covid pandemic – E JEMED http://e-jemed.org/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 18:14:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://e-jemed.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1-150x150.png covid pandemic – E JEMED http://e-jemed.org/ 32 32 Planned retirement for teachers | North Bay Gem https://e-jemed.org/planned-retirement-for-teachers-north-bay-gem/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 18:14:18 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/planned-retirement-for-teachers-north-bay-gem/ Content of the article A North Bay nurse practitioner wants teachers to know they haven’t been forgotten during the COVID-19 pandemic. Content of the article “The teachers have shown incredible resilience in the face of constant change, but the prolonged stress takes its toll,” Shannon Clausen, organizer of Burnout Bootcamp Retreats. Clausen said recent news […]]]>

Content of the article

A North Bay nurse practitioner wants teachers to know they haven’t been forgotten during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Content of the article

“The teachers have shown incredible resilience in the face of constant change, but the prolonged stress takes its toll, Shannon Clausen, organizer of Burnout Bootcamp Retreats.

Clausen said recent news reports indicate some school boards have seen requests for sick leave longer than three months double since 2019.

To combat this, she says, she is planning a retreat for teachers at the Canadian Ecology Center on April 2.

The bootcamp will include a full day of workshops “designed specifically to help educators learn about burnout and the stress cycle while providing activities to help them recover.”

Workshops will include yoga and a special session with Nicky Poulin of Ohana Wellness, forest bathing with Samantha, a certified forest therapy facilitator, mindfulness, hikes and campfires.

There will also be creative sessions including art with Brenda, narrative therapy with Shannon, and a special dance/movement session called TranscenDance with Benjamin Blackett from Rhode Island.

Lora McMeekin, an IPA who was one of the participants in Rippling Wellness’ first Burnout Bootcamp for healthcare workers in October 2021, said the retreat “was all I didn’t know was missing in my life at the most stressful time of my life.

“Connecting to nature was so liberating. It was the perfect mix of structure and free time.

Clausen says teachers “have not been forgotten.

“Teachers and healthcare workers were burning out long before this pandemic, so you can only imagine how much worse it is now.”

The retreat was planned for one day to provide flexibility of choice for local and out-of-town teachers.

Tickets can be purchased on Eventbrite at www.eventbrite.ca/e/265155295627

On the web: www.ripplingwellness.com

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[Shang-Jin Wei] Understanding China from Nixon https://e-jemed.org/shang-jin-wei-understanding-china-from-nixon/ Sun, 20 Feb 2022 20:30:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/shang-jin-wei-understanding-china-from-nixon/ On February 21, 1972, Richard Nixon became the first U.S. President to visit the People’s Republic of China, setting in motion a process that would end China’s decades-long isolation and jump-start the emergence of a modern economy and dynamic. But, despite the seismic economic changes in China over the ensuing half-century, many Westerners see today’s […]]]>
On February 21, 1972, Richard Nixon became the first U.S. President to visit the People’s Republic of China, setting in motion a process that would end China’s decades-long isolation and jump-start the emergence of a modern economy and dynamic. But, despite the seismic economic changes in China over the ensuing half-century, many Westerners see today’s People’s Republic as an unreformed communist country whose unfair trade practices harm Western workers and consumers. While this impression is partly a byproduct of current geopolitical competition, it also reflects a lack of historical perspective.

At the time of Nixon’s visit, China was as isolated and closed off from the world as North Korea is today. Ordinary Chinese did not have the freedom to choose where to work and had to accept jobs assigned by their local government. Almost all Chinese adults worked for the state or in a state-owned company, as no private domestic companies or foreign companies operated in the country. Nixon’s entourage also noticed a startling lack of color on the streets, as most Chinese wore blue or green. There was not a single foreign brand on the streets of Beijing or Shanghai.

Today, Chinese people can choose where they work, more than 80% of the workforce is employed by non-state-owned companies, and wages are determined by supply and demand on the work market. An international tourist cannot tell from people’s clothes alone whether he is in Shanghai, Seoul, Tokyo or Taipei. Virtually every major global brand that can be seen in New York, London, and Singapore is also ubiquitous in major Chinese cities.

