Ecology – E JEMED http://e-jemed.org/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 02:03:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://e-jemed.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1-150x150.png Ecology – E JEMED http://e-jemed.org/ 32 32 Integrate social considerations at scale https://e-jemed.org/integrate-social-considerations-at-scale/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 02:03:47 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/integrate-social-considerations-at-scale/ image: Integrated framework for top-down and bottom-up approaches within socio-ecological systems based large-scale ecological restoration program and its application in the Yangtze River basin-based cropland-to-forest conversion program. see After Credit: Hua Zheng et al. The growth of ecological restoration programs around the world has made the planet greener. Meanwhile, the failure of large-scale restoration has […]]]>

image: Integrated framework for top-down and bottom-up approaches within socio-ecological systems based large-scale ecological restoration program and its application in the Yangtze River basin-based cropland-to-forest conversion program.
see After

Credit: Hua Zheng et al.

The growth of ecological restoration programs around the world has made the planet greener. Meanwhile, the failure of large-scale restoration has also been noted, due to conflicts among stakeholders during the implementation process. For effective ecological restoration, a comprehensive understanding of socio-ecological interactions during the land conversion process and the integration of the social dimension into large-scale ecological restoration planning play a key role. However, large-scale ecological restoration planning tends to pay more attention to ecological attributes (eg, slope), with social attributes often being overlooked. In addition, how social dimensions should be taken into account remains a challenge.
Recently, many researchers have attempted to analyze household-scale human behavior responses and feedbacks when implementing large-scale ecological restoration. A new study by the Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences of the Chinese Academy of Sciences offers an approach for integrating social considerations into large-scale ecological restoration planning, highlighting its importance for increasing practicality. and project profitability.
To improve ecological restoration based on top-down policies, this team has developed a new approach that integrates bottom-up approaches targeting stakeholder interests while taking into account social considerations for behavior analysis. Based on this integrated top-down and bottom-up approach, a meta-analysis was introduced to identify the main socio-economic and socio-ecological factors influencing the implementation of large-scale ecological restoration, and a stochastic model was built. to analyze the impact of socio-economic factors on the behaviors of decision-makers and large-scale participants.
This new approach was then tested under the Conversion of Cropland to Forest Program (CCFP) in the Yangtze River Basin. Evidence reveals the low effectiveness of ecological restoration planning based solely on the analysis of ecological processes. “Top-down spatial planning, such as CCFP, which emphasizes hierarchical control within government structures, has been widely applied to large-scale ecological planning. However, these approaches typically overlook more comprehensive considerations of socio-ecological interactions, leading to implementation failure and low effectiveness, according to Zhaowei Ding, the study’s lead author. “We find that current CCFP planning without socio-economic considerations has failed to achieve program objectives at scale and has shown low investment efficiency, with 19.71% of the implemented area converted. in cropland after contract expiration We applied our method to CCFP planning in the Yangtze River Basin and found that the spatial correspondence between planned and actual restoration increased from 61.55% to 81.86% when socio-economic factors were included. Additionally, compared to the current CCFP implementation, the cost-effectiveness of land-use planning with social considerations improved by 46.94 percent.”
This research demonstrates that spatial optimization planning that incorporates both top-down and bottom-up approaches can lead to more practical and efficient ecological restoration, compared to approaches that are only top-down. This integrated top-down and bottom-up prioritization method can provide scientific support to improve the practicality of spatial planning for effective management of ecological restoration in China and beyond.
This work was funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the Second Tibetan Plateau Scientific Expedition and Research Program (STEP). Co-authors from the Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences include Professor Hua Zheng, Professor Xiaodong Chen, Principal Investigator Ruonan Li, and Professor Zhiyun Ouyang. Other co-authors include Jun Wand, Principal Investigator, Land Consolidation and Rehabilitation Key Laboratory, Center for Land Consolidation and Rehabilitation, Ministry of Natural Resources; Patrick O’Connor, associate professor at the University of Adelaide; and Cong Li, professor at Xi’an Jiaotong University.


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China is building a true ecological civilization https://e-jemed.org/china-is-building-a-true-ecological-civilization/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 18:42:49 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/china-is-building-a-true-ecological-civilization/ THE 2022 United Nations Climate Change Conference of Parties (Cop27) has just ended. One of the defining themes of this year’s conference was the insistence of Southern leaders for climate justice — for rich countries to step up their financial and technological support to poorer countries, to help mitigate the effects of climate change and […]]]>

THE 2022 United Nations Climate Change Conference of Parties (Cop27) has just ended. One of the defining themes of this year’s conference was the insistence of Southern leaders for climate justice — for rich countries to step up their financial and technological support to poorer countries, to help mitigate the effects of climate change and to accelerate the transition to green energy systems.

