Ecology – E JEMED http://e-jemed.org/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 19:11:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://e-jemed.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1-150x150.png Ecology – E JEMED http://e-jemed.org/ 32 32 Your Green Home: Hollywood’s Perverse Vision of Climate Apathy | Chroniclers https://e-jemed.org/your-green-home-hollywoods-perverse-vision-of-climate-apathy-chroniclers/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 19:00:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/your-green-home-hollywoods-perverse-vision-of-climate-apathy-chroniclers/ “The point is, we really had it all – I mean, when you think about it. “ – Leonardo DiCaprio playing Dr. Randall Mindy, astronomer So, you watch the first quarter of a critical playoff game that will send its winner to the Super Bowl, when someone rushes into the room and lets out that […]]]>

“The point is, we really had it all – I mean, when you think about it. “

– Leonardo DiCaprio playing Dr. Randall Mindy, astronomer

So, you watch the first quarter of a critical playoff game that will send its winner to the Super Bowl, when someone rushes into the room and lets out that your dad has just had a heart attack and is being transported to. emergency in hospital.

Of course, you respond by saying, “Oh. OK, I’ll go there after the game.

This storyline mimics the premise of the wickedly funny and tragically depressing new Netflix feature film “Don’t Look Up.” Except that the subject of this sci-fi satire is both less and more personal than a family emergency – it’s the end of the world.

The story opens when Ph.D. astronomy candidate Kate Dibiasky (Jennifer Lawrence), during her nighttime deep space observations, discovers a huge comet heading straight for earth. She alerts her teacher, Dr. Randall Mindy (Leonardo DiCaprio), who calculates that the comet will strike in six months and is massive enough to cause an “extinction event”, ending life on the planet.

People also read …

This is not a spoiler. This is the opening scene of the film, and the real plot unfolds from there as Dibiasky and Mindy attempt to warn a largely skeptical, indifferent, and preoccupied world of their impending doom.

And not long after these events start happening, I and probably most of the viewers realize that “Don’t Look Up” is a parody of the insane and insane memes that permeate the ranks of dissiers and deniers of the World. climate change and ordinary citizens. (This is not mere speculation. The film’s creator, Adam McKay, said he devised the comet metaphor while discussing the frustrations of communicating climate realities with a climatologist.) At that point watching the plot and the wacky, alternate characters of the film becomes a kind of fun, making you laugh, swear, and shake your head at the same time.

There are the machinations of President Janie Orlean (Meryl Streep) and her White House staff, including her not-too-smart son and campaign donor appointees in critical government positions. Self-conscious about his image, which translates into his grip on power, this crew of clowns go through a series of botched responses to the crisis – but always have one last chance to save the planet.

Then there’s the media, represented by morning talk show co-hosts Jack Bremmer and Brie Evantee (Tyler Perry and Cate Blanchett). Their job is to avoid disturbing their viewer / consumer audiences by keeping everything enjoyable, so that their increasingly desperate interactions with Dibiasky and Mindy become, shall we say, “personal”.

And, of course, there is social media where the reality of the rapidly approaching comet is not determined by scientific analysis but by the number of likes and dislikes astronomers glean from their various public appearances. , which include a touring concert featuring famous singer Riley Bina (Ariana Grande). As you might expect, a subset of social media acolytes subscribe to the conspiracy theory that the comet does not exist – it’s just a ploy to establish government control.

Last, but not least, is Big Business, represented by billionaire Peter Isherwell (Mark Rylance), founder and CEO of BASH Enterprises and developer of a cell phone that tracks and ‘fixes’ its owner’s emotions, making sure so that he never feels sad or distressed. . Another big donor to the president, Isherwell obtains the last word on the fate of the planet, a plan executed by the administration of Orleans.

Some professional movie critics have denigrated “Don’t Look Up” as being too starry or too blunt.

OKAY. But as a regular guy who loves a good show, I say go to Netflix because you won’t want to miss this very relevant “comedy”.

After all, what is climate change if not a reality TV show, what about, THE reality TV show, in our green home?

Philip S. Wenz writes on the environment and related topics.

Visit his blog on firebirdjournal.com.


Source link

]]>
Oxford Agricultural Conference says Britain’s food system is ‘broken’ https://e-jemed.org/oxford-agricultural-conference-says-britains-food-system-is-broken/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 03:00:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/oxford-agricultural-conference-says-britains-food-system-is-broken/ Students who spoke at an agricultural conference on Friday hope they will help inspire UK farmers to ‘regenerate’ the food system, through the use of ‘non-prescriptive’ methods. Saraya Haddad and Warami Jackson spoke at the Oxford Real Farming Conference (ORFC) which took place virtually this year due to the pandemic. The conference highlights alternatives to […]]]>

Students who spoke at an agricultural conference on Friday hope they will help inspire UK farmers to ‘regenerate’ the food system, through the use of ‘non-prescriptive’ methods.

Saraya Haddad and Warami Jackson spoke at the Oxford Real Farming Conference (ORFC) which took place virtually this year due to the pandemic.

The conference highlights alternatives to conventional agriculture such as organic and regenerative agriculture, it aims to offer “all farmers a different type of agricultural conference”.

READ MORE: Clarkson’s Farm season two: everything we know so far

Saraya Haddad, a doctoral student at the University of Birmingham, explained that their speech was about a “transition to a just and regenerative food system”.

The 24-year-old student said: “Unfortunately, a lot of people don’t realize the food system is broken. It is designed to support capitalism by maximizing profit. Most of the large supermarkets we frequent primarily care about profit rather than sustainability.

“We discussed how we can all change our shopping habits to support the planet rather than harm it when we shop for groceries. ”

Miss Haddad added that they have also used the concept of “queer ecology” to make the transition to a better food system.

