodies the interdisciplinary creativity and goal-oriented education that we value in the Directed Interdisciplinary Studies program. His research, his services and his community involvement have inspired many and he is always ready to help other students. Everything he does is deeply rooted in a desire to improve our world, and it gives me great hope to see him flourish. Cummings is the recipient of a Cameron Presidential Scholarship and a Research Fellowship from the Vice President for Research and Economic Development for his self-directed research on enzyme-induced biomineralization on plastic waste at Wilking and Heveran Laboratories. As a student in the honors section of the Design Foundation course taught by Brian W. Brush, architecture instructor and director of the MSU Community Design Center, Cummings helped design a fair, obstacle course for all levels for HRDC Bozeman. He was a member of Honors Presents lecture series the Leadership Team, the Campus Climate Coalition, the Honors College Internal Advisory Board and the School of Architecture Student Advisory Council. He was a student senator at large and competes and teaches fencing. “Atticus has always pushed for a synergy of creative methods that are usually in disciplinary silos,” Brush said. “He has a remarkable ability to link knowledge across great distances and with his talent for design he will undoubtedly accomplish great things that address our world’s most pressing issues.” This fall, Cummings will pursue an internship in Architectural Biomimicry Ecology and Design in Singapore. After graduating from MSU, he plans to take a year off to pursue fieldwork in biomimicry. Eventually, he plans to get a master’s degree in architecture to create bio-inspired designs that will help climate refugees. He said his personalized program at MSU gave him the tools and resources to prepare him to enter this new field of science and design. “I’m really interested in using inspiration from the non-human world to create autonomous systems for humans,” Cummings said.


MSU News Service shares stories about Montana State University in Bozeman, Montana, and the accomplishments of its students, faculty, alumni, and staff. follow on Facebook and Twitter.


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