Climate justice is not some kind of radical fringe notion; indeed, the principle of “common but differentiated responsibilities” is enshrined in international law, and reflects the fact that in 200 years, Europe, North America and Japan have burned huge amounts of fossil fuels on their way to modernization, creating an environmental crisis in the process. As agrarian sociologist Max Ajl puts it, “North Atlantic capitalism locked up the atmosphere like a dumping ground for its waste eons ago.”

no justice

However, the world has so far witnessed very little of this climate justice. At the United Nations climate summit in Copenhagen in 2009, rich countries pledged to channel $100 billion a year to less developed countries to tackle environmental problems. Even if this commitment is tiny compared to the level of investment really necessary, it has never been kept.

The United States spends over $800 billion a year on its military, but apparently it can’t afford to help solve the problems it played such an outsized role in creating (remember that the United States, with 4% of the world’s population, is responsible for 25% of historical carbon dioxide emissions).

Although China is still a developing country, the reality is that it is China rather than advanced Western countries that provides key leadership on environmental issues.

China is already working with a large number of countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America on green development projects, including Zambia, South Africa, Kenya, Argentina and Cuba.

Nigerian journalist Otiato Opali writes: “From the Sakai photovoltaic power station in the Central African Republic to the Garissa solar power station in Kenya, through the Aysha wind project in Ethiopia and the Kafue Gorge hydroelectric power station in Zambia, China has set up hundreds of clean energies. , green development projects in Africa, supporting the continent’s efforts to combat climate change.

Green development

At home, China has been actively pursuing decarbonization for more than a decade. In his address to the United Nations General Assembly in 2020, Xi Jinping announced two major goals agreed to by the Chinese government: to peak carbon dioxide emissions by 2030 and to achieve carbon neutrality by 2060.

China has repeatedly reiterated its peak carbon and neutrality goals, formulating a detailed action plan around them and incorporating them into law. At the World Economic Forum in January 2022, Xi said achieving carbon neutrality is an “intrinsic requirement of China’s high-quality development and a solemn commitment to the international community.”

China’s goals are of historical significance. Columbia University professor Adam Tooze enthused, saying that with Xi’s announcement in 2020, “the Chinese leader may have redefined the future outlook for humanity… As the impact of his remarks was felt, climate modelers crunched the numbers and concluded that, if fully implemented, the new pledge alone will reduce the projected temperature rise by 0. .2 to 0.3° C. This is the greatest favorable shock that their models have ever produced.

Over the 15-year period from 2007 to 2022, the share of coal in China’s energy mix has fallen from 81% to 56%, putting China in the same range as Australia – a wealthy and advanced country. which could and should have started its low-carbon transition decades ago.

Along with reducing its use of coal, China is rapidly becoming the top renewable energy superpower, accounting for 46% of new solar and wind power generation capacity in 2021.

International energy analyst Tim Buckley observes that China leads the world in “wind and solar installation, in wind and solar manufacturing, in electric vehicle production, in batteries, in hydropower, in nuclear, in ground-mounted heat pumps, in grid transmission and distribution, and in green hydrogen. In short, “they literally lead the world in all zero-emission technologies today.”

China has also advanced wind power domestically, with data indicating that “China now operates nearly half of the world’s installed offshore wind, with 26 gigawatts out of a total of 54 gigawatts globally. – a statistic that recently prompted Elizabeth Sawin, co-director of the US climate think tank Climate Interactive to remark: “While the US can’t quite agree to build back better, China is building just better.”

Additionally, China is making significant progress in decarbonizing transportation, with more high-speed rail miles than the rest of the world combined. Currently, 59% of Chinese city public buses are fully electric, up from 16% in 2016. About 98% of the world’s electric buses are in China.

Meanwhile, China is carrying out the largest reforestation project in the world, planting forests “the size of Ireland” in a single year and doubling forest cover from 12% in 1980 to 23% in 2020 – sadly, the global trend is in the opposite direction.

Socialism is the key

As John Bellamy Foster noted recently: “As China has taken steps to implement its radical conception of ecological civilization, which is embedded in state planning and regulation, the notion of a Green New Deal has not taken concrete form anywhere in the West.”

Scientists have long understood the challenges of climate change. The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, whose objective is to “stabilize concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system”, was adopted in 1992 and ratified by 154 countries.

And yet, little valuable progress has been made globally. Indeed, more than half of all industrial-age carbon dioxide emissions were generated in the three decades that followed.

This lack of progress seems inexcusable. Humanity has done almost nothing in the face of a global existential crisis, and the reason for this is simply that the dominant economic system in the world is capitalism. When a society is organized primarily around the pursuit of private profit, rather than meeting the long-term needs of humanity, the issue of saving the planet will never be the top priority.

China’s economic development is proceeding according to state plans, not the anarchy of the market. The interests of private profit are subordinated to the needs of society.

China’s huge investments in renewable energy, energy efficiency, electric vehicles, reforestation and circular waste management have largely been made by state-owned banks, and its projects carried out largely by public enterprises, in accordance with the strategic orientations defined by the government.