Although the word “queer” is often used to refer to sexuality or gender identity, the context of ecology means “anything anti-normative, that is, anything that disrupts systems. normative, ”explained Miss Haddad.

She said: “Queer ecology examines how, as humans, we have distorted nature by imposing our own categories on it.

“One example is wobbly fruits and vegetables. A third of the food produced in the world is wasted, or 1.3 billion astronomical tonnes of food per year. “Ugly” or “clunky” products represent up to 40% of annual food waste.

“For years myself and many others have been conditioned to believe that the fruits and vegetables we saw in supermarkets were what all fruits and vegetables looked like. I had no idea that carrots could have multiple bodies, or that tomatoes weren’t always the “perfect” bright red that I saw in the vegetable aisle.

“It had been conveniently left out that potatoes, the UK’s most wasted food, could come in many different forms. ”

Saraya Haddad hopes the food system can be made more sustainable. Image: Feedback.org

Miss Haddad and Miss Jackson hope their interview with people will educate people on how they can change their habits to support the environment.

“Local, seasonal and sustainable purchases are the key. We need to start avoiding traditional supermarkets more and spending more time in local farmers’ markets.

“It’s important to note that not everyone can afford to buy organic or local produce, but it is up to all of us to do what is possible within our means. ”

Keep up to date with all the latest news on our website, or follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram

To receive updates directly to your inbox, sign up for our newsletter here

Do you have a story for us? Contact our editorial staff at news@nqo.com or 01865 425 445.



Source link

]]>
New rules on fly ash disposal are “positive step”, but experts say health and ecological risks persist https://e-jemed.org/new-rules-on-fly-ash-disposal-are-positive-step-but-experts-say-health-and-ecological-risks-persist/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 01:30:33 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/new-rules-on-fly-ash-disposal-are-positive-step-but-experts-say-health-and-ecological-risks-persist/ New Delhi: Thermal and lignite-fired power plants that do not use 100% of the fly ash they generate in an “ecological” way will now be subject to sanctions, under a new set of rules notified by Narendra Modi’s government. Fly ash is the residue from the combustion of coal which, if disposed of improperly, is […]]]>

New Delhi: Thermal and lignite-fired power plants that do not use 100% of the fly ash they generate in an “ecological” way will now be subject to sanctions, under a new set of rules notified by Narendra Modi’s government.

Fly ash is the residue from the combustion of coal which, if disposed of improperly, is hazardous to health and the environment due to the concentrated presence of heavy metals.

The notification from the Union’s Ministry of the Environment, Forests and Climate Change intends to “establish a global framework for the use of ash, including an environmental compensation system based on the polluter pays principle”. This is a first in the country.

Thermal power plants must use 100% of their annual fly ash production over a three-year cycle to avoid penalties, the Dec. 31 notification says, adding that “at no time” should usage drop below 80 %.

Factories that fail to achieve 100% utilization levels during this period will be required to pay Rs 1,000 to the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) per tonne of unused ash.

The notification recognizes “legacy ash”, or the build-up of fly ash by thermal power plants over decades, indicating that they are to be used over a period of 10 years from the time the notification becomes applicable, from April 1, 2022. The inherited ash must be processed “beyond” the annual ash production by power plants, the notification said.

India has over 200 coal-fired power plants which generate a huge amount of fly ash. According to the Central Electricity Authority, India’s coal-fired power plants generated 232.56 million tonnes of fly ash in 2020-2021. Although 93 percent of it has been used, millions of tonnes accumulated over the years go unused.

A to study by think-tank Center for Science and Environment in March 2021 found that more than half of India’s power plants were not making full use of their fly ash and falling behind previous government targets.

The new notification will replace the 1999 notification which originally established rules for the use of fly ash. It will also replace the various modifications of the 1999 notification made in 2003, 2009 and 2016, all of which were aimed at managing the generation of fly ash.


Read also : The world has a new path to sustainable energy and net zero emissions – “green hydrogen”


“Ecological” use

The latest notification is largely similar to the draft which was released for public comment in April 2021.

The dumping of fly ash on the ground must be avoided and it must be treated in an “ecological” manner, says the new notification.

It lists “the only” ways fly ash can be used, which include making bricks, tiles, cement, building roads, and exporting to other countries. It also allows the “filling of low areas”, the filling of empty mines and “agriculture in a controlled manner based on soil analyzes”.

The notification adds that the compensation money collected by the CPCB for ash that has not been used will be used “for the safe disposal of unused ash” as well as for research on ash products.


Read also : Solid waste could play an important role in the supply of airlines


What the experts say

According to experts, the introduction of a penalty for non-compliance and recognition of inherited ash is a step in the right direction, but there are other aspects that the notification does not adequately address.

“The notification calls low-lying area filling an environmentally friendly method of using fly ash, but more often than not, it is a euphemism to dump ash irresponsibly. Dumping of ash into low-lying areas can result in serious ecological consequences, ”said Sehr Raheja, researcher at Manthan Adhyayan Kendra, a civil society organization that wrote to the government in April last year, when comments on the draft notification were requested.

A report by Manthan found that there had been eight major fly ash breaches between 2019 and 2021, leading to destruction and contamination.

While the notification states that all annual and old ashes are to be used, it also makes provision for ashes stored in dikes and ponds – structures built for the disposal of large amounts of ash – stating that as long as this storage is “stabilized” or recovered by growing plantations, CPCB certified coal-fired power stations may be excluded from the 10-year period.

“We are also concerned that this will create a loophole for coal-fired power plants not to use their legacy ashes,” Raheja added.

