Ecological holiday home / POLYGOON Architectuur

Ecological holiday home / POLYGOON Architectuur

© Jessy van der Werff

© Jessy van der Werff© Jessy van der Werff© Jessy van der Werff© Jessy van der Werff+ 38

© Jessy van der Werff
© Jessy van der Werff

Text description provided by the architects. This remarkable house is located in an area designated for weekend residences. The goal was to build a holiday home that would blend in as much as possible with the forest environment. To limit the impact on the natural environment, the construction rests on 11 narrow posts. The building thus floats about half a meter above the ground and can be moved in its entirety. Eventually, another terrace could be created on two additional posts.

© Jessy van der Werff
© Jessy van der Werff
© Jessy van der Werff
© Jessy van der Werff

The requirements were strict: the floor space was limited to only 65 m² and the upper floor had to be considerably smaller than the ground floor. Still, the client didn’t want to compromise on the feeling of space. This wish was granted thanks to three surprising interventions. First, the pentagonal floor plan (with three obtuse corners) gives an organic, soft feel to the space. This feeling is accentuated by the circulation looping around the central bathroom and the many views. In addition, the single-pitched roof provides a height of 7 meters at the rear of the volume, and also more usable space on the mezzanine. Finally, drawing a video to the roof ridge, daylight enters the interior.

Ground floor Plan
Ground floor Plan

The house itself is built 100% according to green building principles, with renewable materials. The wooden frame was prepared by the carpenter and the modules were assembled in 5 days. The client also carried out a good part of the work himself, such as the insulation, exterior cladding and interior finishes. The exterior of the timber frame was clad with debarked boards (larch trunks) over fiberboard, which provides an exterior system open to moisture. Inside, OSB panels were installed to be airtight.

© Jessy van der Werff
© Jessy van der Werff

Local softwood was the overall choice: economical, easily renewable, and the client could further reduce costs by bringing in their own skills and labor. The windows are also in wooden frames. The roof is made of wood fiber panels topped with fiber cement sheets. The underside of the floor frame is finished with concrete form plywood and the floor has been insulated in the same way as the roof and walls, with fiberboard. The client intentionally applied circular building principles. Thus, the kitchen and the bathroom have been fitted out with recycled materials.

© Jessy van der Werff
© Jessy van der Werff
© Jessy van der Werff
© Jessy van der Werff

The whole house is relocatable, recyclable and biodegradable. The technical systems are not left out either. Advanced insulation reduces heating costs: a wood stove is enough to heat the whole house. An innovative air-source heat pump was also installed to heat sanitary water in an energy-efficient and environmentally friendly way by drawing energy from the air.

© Jessy van der Werff
© Jessy van der Werff

This compact house with a living area of ​​70 m² is big, both in ambition and in space. It demonstrates that green, circular and small-scale construction can go hand in hand with comfort and the smart use of space – and a fantastic view from the bathtub.

© Jessy van der Werff
© Jessy van der Werff

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