The power of example

Those in major capitalist countries should take inspiration from China’s example in dealing with the ecological crisis and nurture that inspiration into a powerful mass movement capable of effecting the meaningful change humanity so desperately needs.

Just as advances in social welfare in European socialist countries in the mid-twentieth century put enormous pressure on the capitalist ruling classes to make concessions to the working class (in the form of universal education , social housing and healthcare systems), as well as China’s environmental strategy in the 21st century is creating pressure on the capitalist ruling classes to stop destroying the planet and commit to climate justice.

China has become the undisputed leader in the fight against climate breakdown, and the results of this leadership reverberate globally. It would be difficult to overstate the profound significance of this for our species and our planet.

Carlos Martinez is cofounder of the No Cold War campaign and co-editor of Friends of Socialist China — follow him on Twitter @change agent.

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Lawmakers slam environmental authorities’ ‘duplication efforts’ as they reorganize departments https://e-jemed.org/lawmakers-slam-environmental-authorities-duplication-efforts-as-they-reorganize-departments/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 06:56:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/lawmakers-slam-environmental-authorities-duplication-efforts-as-they-reorganize-departments/ Lawmakers questioned whether the reorganization of the Environment and Ecology Bureau (EEB) and the Environmental Protection Department (EPD) would clarify officers’ responsibilities, as the creation of seven direction was proposed. The Establishment Sub-Committee today announced the approval of the proposed structural reorganization of the EPD and the Environment branch of the EEB, saying […]]]>

Lawmakers questioned whether the reorganization of the Environment and Ecology Bureau (EEB) and the Environmental Protection Department (EPD) would clarify officers’ responsibilities, as the creation of seven direction was proposed.

The Establishment Sub-Committee today announced the approval of the proposed structural reorganization of the EPD and the Environment branch of the EEB, saying it is necessary to cope with the increasing complexity of the work during the expansion of power and authority over the past 10 years.

According to the proposal, the Environment Directorate will appoint a position for climate change officers and create a deputy director, two deputy directors and a senior environmental protection officer at EPD.

“The reorganization will focus on clarifying the previous garbage collection work of the Food and Environmental Hygiene Department (FEHD) and transferring it to the EPD,” said Tse Chin-wan, secretary of environment and health. ecology.

However, the reorganization drew criticism from lawmakers in the Legislative Council on Wednesday.

Legislator Kitson Yang Wing-kit said the garbage collection work should be fully delegated to the FEHD rather than creating new positions within the EPD to share the workload, which would instead create self-help efforts. overlap.

Lawmaker Gary Zhang Xinyu argued that the position of climate change officer overlaps with that of environment and ecology secretary.

“Is it necessary to find a person with a high salary to help another person with a high salary to do the same job? he asked.

The former government raised the structural reorganization proposal but withdrew it at a Legislative Council meeting in June this year after lawmakers failed to reach an agreement.

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Avian researcher is the next guest speaker https://e-jemed.org/avian-researcher-is-the-next-guest-speaker/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 16:27:25 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/avian-researcher-is-the-next-guest-speaker/ Pierre Hodum Photo of Sy bean Avian ecologist and conservation biologist Peter Hodum will be the guest speaker at the “Future of the Oceans” conference at 3 p.m. on Sunday, November 20 at the Fort Worden State Park Chapel. The Ocean Series is presented by the Port Townsend Marine Science Center. Hodum will lecture “Of […]]]>

Avian ecologist and conservation biologist Peter Hodum will be the guest speaker at the “Future of the Oceans” conference at 3 p.m. on Sunday, November 20 at the Fort Worden State Park Chapel.

The Ocean Series is presented by the Port Townsend Marine Science Center.

Hodum will lecture “Of Puffins and Petrels: Conserving Seabirds of the Salish Sea and Outer Washington Coast”. His presentation will relate collaborative research focused on improving understanding of the ecology and conservation status of species such as Tufted Puffin, Rhinoceros Auklet, Cassin’s Auklet, and Leach’s Storm-Petrel and the fork-tailed petrel.

“Although Washington is blessed with a rich community of breeding and wintering seabirds, relatively little is known about the ecology and conservation status of many species,” Hodum said. “This relative lack of knowledge extends to iconic species such as the tufted puffin, a species listed as endangered by Washington State.”

Hodum is a professor of biology and director of environmental policy and decision-making at the University of Puget Sound. He has a particular interest in conservation-based research, including the impacts of anthropogenic threats such as marine plastic debris, habitat alteration and loss, introduced species, and fisheries interactions on populations. birds and island ecosystems.

In the Pacific Northwest, Hodum studies the ecology, population dynamics and conservation status of burrowing seabirds, primarily Rhinoceros Auklets and Tufted Puffins.

Since its inception in 2014, the Port Townsend Marine Science Center’s Future of the Oceans Lecture Series has explored the frontiers of ocean research and emerging technologies while confronting the human capacity to understand and maintain ocean health. . Each year, participants are challenged and informed with thought-provoking presentations. The series is made possible by the support of the Darrow family.