The Think tank Center for Policy Research (CPR) also submitted comments in April of last year, stating that a 10-year deadline to comply with 100% use of legacy ash “alleviates the legal burden of compliance but allows illegal dumping of overloaded ash dikes to continue »Despite the risk of accidents and contamination.

The CPR also said that the draft notification did not address the issue of the generation of fly ash, which is the underlying cause of the build-up and environmental damage. He also urged the government to recognize that fly ash poses a danger to public health.

“It is essential to take political action to link the use of fly ash to measures taken by the government to prevent illness and death and to provide health services. The environmental regulations that emerge from this ‘fly ash as a health risk’ approach have the potential to identify remedies to address the impact of the legacy and prevent future violations of the law, ”wrote the CPR in its comments.

However, the final notification does not include this point.

(Edited by Amit Upadhyaya)


Read also : 1260-150 – why power lines are the ‘greatest threat’ to the Indian great bustard



Source link

]]>
Green Panels, Engines, Challenges market share forecast to 2028 – Industrial IT https://e-jemed.org/green-panels-engines-challenges-market-share-forecast-to-2028-industrial-it/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 00:59:31 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/green-panels-engines-challenges-market-share-forecast-to-2028-industrial-it/ According to a new research report titled Ecological Board Market Global Industry Perspective, Comprehensive Analysis And Forecast by 2022-2028 This resulted in several changes in This report also covers the impact of COVID-19[feminine sur le marché mondial. Le rapport fournit des prévisions de revenus aux niveaux mondial, régional et national. Il fournit également une couverture […]]]>

According to a new research report titled Ecological Board Market Global Industry Perspective, Comprehensive Analysis And Forecast by 2022-2028

This resulted in several changes in This report also covers the impact of COVID-19[feminine sur le marché mondial.

Le rapport fournit des prévisions de revenus aux niveaux mondial, régional et national. Il fournit également une couverture complète des principaux moteurs de l’industrie, des contraintes et de leur impact sur la croissance du marché au cours de la période de prévision. À des fins de recherche, le rapport a segmenté le marché mondial des panneaux écologiques en fonction des types, de la technologie et de la région.

Obtenez un exemple de copie PDF du marché des conseils écologiques @ https://www.reportsinsights.com/sample/627796

Les principaux concurrents du marché mondial des panneaux écologiques sont :
Fletcher Building, Wilsonart, Panolam Industries, Kronospan, ASD, EGGER, Greenlam, OMNOVA Solutions, Merino, Abet Laminati, Arpa Industriale, Gentas, Sonae Indústria, PFLEIDERER, Trespa International, FORMILINE, LAMITECH, Stylam, Hopewell, Royal Crown Laminates, Zhenghang , Guangzhou G&P, SWISS KRONO, AOGAO, ATI Laminates, Dura Tuff, Timbmet, Prime Panels, PB China, Sternwood, Panelco, Bridec, Gunnersen, Borg, Woodstock Boards, Shandong Zhongtian Woo

Le « Rapport de recherche sur le marché mondial des panneaux écologiques » est une étude complète et informative sur l’état actuel de l’industrie du marché mondial des panneaux écologiques, en mettant l’accent sur l’industrie mondiale. Le rapport présente des statistiques clés sur l’état du marché des fabricants mondiaux de panneaux écologiques et constitue une source précieuse de conseils et d’orientation pour les entreprises et les particuliers intéressés par l’industrie.

Les principaux types de produits couverts sont :
Panneau écologique haute densité
Panneau écologique en mousse
Panneau écologique polymère
Autres

La couverture des applications sur le marché est :
Commercialement
Résidences
Autres

Pour obtenir ce rapport à un taux avantageux : https://www.reportsinsights.com/discount/627796

Marché du conseil écologique régional (production régionale, demande et prévisions par pays): –
Amérique du Nord (États-Unis, Canada, Mexique)
Amérique du Sud (Brésil, Argentine, Equateur, Chili)
Asie-Pacifique (Chine, Japon, Inde, Corée)
Europe (Allemagne, Royaume-Uni, France, Italie)
Moyen-Orient Afrique (Egypte, Turquie, Arabie Saoudite, Iran) Et Plus.

Le rapport de recherche étudie les performances passées, présentes et futures du marché mondial. Le rapport analyse en outre le scénario concurrentiel actuel, les modèles commerciaux courants et les avancées probables des offres des acteurs importants dans les années à venir.

Questions clés répondues par le rapport

  • Quel sera le taux de croissance du marché mondial des panneaux écologiques 2022 pour la période de prévision 2022 à 2028?
  • Quelle sera la taille du marché au cours de cette période estimée?
  • Quels seront les domaines de croissance au sein de l’espace de marché et sur quoi le participant devrait-il se concentrer pour obtenir un retour sur investissement maximal ?
  • Qui sont les principaux acteurs de l’industrie qui dominent le marché mondial Panneaux écologiques et quelles sont leurs stratégies commerciales pour rester en tête de la concurrence contre leurs rivaux?
  • Quels sont les types de défis qui entravent le développement de l’industrie dans le monde ?
  • Paysage concurrentiel du marché mondial des panneaux écologiques
  • Quelles sont les opportunités pour les propriétaires d’entreprise pouvez compter pour gagner plus de profits et rester compétitif pendant la période estimée?
  • Segments/régions potentiels et de niche affichant une croissance prometteuse
  • Une perspective neutre vis-à-vis des performances du marché du Global Ecological Board

Accédez à la description complète du rapport, table des matières, tableau de la figure, graphique, etc. @ https://www.reportsinsights.com/industry-forecast/ecological-board-market-627796

À propos de nous:

Reports Insights est la principale industrie de la recherche qui offre des services contextuels et Les données-des services de recherche centrés sur ses clients à travers le monde. Le cabinet aide ses clients à élaborer des stratégies commerciales et à réaliser une croissance durable dans leur respective domaine du marché. L’industrie fournit des services de conseil, des rapports de recherche syndiqués et des rapports de recherche personnalisés.