Participation is free, although donations are welcome.

For more information on the lecture series, visit ptmsc.org.

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New Zealand offshore wind project receives development boost from RPS https://e-jemed.org/new-zealand-offshore-wind-project-receives-development-boost-from-rps/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 11:36:39 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/new-zealand-offshore-wind-project-receives-development-boost-from-rps/ RPS has announced that it will work with Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners (CIP) and the New Zealand Superannuation Fund (NZ Super Fund) on the first phase of a potential offshore wind farm development off the coast of New Zealand. CIP and NZ Super Fund joined forces earlier this year to bring offshore wind to South Taranaki […]]]>

RPS has announced that it will work with Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners (CIP) and the New Zealand Superannuation Fund (NZ Super Fund) on the first phase of a potential offshore wind farm development off the coast of New Zealand.

CIP and NZ Super Fund joined forces earlier this year to bring offshore wind to South Taranaki and support New Zealand’s renewable energy goals. The consortium has identified a potential site for an offshore wind farm in the South Taranaki Bight.

RPS will use its extensive global offshore wind expertise and in-country knowledge to design the study program, the company said.

We will develop a marine ecology survey program that will include a review of existing data and knowledge of the region to identify potential gaps and species/habitats that may be at risk of impacts from offshore wind development,” said Tamara Al-Hashimiproject manager at RPS.

Al-Hashimi added that RPS will examine the distribution and seasonality of marine mammals, seabirds and shorebirds, fish, invertebrates, and benthic habitats and communities in the proposed project area and surrounding region.

“At this early stage, it is important to work closely with local iwi and key stakeholders. We want to collaborate effectively so that we can design and develop the marine ecology studies needed to undertake environmental assessments and inform the approval of an offshore wind farm, Al-Hashimi said.

In September, CIP and NZ Super Fund launched a study into the future industry requirements needed to support the development and operation of the 1 GW South Taranaki offshore wind project.

The offshore wind farm could have around 70 wind turbines, installed some 37 kilometers off the south coast of Taranaki.

In June, the developers submitted a pre-activity notice to the New Zealand Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) to deploy a Floating Detection and Ranging Device (FLiDAR) at the project site.

A planned initial 1GW development would represent more than 11% of New Zealand’s current electricity demand capacity and could power more than 650,000 homes.

The partners believe the project could then expand to 2 GW, helping to meet the projected strong growth in electricity demand in New Zealand.

Follow offshoreWIND.biz on:

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University of Zurich: A Unique Academic Program – India Education | Latest Education News | World Education News https://e-jemed.org/university-of-zurich-a-unique-academic-program-india-education-latest-education-news-world-education-news/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 06:20:04 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/university-of-zurich-a-unique-academic-program-india-education-latest-education-news-world-education-news/ Along with climate change, biodiversity loss is one of the most pressing environmental issues facing the world today. Up to one million animal and plant species will be on the brink of extinction over the next few decades. These losses endanger lakes, forests and many other ecosystems and, in the long run, threaten the very […]]]>

Along with climate change, biodiversity loss is one of the most pressing environmental issues facing the world today. Up to one million animal and plant species will be on the brink of extinction over the next few decades. These losses endanger lakes, forests and many other ecosystems and, in the long run, threaten the very foundation of human existence.

A thorough understanding of ecological and evolutionary processes is therefore necessary if we are to mitigate negative environmental effects. “In our new study program, students learn about the latest concepts in ecology, evolutionary and behavioral biology and environmental science,” explains Florian Altermatt, professor of aquatic ecology and co-director of the new study program.

Students gain an in-depth understanding of biodiversity and discover the scientific tools needed to independently explore relevant processes and functions. The new degree program, which was recently approved by the University’s Board of Trustees, will be available from the fall 2023 semester and will culminate in a bachelor’s or master’s degree.

Meeting a social need
“With the new biodiversity study program, UZH responds to current social needs and offers a unique and tailor-made study program. It establishes a link between the loss of species and the climatic changes occurring on the surface of the Earth, says Michael Schaepman, president of the UZH. The university thus makes use of its considerable expertise in ecology, evolutionary biology and environmental sciences; UZH conducts world-class experimental research in this area, and its two URPPs Evolution in Action: From Genomes to Ecosystems and Global Change and Biodiversity are international in scope. UZH’s extensive research and teaching activities in relevant fields have been brought together to create a rich and varied academic program.

Student request
The idea for the new degree program can be attributed to the reform of the minor subject in environmental sciences, which began in 2017. Analyzes of existing programs and a review of student feedback revealed that it there was demand and potential for a stand-alone biodiversity-focused curriculum. In the spring of 2021, the leadership of the Department of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies (IEU) decided to accelerate its planning. In-depth discussions among faculty followed and workshops were held.

In addition to the IEU, four other UZH departments of the Faculty of Sciences (MNF) are concerned. The program coordinators, led by Florian Altermatt and population ecology professor Arpat Ozgul, began working out the details with Claudia Hegglin and Karin Isler, and they developed the unique new study program in a large-scale process. ladder. “The degree course is unique in the field of biodiversity in the German-speaking world,” says Florian Altermatt.

Diversity of career prospects
The first two years of the program focus on basic natural science knowledge and provide insight into organic biodiversity. In the third year, students are required to complete a professional internship and present a license thesis. The program can be taken as a single major or combined with a minor subject, for example in the fields of political science, business and economics or communication studies. This wide range of possible combinations offers students a broad and interdisciplinary education in line with their interests. Students with a bachelor’s degree in biodiversity can continue their biodiversity studies at the master’s level.

The new curriculum enables students to take on professional roles in academia as well as other areas of society, including administration, nature conservation, the private sector or politics. Future biodiversity graduates can also pursue an upper secondary education diploma in biology. The new curriculum generated a lot of interest during information days for prospective students in September 2021, program officials said. They expect about 80 students in the first cohort, starting next fall.

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Marine ecology for college students https://e-jemed.org/marine-ecology-for-college-students/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 11:15:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/marine-ecology-for-college-students/ Local middle schoolers are invited to the Darling Marine Center at the University of Maine at Walpole to explore the ecology of the Damariscotta River estuary. This Saturday morning educational program designed for middle schoolers will be led by Devin Guilfoyle, Outreach Coordinator at the Darling Marine Center. Guilfoyle will lead a two-hour exploration of […]]]>

Local middle schoolers are invited to the Darling Marine Center at the University of Maine at Walpole to explore the ecology of the Damariscotta River estuary. This Saturday morning educational program designed for middle schoolers will be led by Devin Guilfoyle, Outreach Coordinator at the Darling Marine Center.

Guilfoyle will lead a two-hour exploration of marine life around campus beginning at 1 p.m. on Nov. 19. Participants will visit the rocky intertidal zone, salt marsh and mud flats of Lowes Cove. Content will explore tides, tidal zonation, salt marsh formation, and hands-on exploration of organisms that live in Gulf of Maine ecosystems. A campus tour will be available for adults who transport program participants, if interested.

“We want to explore DMC’s coastal ecosystems with area students and provide more opportunities for learners of all ages to connect to the ocean through our campus,” said Heather Leslie, director and professor at Darling Marine Center. .

This program is funded by generous local donors through donations to the Darling Marine Center.

Interested students in grades 5-8 should apply by completing the form by November 17 at dmc.umaine.edu. Participants should be prepared to traverse rough, slippery and muddy terrain along the shoreline and on the DMC trail network. Please contact Guilfoyle with any questions at devin.guilfoyle@maine.edu.

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I’m a celebrity campmate ‘ready for a cockroach and spider infestation’ in Australia amid storm chaos https://e-jemed.org/im-a-celebrity-campmate-ready-for-a-cockroach-and-spider-infestation-in-australia-amid-storm-chaos/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 23:01:44 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/im-a-celebrity-campmate-ready-for-a-cockroach-and-spider-infestation-in-australia-amid-storm-chaos/ “The big one is the mosquitoes! I’m a celebrity campmate ready to deal with a ‘cockroach and spider infestation’ as rat numbers also surge in Australia amid storm chaos Ecology experts have admitted seeing a ‘massive increase’ in cockroaches in Australia amid the chaos of the ongoing storm One has warned that ‘mosquitoes’ are the […]]]>

“The big one is the mosquitoes! I’m a celebrity campmate ready to deal with a ‘cockroach and spider infestation’ as rat numbers also surge in Australia amid storm chaos

  • Ecology experts have admitted seeing a ‘massive increase’ in cockroaches in Australia amid the chaos of the ongoing storm
  • One has warned that ‘mosquitoes’ are the main concern in the summer Down Under, which starts in December and ends in February
  • Others have reported that rats and spiders have increased in number
  • ITV declined to comment when contacted by MailOnline

The insects thrive in moist and humid conditions, which helps to increase the number of spawners.

And according to multiple reports, the I’m a Celebrity campmates are set to deal with an infestation of cockroaches and spiders, while rat numbers have also spiked in Australia amid the chaos of the ongoing storm.

Environmental experts have admitted seeing a ‘massive increase’ in cockroaches, while one warned ‘mosquitoes’ are the main concern in the summer Down Under, which starts in December and ends in February .

Yikes: Reports say I’m a Celebrity campmates are set to deal with an infestation of cockroaches and spiders, while rat numbers have also spiked in Australia amid ongoing storm chaos

According The mirroran Australian headline this week described an “explosion” of cockroaches with others warning that rats and spiders have increased in number.