Nous contacter:

E-mail: [email protected]

Sales: [email protected]


Source link

]]>
Third Branch Finds Niche for Sustainable, Low Impact Logging on Horses in Vermont https://e-jemed.org/third-branch-finds-niche-for-sustainable-low-impact-logging-on-horses-in-vermont/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 06:20:36 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/third-branch-finds-niche-for-sustainable-low-impact-logging-on-horses-in-vermont/ Derek O’Toole works at a site in Northfield with his horses. O’Toole and Johnson co-founded Third Branch Logging in 2018 because they believe there is a market in Vermont for low-impact logging that emphasizes forest ecology rather than speed or volume. Photos by Erica Houskeeper by Christine McGowan, Vermont Forest Industry Network Brad Johnson would […]]]>

Derek O’Toole works at a site in Northfield with his horses. O’Toole and Johnson co-founded Third Branch Logging in 2018 because they believe there is a market in Vermont for low-impact logging that emphasizes forest ecology rather than speed or volume. Photos by Erica Houskeeper

by Christine McGowan, Vermont Forest Industry Network Brad Johnson would like wood products to be valued for the stand left in the forest, not just the dollar value of the wood removed.

“The lumber industry is sort of where the food industry was in the 1970s in terms of connecting the end product to the earth,” said Johnson, co-owner of Third branch horse logging in Braintree, Vermont. “People are just starting to understand that sustainability is not just about where your wood comes from, but also how it is harvested. “

Johnson founded Third Branch Horse Logging with Derek O’Toole in 2018 with two core values. First, they both enjoy working in the forest with horses and second, they believe that there is a market in Vermont for low impact logging that emphasizes forest ecology rather than speed. or volume.

“The wood you cut is not the product,” says Johnson. “The medium you leave behind is the product. Our take on sustainability is not about a benefit for me over the course of my life, but rather how it will benefit my children and grandchildren. The land I harvest today will be beautiful land, well stocked with a variety of mature and young trees that support wildlife habitat and ensure carbon sequestration for generations.

Partners Brad Johnson, Derek O’Toole and John Plowden. Johnson and O’Toole recently recruited a third partner, Plowden, who complements the team with cabinetmaking and milling training, enabling them to offer custom milling on site for customers.

A teacher by profession, Johnson left his post at Maine Coast Semester in 2000 where he taught environmental studies. Ready for change and eager to work outside of his hands, he enrolled in a fall apprenticeship at a small, diverse horse farm. “I didn’t know the front of a horse from the back,” he said. “I was about as raw as I could get to begin with.” But after only two weeks on the farm, Johnson knew he would never go back to work indoors.

“I was addicted,” he says. “I loved working with the horses all day and the work immediately made sense.”

Johnson moved with his young family to Randolph, Vermont in 2008, where he bought a single horse and a small tractor and began doing odd jobs in logging and farming. He joined a local CSA that used horses for farming where he met his current business partner, Derek O’Toole.

At first, O’Toole volunteered to help Johnson with logging work, just to have his team practice during the winter months, when farm work was less demanding. “We worked well together and had complementary skills,” said Johnson, “and ultimately it made sense to bring our teams together and form a company.”

An evolving business model.

Established in 2018, their first business model provided for more than 300 days of commercial logging work per year. They deeply believe in the benefits of working with horses in the forest and believe that commercial logging jobs are where they could have the most impact. “I have worked in the woods for 20 years,” Johnson said, “and I still haven’t seen a tool or technology that leaves a better, finer result in the woods than a horse for the kind of. goals I want to see. ”These goals include low impact logging that minimizes trail area, carbon footprint, soil erosion and soil compaction.

But operating a team of horses proved difficult during the winter months. “You just can’t move snow with horses the same way you can with a bulldozer,” Johnson said, “and towing a team on icy roads isn’t ideal either.”

Derek O’Toole, left, watches Brad Johnson chopping logs in Northfield.

The two regrouped, assessing where their teams would be of most value to landowners and landing on residential forestry jobs and horse-powered logistics projects. More in demand than commercial jobs, their new business model focuses on services such as high-risk tree felling, residential clearing, and winter sleigh rides. The regular income from these jobs allows them to choose the best commercial harvesting opportunities with horses – about one per year. “We like to say that our residential work supports our logging habit,” Johnson said.

Johnson and O’Toole recently recruited a third partner, John Plowden, who complements the team with cabinetmaking and milling training, enabling them to offer custom milling on site for customers. “We are in the Storming Norman phase,” Johnson said. “We’re looking at how the pieces fit together and how we make money. “

The goal: to have an impact and earn a living.

Even as they sort through the details and logistics of the business, they are crystal clear about their vision for the future: a logging company that values ​​forest ecology over short-term economic gains, working towards outdoors with the horses they love and earning a living wage. .

“I wish I could say that we get paid well, that we do the work that we love and that we have a positive economic and environmental impact. We’re not there yet, but I’m hopeful.

Johnson uses his own property as an example of how he sees his vision come to fruition. He owns a 94-acre woodlot made up mainly of white pine. The main objective of its forest management plan is ecology, which encompasses general objectives such as carbon sequestration, wildlife habitat, preservation of soil structure and protection of water quality in nearby Stoney Creek.

Derek O’Toole prepares his horses for work at a site in Northfield.

Second, he harvests wood to provide resources for his home and family, like firewood for heating and wood for their new pole barn, all of which are milled on site. Johnson is aware of his own carbon footprint and believes local and sustainably harvested wood products are part of the solution to climate change. In addition to the fact that wooden furniture and cabinets trap and store carbon indefinitely, the use of locally harvested wood reduces transport emissions and therefore the overall carbon footprint of the final product. And of course, using horses for harvesting instead of gasoline-powered equipment further reduces that footprint.