Professor Dieter Hochuli, who leads the University of Sydney’s Integrative Ecology Group, told the publication: ‘The big issue that is causing a lot of concern for this coming summer is mosquitoes.

“Their biology is dependent on available water and higher temperatures mean they will be able to reproduce quickly once the weather warms up.

“The public health risks are significant and it will be an important summer to cover up and wear repellent. This moist environment really helps insects deal with one of the biggest threats that is drying out.

Oh dear!  Experts admitted seeing a 'massive increase' in cockroaches, while one warned 'mosquitoes' were the main concern (pictured: Vernon Kay in 2020)

Oh dear! Experts admitted seeing a ‘massive increase’ in cockroaches, while one warned ‘mosquitoes’ were the main concern (pictured: Vernon Kay in 2020)

Meanwhile, during an appearance on Channel Nine News, Pest2Kill director Julian Bracewell said: ‘We have seen a massive increase in cockroaches. I think we are heading into new territory because we have never had so much rain.

‘The presence of La Nina here creates quite a fertile environment. It is because of this that we have seen an increase in insect farming.

ITV declined to comment when contacted by MailOnline.

Cruel?  In 2019, I'm A Celebrity came under fire from viewers after dozens of cockroaches were crushed to death during the show's Bushtucker trial.

Cruel? In 2019, I’m A Celebrity came under fire from viewers after dozens of cockroaches were crushed to death during the show’s Bushtucker trial.

In 2019, I Am A Celebrity came under fire from viewers after dozens of cockroaches were crushed to death during the show’s Bushtucker trial.

Viewers slammed the ITV show after comedian Andrew Maxwell was left with insect remains stuck to his hands, neck and face.

Charities, meanwhile, called the show’s animal exploitation ‘tired, sticky and moronic’ and said there would be ‘mass public outcry and disgust’ if the harmed animals had been cute or domesticated.

An IAC spokesperson told MailOnline at the time: ‘As a production, I’m A Celebrity complies with all regional and national laws regarding the use of insects, animals and reptiles.

“We keep the RSPCA NSW informed of all our activities at the show and they have an open invitation to visit the site at any time.

“At each of the Bushtucker trials that feature animals or insects, we have qualified and experienced animal handlers on site.”

Shocked: Viewers were disgusted after watching Andrew with hundreds and hundreds of cockroaches poured into a giant plexiglass helmet

Shocked: Viewers were disgusted after watching Andrew with hundreds and hundreds of cockroaches poured into a giant plexiglass helmet

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PFAS Update: October 2022 State-by-State Groundwater Regulations https://e-jemed.org/pfas-update-october-2022-state-by-state-groundwater-regulations/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 10:07:14 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/pfas-update-october-2022-state-by-state-groundwater-regulations/ In the absence of federal cleanup standards for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (“PFAS”) in groundwater, many states have themselves begun the process of regulating PFAS in groundwater. As a result, states have adopted a patchwork of regulations and guidance standards that present significant compliance challenges for affected industries. This Customer Alert explores the current landscape […]]]>

In the absence of federal cleanup standards for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (“PFAS”) in groundwater, many states have themselves begun the process of regulating PFAS in groundwater. As a result, states have adopted a patchwork of regulations and guidance standards that present significant compliance challenges for affected industries. This Customer Alert explores the current landscape of state regulations regarding guidance, notification, and cleanup levels of PFAS—typically perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (“PFOS”) and perfluorooctanoic acid (“PFOA”)—in waters. underground.

I. Federal Health Recommendations and Advisories

Although no legally binding standards for groundwater have been published at the federal level, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) has published an influential document: Interim recommendations for treating groundwater contaminated with PFOA and PFOS. The key details are:

  • Date: Implemented on December 19, 2019.
  • Applicability of the site: All locations that are currently undergoing federal cleanup actions.
  • Recommendations:
    • Apply a screening level of 40 ppt for PFOA and PFOS, individually or combined, to determine if the compounds are present at a site and may warrant further action.
    • Apply the EPA’s 2016 Drinking Water Health Advisory of 70 ppt for PFOA and PFOS, individually or in combination, (“HA”) as a preliminary remediation target for contaminated groundwater that are a current or potential source of drinking water.

Although the HA is not legally enforceable, several states have nevertheless used the 70 ppt recommended by the EPA as a benchmark for establishing groundwater limits.

II. State regulations

The snapshot provided below is current to October 20, 2022 but it is important to note that this is a rapidly evolving regulatory space. Some states, like Illinois, North Carolinaand Rhode Islandhave proposed new or revised groundwater regulations for various PFAS substances that may come into force soon.

Companies should determine if they currently use or release PFAS compounds and, if so, assess whether national regulations apply, particularly if they operate in one of the jurisdictions listed below. In addition, owners of properties using legacy PFAS and potential purchasers of commercial and industrial properties should review the latest groundwater quality standards as part of the due diligence process.