“Every piece of wood used for the pole barn was harvested from our land and crushed on site,” Johnson said. “Not everyone can do it, but it’s a model that we can talk to our customers about. “

Finally, Johnson hopes to earn enough money from the timber harvest to pay his taxes, although he is careful not to set a monetary goal for the harvest. “I try to think really holistically about woodland,” he said. “It’s not just a piggy bank that you open with a hammer every 10 years and collect the loose change. It is a living resource that, with good management, we can enjoy every year.

Still a relatively young company, Johnson uses her teaching experience to help advance their business model. He is passionate about ecology, climate change and leaving forests in better condition than he found them, just like his partners. But he realizes that traditional logging business models don’t always support a slower, lower-impact form of harvesting.

“It is important that we reflect on big issues such as long-term forest health and carbon sequestration, while simultaneously working towards a point where young people can earn a living and support their families by working in the woods,” Johnson said. “It starts with the fact that we think of wood in a different way. “

Derek O’Toole works in the woods with his horses in Northfield.

About the Vermont Forest Industry Network

Vermont’s forest products industry contributes $ 1.3 billion to the Vermont economy and supports more than 9,000 direct and indirect jobs in forestry, logging, processing, specialty woodworking, construction and wood heating (2017). These figures more than double when maple production and forestry recreation are taken into account. The Vermont Forest Industry Network creates a space for strong relationships and collaboration across the industry, including helping to promote new and existing markets for Vermont wood products. Learn more about www.vsjf.org.


Source link

]]>
New England shows it’s warming faster than the rest of the world in new study https://e-jemed.org/new-england-shows-its-warming-faster-than-the-rest-of-the-world-in-new-study/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 14:02:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/new-england-shows-its-warming-faster-than-the-rest-of-the-world-in-new-study/ A new report has been published in the Multidisciplinary digital publishing institute log showing a disturbing trend as temperatures in New England rise faster than anywhere else on the planet. New England’s ecology, economy and cultural heritage are rooted in its seasonal climate, according to a report published by two University of Massachusetts Amherst researchers, […]]]>

A new report has been published in the Multidisciplinary digital publishing institute log showing a disturbing trend as temperatures in New England rise faster than anywhere else on the planet.

New England’s ecology, economy and cultural heritage are rooted in its seasonal climate, according to a report published by two University of Massachusetts Amherst researchers, Joshua S. Young and Salem State University, Stephen S. Young, this seasonality is now changing as the world warms up due to human activity.

They found that temperatures in the area rose by more than 3.29 degrees Fahrenheit from 1900 to 2020.

“The four-season climate decline will have adverse effects on the ecology and economy of New England. There have already been signs of climate change in the New England region, ranging from increased heat waves and decreased snow cover to more extreme floods and droughts, ”the report says. .

The outdoor recreation industry supports over a million jobs in the Northeastern United States and provides an estimated $ 150 billion in spending to the regional economy and with climate change, warmer winters and cooler summers, it could be at risk, the study found.

The research explores temperature changes in New England at annual and seasonal levels from 1900 to 2020.

Governor Charlie Baker sign a sweeping climate bill was enacted in March, signaling a new era in Massachusetts plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, build a greener economy, and prioritize equity and sustainability environmental justice.

The new law, “A law creating a next generation roadmap for Massachusetts climate policy,” represents the most significant update to climate policy in the Commonwealth since the 2008 benchmark. Global Warming Solutions Act.

Under the new law, the state must achieve so-called “net” emissions by 2050, by 2030 emissions must be 50% lower than they were in the state in 1990 and by 2040, they should be 75% lower.

This warming diminishes the characteristic four-season climate of New England, causing changes in the region’s ecology and threatening rural economies throughout the region.


Source link

]]>
The rooftop greenhouse is a space on campus for ecological studies https://e-jemed.org/the-rooftop-greenhouse-is-a-space-on-campus-for-ecological-studies/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 22:22:12 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/the-rooftop-greenhouse-is-a-space-on-campus-for-ecological-studies/ By Olivia Tran December 29, 2021 The greenhouse on the roof of the Science and Research 2 building is used for various ecological studies carried out by students and faculty. | Kathryn Lenihan / The Cougar the tight on the roof of the Science and Research 2 building was a space for students and faculty […]]]>


The greenhouse on the roof of the Science and Research 2 building is used for various ecological studies carried out by students and faculty. | Kathryn Lenihan / The Cougar

the tight on the roof of the Science and Research 2 building was a space for students and faculty to conduct various experiments on ecological topics ranging from soil microbes to invasive plant species.

Although the greenhouse was renovated in 2016, it has been around for some time, according to associate professor Kerri Crawford. Before that, experiments had to be carried out at UH Coastal Center or on a smaller scale in laboratories.

Crawford’s research is currently focusing on how native plant species can adapt in response to other plants that invade ecosystems. If a native plant coexists with an invasive plant over several generations, specific traits and genetic codes can develop. These genetics can then be explored by scientists to help prevent the spread of invaders.

Crawford said the greenhouse allows him Research Team to conduct controlled experiments that they would not be able to do otherwise. A recent experiment involving over 2,000 plants, all with very specific watering needs, was made possible by the controlled conditions of the greenhouse.

“We were interested in how the amount of water a plant receives influences plant-microbe interactions,” Crawford said. “We found that if soils are wetter, microbes can disrupt the coexistence between plant species, which can be a problem in areas that receive more rainfall with climate change. “

Post-baccalaureate researcher Jakob Joachin is conducting his first independent experiment on these plant-microbe relationships in different ecological contexts, such as how water availability influences interactions between typically pathogenic fungi and grassland plants.

Joachin joined the Crawford Lab in the spring of 2018 when they were in their second year in an evolutionary biology course.

Joachin wasn’t sure what the research looked like or if they could do it to be funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experience for Post-Baccalaureate Students program and the intention to attend a graduate school for applied research in restoration.

“After my first summer of fieldwork (hunting grasshoppers and fighting mosquitoes), I was completely hooked,” Joachin said. “Falling in love with the day-to-day tasks of ecological research, I finally found myself asking new questions about work and ‘thinking like a scientist’. “

Amber Ooi, senior in biology, also found it rewarding to work in the greenhouse. Ooi joined the undergraduate research experiments program last summer, where she worked with another student to test whether the presence of plants helps prevent droughts from causing stress on soil microbial communities.

“We used the SR2 rooftop greenhouse to keep the 180 plants (at) a constant temperature as the Houston summers tend to get very hot,” Ooi said. “I learned a lot this summer about the investigative process behind research and making a lot of mistakes.”

Ooi hopes to publish a paper on this research next year and expand his interests in conservation ecology in the future.

Ooi recommends that undergraduates join the student organization Society for Advancement of Chicanos / Hispanics and Native Americans in Science if they are interested in research, as well as taking courses such as ecology, conservation, and plant physiology if they wish to specifically pursue ecological research.

“While there are currently no vacancies for research assistants, people are generally happy to discuss their research,” Crawford said. “Through their research experiences, some students are realizing that they want to go on to graduate school to earn a master’s or doctorate.”

[email protected]

Keywords: ecology, greenhouse, science and research 2



Source link

]]>
The mining pole fights against ecological problems: The Tribune India https://e-jemed.org/the-mining-pole-fights-against-ecological-problems-the-tribune-india/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 01:17:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/the-mining-pole-fights-against-ecological-problems-the-tribune-india/ Ravi Dhaliwal Bhoa has gained notoriety for being the epicenter of legal and illegal mining. For decades, foreigners have thoroughly exploited the Ravi and Ujh rivers. This means that the ecological balance of the area has become imbalanced to the point of reaching a point of no return. Past trend Prior to delineation in 2012, […]]]>

Ravi Dhaliwal

Bhoa has gained notoriety for being the epicenter of legal and illegal mining. For decades, foreigners have thoroughly exploited the Ravi and Ujh rivers. This means that the ecological balance of the area has become imbalanced to the point of reaching a point of no return.

Past trend

Prior to delineation in 2012, the segment was known as Narot Mehra. Seema Kumar of BJP was the very first MP from the renamed Bhoa constituency. Since 1985, Congress and the BJP have alternately won the seat.

Electoral force

Total number of electors – 1,70,908

Male – 89,942

Woman – 80,965

Third kind – 1

The main demands of the premises

  • 50 bed hospital
  • Brakes against illegal mining
  • Re-carpet of roads
  • Joint Government College

Taste the village of Maira Kalan on the banks of the Ravi. Rampant mining has caused the region’s water table to drop to levels so low that villagers have to travel to the nearby village of Kirri Khurd for daily drinking water supplies.

Enter seated Congress MLA Joginder Pal. He is loved by young people because he often faces the powerful bureaucracy. His verbal skirmishes with officers are told by local youth.

There are only two community health centers in Bhoa. Residents say a 50-bed hospital is the need of the hour. “Since Joginder Pal was elected MP, no school has been modernized,” says Seema Kumari. “We need a sugar mill, but the legislator is not paying attention to us,” says Lachman Singh, a sugarcane farmer.

Residents say that until illegal mining is stopped and sanity is restored, they will have to live in appalling conditions.


Source link

]]>
OPINION – The Kunming Declaration sounds the alarm for biodiversity conservation in the Great Bay region https://e-jemed.org/opinion-the-kunming-declaration-sounds-the-alarm-for-biodiversity-conservation-in-the-great-bay-region/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 09:09:45 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/opinion-the-kunming-declaration-sounds-the-alarm-for-biodiversity-conservation-in-the-great-bay-region/ Macao Affairs | december 2021 By Zhang Ruopiao On October 13, 2021, the 15th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (COP15) in Kunming, Yunnan Province, adopted a declaration on the need for concerted effort and a momentum to stop and reverse the loss of biodiversity. . […]]]>

Macao Affairs | december 2021

By Zhang Ruopiao

On October 13, 2021, the 15th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (COP15) in Kunming, Yunnan Province, adopted a declaration on the need for concerted effort and a momentum to stop and reverse the loss of biodiversity. . The Kunming Declaration embodies the political determination of the Chinese government to meet the challenges of biodiversity and jointly build a community of life on Earth. The Declaration commits to ensuring the formulation, adoption and implementation of an effective global biodiversity framework post-2020.

Zhang Ruopiao
Member of the Executive Board
Macau Institute for Corporate Social Responsibility in Greater China (MICSRGC)

The framework aims to reverse the current loss of biodiversity and put it on track for recovery by 2030, at the latest, to achieve the 2050 vision of living in harmony with nature. Along with the Kunming Declaration, China’s first white paper (an in-depth report), Conservation of biodiversity in China, was released in October this year, promising a new chapter for ecological conservation in China.

The term “biodiversity” refers to all of the variability of life on Earth, as well as the environments in which it thrives. The ecological goods and services of biodiversity provide the foundations for human civilization and long-term development (WWF (2018). Living Planet Report 2018). However, the world is facing a critical situation of unprecedented species extinction. The loss of biodiversity and the degradation of ecosystems pose a major threat to human survival and sustainable development. In 1972, the United Nations convened the Conference on the Human Environment. The participating countries signed the Declaration on the Human Environment, in which the conservation of biological resources was included in the 26 principles. In 1993, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) entered into force.