States

Concentration level

Settlement type

Information

Iowa

0.004 ppt for protected groundwater sources (listed by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources at 0.000000004 mg/L)

PFOA (Advice)

National standards

Iowa

0.02 ppt for protected groundwater sources (listed by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources as 0.00000002 mg/L)

PFOS (council)

National standards

Illinois

2 ppt (declared by the Illinois Pollution Control Agency as 2 ng/L)

PFOA (orientation)

Regulation and Related Information

New Jersey

2 ppt (indicated by regulation as 0.002 µg/L)

Chloroperfluoropolyether carbonates (Clean Up)

Regulation and Related Information

Michigan

6 points

PFNA (cleaning)

Regulation and Related Information

Michigan

8 points

PFOA (cleaning)

Regulation and Related Information

Washington

9 ppt (declared by the Washington Department of Ecology as 9 ng/L)

PFNA (Orientation)

Related Information

Washington

10 ppt (declared by the Washington Department of Ecology as 10 ng/L)

PFOA (orientation)

Related Information

New Hampshire

11 dots

PFNA (cleaning)

Regulation and Related Information

New Hampshire

12 dots

PFOA (cleaning)

Regulation and Related Information

New Jersey

13 dots

PFNA and PFOS (cleaning)

Regulation and Related Information

Illinois

14 ppt (reported by the Illinois Pollution Control Agency as 14 ng/L)

PFOS (orientation)

Regulation and Related Information

New Jersey

14 dots

PFOA (cleaning)

Regulation and Related Information

New Hampshire

15 dots

PFOS (cleaning)

Regulation and Related Information

Washington

15 ppt (declared by the Washington Department of Ecology as 15 ng/L)

PFOS (orientation)

Related Information

Minnesota

15 ppt (reported by the Minnesota Department of Health as 0.015 ppb)

PFOS (orientation)

Health board level

Michigan

16 dots

PFOS (cleaning)

Regulation and Related Information

New Hampshire

18 dots

PFHxS (cleaning)

Regulation and Related Information

Massachusetts

20 ppt (listed in the regulations as 0.02 ppb)

6 PFAS substances combined: PFOA, PFOS, PFHxS, PFNA, PFHpA and PFDA (Clean Up)

Regulation and Related Information

Vermont

20 ppt (listed in the regulations as 0.02 µg/L)

5 PFAS substances combined: PFHpA, PFHxS, PFNA, PFOS and PFOA (Notification)

Regulation and Related Information

Illinois

21 ppt (reported by the Illinois Pollution Control Agency as 21 ng/L)

PFNA (Orientation)

Regulation and Related Information

Iowa

21 ppt for protected groundwater sources (listed by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources as 0.000021 mg/L)

PFNA Notice)

National standards

Washington

24 ppt (declared by the Washington Department of Ecology as 24 ng/L)

HFPO-DA or GenX (orientation)

Related Information

Minnesota

35 dots

PFOA (Advice)

Health board level (see page 181)

Hawaii

40 points, etc

PFOA and PFOS; 16 other PFAS substances (advisory)

Environmental Response Levels (see page 44)

Minnesota

47 dots

PFHxS (Council)

Health board level (see page 180)

Michigan

51 dots

PFHxS (cleaning)

Regulation and Related Information

Washington

65 ppt (declared by the Washington Department of Ecology as 65 ng/L)

PFHxS (Guide)

Related Information

Colorado

70 dots

Site Specific Standard for PFOA and PFOS (Cleanup)

Site-specific groundwater quality standard

Florida, Maine, Montana, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island

70 dots

Follow EPA Health Advisory Level: PFOS and PFOA Combined (Guidance and Notification)

Note: Maine has residential and building standards

Florida: Orientation plan

Maine: Maximum exposure guideline (see pages 36 and 60)

Note: Maine contains PFOS + PFOA + PFHpA + PFNA + PFHxS < 70 dots

Montana: Numerical water quality standard

Pennsylvania: Medium Specific Concentration Cleaning Standards

Rhode Island: Notification standard

Illinois

140 ppt (declared by the Illinois Pollution Control Agency as 140 ng/L)

PFHxS (Guide)

Regulation and Related Information

Iowa

140 ppt for protected groundwater sources (quoted by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources at 0.00014 mg/L)

PFHxS (Council)

National standards

Texas

290 points, etc

16 different PFAS substances (cleaning)

Protective concentration levels (see March 2022 Level 1 PCL chart)

Washington

345 ppt (declared by the Washington Department of Ecology as 345 ng/L)

PFBS (orientation)

Related Information

Michigan

370 dots

HFPO-DA (cleaning)

Regulation and Related Information

Alaska

400 ppt (listed in the regulations as 0.4 µg/L)

PFOA and PFOS separately (cleaning)

Rules (18 AAC 25) and Related Information

Michigan

420 dots

PFBS (cleaning)

Regulation and Related Information

Nevada

667 ppt (listed in the regulations as 0.667 µg/L)