China is a vast country with complex and diverse landscapes and climates, making it one of the richest countries in the world in terms of biodiversity. However, rapid urbanization and industrialization have posed new dangers for species and ecosystems, as well as increased demand for their habitats. The adverse effects on biodiversity have been exacerbated by the overexploitation and uncontrolled growth of biological resources. Pollution has had a significant influence on biodiversity and aquatic and river ecosystems. Thus, China’s rapid economic expansion is not sustainable as it has exceeded its environmental capacity and ecological biocapacity in recent decades. To mitigate biodiversity loss, China has made significant progress in building an environmental reserve system and safeguarding endangered species since 2017. The Ministry of Natural Resources and provincial ecological red lines have been established. In addition, the monitoring of nature reserves has been strengthened to unprecedented levels and considerable and fruitful experience in biodiversity conservation has been gained.

On February 18, 2019, the Communist Party of China Central Committee and the State Council released the outline of the development plan for the Guangdong Bay Area, Hong Kong and Macao. The plan proposed to apply a strict ecological protection system while innovating a green and low-carbon development model. Over the past decades, urban development in the Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Greater Bay Area has caused ecological damage. For example, during industrialization and urbanization in the Panyu and Nansha districts of Guangzhou, most of the wetland landscapes were replaced by infrastructure, such as bridges, roads and ports. This change has resulted in serious damage to the insect biodiversity there.

According to Guangdong, Hong Kong and Macao Great Bay Area Ecological Footprint Report 2019, the Grande Baie region has only 0.27 hectares worldwide of biological capacity per capita, a quarter of the national average and a sixth of the world average. The Kunming Declaration also sounds the alarm bells for the conservation of biodiversity in this region. the Guangdong Marine Ecological Red Line Report shows that resource constraints on the coast of the Grande Baie region are increasing. In addition, the rate of loss of coastal wetlands in this area is high and the quality of marine organisms is declining.

The natural systems and biochemical cycles that accompany biodiversity are prerequisites for the prosperity of the Grande Baie region. Over the next 10 to 20 years, the region’s population is expected to increase dramatically, placing greater challenges on the ecological system. After a series of biodiversity-related summits, the Greater Bay Area is launching various programs to promote regional biodiversity. Specifically, the National Development and Reform Commission and the Ministry of Natural Resources jointly published the Key projects for biodiversity conservation in the Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Great Bay regionand the Three-Year Action Plan to Promote Ecological Protection, Restoration and Mitigation in the Coastal Zone of the Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Great Bay Region (2020-2022)These action plans further strengthen cooperation between Guangdong, Hong Kong and Macao in data sharing, scientific research and innovation to improve ecological corridors and biodiversity protection networks.

However, this article argues that most ecosystem services “provided” by nature are public goods, which fall under the category of “externalities” in the economic sense. Therefore, we cannot expect market forces alone to solve the problem of biodiversity loss. Government policy interventions are essential.

The global devastation of the COVID-19 epidemic is a harbinger that we need to be aware of the close connection between man and nature and the catastrophic consequences of breaking that link. At the same time, we must also be aware that we have ignored the even greater risks to humanity posed by global climate change and the sharp decline in biodiversity to date. Biodiversity is linked to human well-being and constitutes an essential basis for human survival and development. COP-15 calls for integrating biodiversity conservation into long-term socio-economic and industrial development planning. The COP-15 and the Kunming Declaration shed light on how the international community must work together to face these major risks in terms of biodiversity. The Grande Baie region faces complex challenges and opportunities for conserving biodiversity, and more than ever, placing biodiversity at the heart of sustainable development is essential for the future of ecological and community life and systems. who support them.


Source link

]]>
Kropotkin’s ecology https://e-jemed.org/kropotkins-ecology/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 07:04:24 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/kropotkins-ecology/ To obligate I will focus here on one aspect of his rich and extensive work, namely his seminal writings on social ecology. At the heart of human life, for Kropotkin, there was an essential “paradox” given that, on the one hand, humans were an intrinsic part of nature, the product of an evolutionary process, and […]]]>

To obligate

I will focus here on one aspect of his rich and extensive work, namely his seminal writings on social ecology.

At the heart of human life, for Kropotkin, there was an essential “paradox” given that, on the one hand, humans were an intrinsic part of nature, the product of an evolutionary process, and totally dependent on the World. Natural for food, water and air – for their very existence.

But on the other hand, humans were in a sense “separate” from nature: the earth itself had existed for billions of years, long before humans emerged, and humans, as a whole. specific beings, were rather unique in combining a high degree of self-awareness, deep sociality, and having developed complex symbolic cultures and technologies.

Indeed, humans are now described as having become a “geological force” on planet earth. Humans were sort of “separate” from nature.

What is important about Kropotkin is that he has always strived to keep these two dimensions of human social life together.

Operator

He thus combined humanism, with an emphasis on human action and human culture, and naturalism, fully recognizing the ecological dimension of human life, according to which humans are always “rooted in nature”. As a social philosopher, therefore, Kropotkin was fundamentally an ecological humanist, a social ecologist.

Two books he wrote (both based on articles published in the 1890s) illustrate his social ecology: they are “Fields, factories and workshops of tomorrow” (1899) and “Mutual aid: a factor of evolution ”(1902).

Towards the end of the 19th century, Kropotkin became increasingly concerned with two interrelated problems or developments.

One was the growing “gulf” that developed between the empty countryside of its inhabitants and more and more wildlife, and the city, with people living in misery and poverty in overcrowded housing and working in the city. factories in which conditions were unsanitary, exploitative and completely undemocratic.

Cultivated

The other concern was the development within capitalism of an industrial form of agriculture, a system of monoculture which impoverished the fertility of the soil, and in which agriculture was oriented not only towards the production of food but towards the profit generation.

He was also concerned that virtually all of Britain’s land was privately owned and that huge tracts of land were being used for guarded hunts – pheasants and grouse – specifically for the recreational activities of a rich and powerful ruling class.

Although people like Trotsky, and liberal scholars in general, portrayed Kropotkin as a dreamy intellectual, a utopian socialist, completely disconnected from social and political “realities”, in fact Kropotkin was a very practical and down-to-earth scholar. .

While Marx had spent his time in the library of the British Museum studying economics – mainly government reports, Kropotkin traveled widely to do empirical studies of agricultural practices, and all his life he and his wife Sophie cultivated a parcel. He even made his own furniture!

Cultural

In his little book of reflections Fields, factories and workshops tomorrow, which Colin Ward described as one of the “great prophetic works of the 19th century,” Kropotkin advocated the following:

  • That all forms of industry, whether factories or workshops, should be decentralized, and he argued for what we would now call the “greening” of city life.
  • That future agriculture must be both diversified and intensive, involving vegetable gardens, intensive field crops, irrigated meadows, orchards, greenhouse crops, as well as vegetable gardens. Thanks to these, Kropotkin argued, high yields of a variety of crops could be produced. Food self-sufficiency could be achieved, he believed, without resorting to industrial agriculture (under capitalism), if the farmer could be freed from the three “vultures” (as Kropotkin then described) – the state, the landlord. earthling and the banker. . Kropotkin thus opposed both the state collectivization of agriculture and capitalist agriculture.
  • This labor force, in both industry and agriculture, should – and could – be reduced to a few hours a day, allowing the inhabitants of a community to have sufficient time for leisure and activities. cultural.

Brutal

All of this, Kropotkin admitted, would involve a social revolution and the creation of an ecological society based on communist anarchist principles.

It should be noted that Kropotkin’s book had an important influence on many people, including for example Lev Tolstoy, Ebenezer Howard (and his advocacy for garden cities), Lewis Mumford and Paul Goodman.

The book on “Mutual Aid” is perhaps the best known of all of Kropotkin’s work and is still in press. A popular scientific work, it expressed Kropotkin’s concern at the end of the 19th century at the emergence of a school of thought known as “social Darwinism”.

What initially provoked Kropotkin was an article by Thomas Huxley, widely known as “Darwin’s Bulldog”, given his defense of Darwin’s theory., published in the journal The nineteenth century in 1888.

It was titled, The struggle for existence and its impact on man. Quoting Hobbes, Huxley specifically described life in nature – both organic nature and the social life of indigenous peoples – as “lonely, poor, wicked, brutal and short.”

Mutual aid

Following Huxley, social Darwinists – who included such ruthless American entrepreneurs as Rockefeller and Carnegie – applied Darwinian theory – particularly Herbert Spencer’s concept of “survival of the fittest” to human social life.

This concept has been used as an ideological justification to promote capitalism and imperialism, and the colonial exploitation of indigenous peoples. It also implied that humans were inherently motivated by aggressive impulses and were inherently selfish, selfish, competitive, and possessive individualists.

Kropotkin, of course, was critical of Rousseau and never doubted the existence – of the reality – of conflict, competition, and selfishness (subjective action), both in the living world and in human social life.

But he nevertheless strongly contested the Hobbesian (capitalist) worldview, arguing that it was exaggerated and completely one-sided. So he came to write a series of articles on “mutual aid”, that is, cooperative activities, mutual support and care that are expressed not only by animals, but in all human societies and throughout history.

The self-help tendency, or what he also described as “anarchy” was also clearly evident “among us” people in Western societies.

It coexisted with, and often in opposition, the state and capitalist institutions. Mutual aid (or anarchy) was expressed, according to Kropotkin, in workers’ associations, unions, family life, religious charities, various clubs and cultural societies, as well as many other forms of voluntary associations. . Mutual aid, Kropotkin stressed, was an important factor in evolution and in human social life.

Looting

Mutual aid is not an anarchist text, nor a work of political theory, but it reflects Kropotkin’s conception of a future society which he qualifies as free or anarchist communism.

This would imply the need for a social revolution and a form of politics involving the following three essential principles or principles:

  • A rejection of the state and all forms of hierarchy and oppression that inhibited the autonomy and well-being of the person as a single social being;
  • A repudiation of the capitalist market economy, with its wage system (which for Kropotkin was a form of slavery), private property, its competitive ethic and its ideology of possessive individualism;
  • And finally, a vision of a future ecological society, based on mutual aid, voluntary service, participatory forms of democracy and a form of community social organization. Such a society would promote both the fullest expression of individual freedom and would express mutualism, a cooperative relationship with the natural world.

In a time when corporate capitalism reigns triumphantly, creating conditions that induce fear, social upheaval, glaring economic inequalities, and acute ecological crisis, Kropotkin’s vision and his form of politics still hold contemporary relevance.

Unlike the supporters of the “Green New Deal” – supported by Naomi Klein et al – Kropotkin allegedly insisted that the capitalist state rather than being the solution to the ecological crisis was in fact the cause.

For, as social ecologist Murray Bookchin has long argued, capitalism in a symbiotic relationship with the state is plundering the earth in search of profit and is therefore the main cause of the “modern crisis”.

This author

Brian Morris is thmerited professor of anthropology at Goldsmiths College, and aauthor of several books on ecology and anarchism, including Kropotkin: politics from the community (Press PM 2018). “In memory of a colleague, David Graeber (1961-2020). “


Source link

]]>