PFOS and PFOA (guidelines)

Basic comparison levels

North Carolina

2,000 points

PFOA (orientation)

Regulation and Related Information

Minnesota

2,000 points

PFBS (Council)

Health board level (see page 180)

Iowa

2,000 ppt for protected groundwater sources (listed by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources as 0.02 mg/L)

PFBS (Council)

National standards

Illinois

2100 ppt (reported by the Illinois Pollution Control Agency as 2100 ng/L)

PFBS (orientation)

Regulation and Related Information

Minnesota

7,000 stitches

PFBA (Council)

Health board level (see page 180)

Pennsylvania

10,000 ppt (indicated in the regulations as 10 µg/L)

PFBS residential property (cleaning)

Medium-specific concentration standards and Related Information

Pennsylvania

29,000 ppt (listed in the regulations as 29 µg/L)

PFBS non-residential property (cleaning)

Medium-specific concentration standards and Related Information

Michigan

400,000 ppt

PFHxA (cleaning)

Regulation and Related Information

Maine

400,000 ppt (listed in the regulations as 400 ppb)

PFBS (orientation)

Note: Maine has residential and building standards

Maximum exposure guideline (see page 60)

Indiana

400,000 ppt (indicated in the regulations as 400 µg/L)

PFBS (orientation)

Screening levels

Illinois

560,000 ppt (reported by the Illinois Pollution Control Agency as 560,000 ng/L)

PFHxA (Guide)

Regulation and Related Information

Nevada

667,000 ppt (listed in the regulations as 667 µg/L)

PFBS (orientation)

Basic comparison levels

No PFAS groundwater regulations (as of publication date):

Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Idaho, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Ohio, South Carolina , South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming

Key:

Notification

A company representative should notify the appropriate government official that the ground water is above the stated limit.

Tips

These levels are not binding limits, but they can serve as a basis for regulatory action and are a useful tool for due diligence and risk assessment.

To clean

Investigation and corrective action is generally required when concentration levels exceed the cleanup threshold. This is usually expressed by groundwater quality standards which identify specific cleanup criteria.

III. Further information

Without federal PFAS standards for groundwater, states have adopted a wide range of regulatory concentration levels. For example, for PFAS substances in groundwater, the most stringent concentration is 0.004 ppt (Iowa; PFOA only) and the most lenient concentration is 667,000 ppt (Nevada; PFBS only). The following table illustrates the differences in concentration levels only for PFOA and/or PFOS.

IV. Conclusion

Companies operating in the 20 states where groundwater regulations have already been enacted should determine if they currently use or discharge any of the regulated PFAS compounds. In addition, owners of properties using legacy PFASs and potential purchasers of commercial and industrial properties in these jurisdictions will increasingly need to incorporate groundwater quality standards as part of their due diligence processes.

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China’s Ministry of Ecology and Environment releases pollutants https://e-jemed.org/chinas-ministry-of-ecology-and-environment-releases-pollutants/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 22:40:46 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/chinas-ministry-of-ecology-and-environment-releases-pollutants/ Related practices and jurisdictions We have been surveillance the progress that the Chinese Ministry of Ecology and Environment (MEE) has made on the targets set in its New action plan for the control of pollutants, published in May 2022. One of the objectives of the plan was to publish a list of major “emerging pollutants” […]]]>

We have been surveillance the progress that the Chinese Ministry of Ecology and Environment (MEE) has made on the targets set in its New action plan for the control of pollutants, published in May 2022. One of the objectives of the plan was to publish a list of major “emerging pollutants” for regulation and control, the categories of which would include persistent organic pollutants; endocrine disruptors; antibiotics; and microplastics, in 2022.

Most recently, the MEE published a draft list new key pollutants and is seeking public comment on the list by October 28, 2022. Instructions for making a public comment are available in the To remark. The full list can be found here in Mandarin and here In English.

Although the list is not definitive, it appears to cover several chemicals that are already subject to international conventions (including the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants), phased out, restricted or heavily regulated in the United States, the United Kingdom UK, Japan, Korea and/or Europe. These include PFOA, PFOS, PFHxS, decabromodiphenyl ether, dicofol, etc. The draft list also considers the main control measures that can be implemented for each of these chemicals. These control measures range from a total ban on production and use; to require import or export notices; upon cessation of import or export; strict application of discharge limits; regular self-monitoring and reporting to environmental control offices.

As discussed in our previous postonce the final list is released, following the public comment period, the Plan then directs MOEE to begin collecting key industry information from companies that produce, process, use or release priority chemicals.

Ultimately, these recent concrete steps indicate that China is indeed more focused on strengthening its pollutant monitoring framework. Other measures referenced in the plan that MOEE has implemented include proposals to protect the Yellow and Yangtze Rivers, both of which were released in early and late August.

© Copyright 2022 Squire Patton Boggs (USA) LLPNational Law Review, Volume XII, Number 294

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