Apple, Boeing, Caterpillar, Starbucks and many other foreign companies are currently doing good business in China, supporting the returns of US pension funds and mutual funds investing there. General Motors sells more cars in China than in America or any other market. And Chinese companies wholly or majority-owned by foreign investors account for 40% of Chinese exports.

At the time of Nixon’s visit, the Chinese government’s most important border control policy – as in East Germany then or North Korea now – was to prevent ordinary Chinese from fleeing the country. for real. In 2019, the last year before the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, 150 million Chinese tourists visited the United States, Europe, Southeast Asia and other regions, and returned home. them voluntarily. The personal freedom enjoyed by ordinary Chinese people today was unimaginable in 1972.

China’s transformation has not resulted in Milton Friedman’s type of capitalism, in which the state plays a minimal role in the economy. But China has adopted many regulatory institutions similar to those of Germany, Japan and even the United States. The Chinese Food and Drug Administration, created in 1998, is partly inspired by its American counterpart. And the design of its State Environmental Protection Administration (now called the Department of Ecology and Environment) was influenced by that of the US Environmental Protection Agency.

Even China’s much-criticized industrial policy drew intellectual inspiration from Alexander Hamilton, who pioneered the concept. The China 2025 program, which aims to promote what the Chinese government sees as the industries of the future, resembles less Soviet central planning than the German Industry 4.0 initiative or even the many American industrial policies.

So, was Nixon right to help China reconnect with the world? To the extent that his visit and subsequent U.S. policies contributed to China’s success in lifting a billion people out of abject poverty, it is hard to think of any other initiative that could have done more to promote well-being. To be human.

Of course, that was not the motivation for Nixon’s diplomatic coup, which strengthened America’s hand in its fight against the Soviet Union. But equally important – but often overlooked – is that American households and businesses have benefited enormously from China’s economic boom.

US exports to China have grown faster than US exports to Europe, Japan, Mexico, Canada, Brazil or Australia over the past three decades. While imports from China appear to have contributed to a decline in manufacturing jobs in the United States, employment and value added in modern American service sectors have grown faster, as low-priced Chinese goods such as laptop computers and electrical equipment boosted efficiency. Cheaper Chinese goods undoubtedly helped keep commodity prices low in Western economies from the 1980s until recently. And throughout the period of America’s increased economic engagement with China, there has been no secular rise in unemployment in the United States.

Former US President Donald Trump’s misguided trade war with China implies a reversal of these trends. By raising tariffs on Chinese imports to the level that prevailed under the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act before World War II, Trump ensured that American households and businesses faced higher prices than they did. would have done otherwise. The US trade deficit has widened rather than narrowed, in part because US companies are losing competitiveness in the global market due to the trade war.

As US policymakers are tempted, for geopolitical reasons, to end the policy of economic engagement with China pursued by successive administrations in the decades following Nixon’s visit in 1972, the risks are significant. The American standard of living would probably increase more slowly. As Chinese economic growth would suffer, support for American institutions and ideals among many ordinary Chinese could also decline. If a US decoupling strategy were to accelerate China’s strategic rapprochement with Russia, perhaps even culminating in a formal alliance, a combination of Russia’s nuclear arsenal and China’s powerful economy could present a more nightmarish challenge to the American global hegemony.

Fifty years after Nixon’s historic visit, China-US relations are at a historic nadir. Although finding common ground with China seems difficult in the current geopolitical environment, the logic that China’s engagement in the world can enhance Chinese people’s personal freedom and also bring benefits to American households and businesses remains truer than ever.

Shang Jin Wei
Shang-Jin Wei, a former chief economist at the Asian Development Bank, is a professor of finance and economics at Columbia Business School and Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. — Ed.

(Project Syndicate)

By Korea Herald (khnews@heraldcorp.com)

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Study finds antigenic profile of Omicron RBD is distinct from previous SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern https://e-jemed.org/study-finds-antigenic-profile-of-omicron-rbd-is-distinct-from-previous-sars-cov-2-variants-of-concern/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 10:38:00 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/study-finds-antigenic-profile-of-omicron-rbd-is-distinct-from-previous-sars-cov-2-variants-of-concern/ The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) which is responsible for the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is constantly mutating and reemerging as new variants of concern (COVs). These mutant strains pose threats of increased spread of infection and host immune evasion despite vaccination. Study: Reduced antigenicity of Omicron decreases host serological […]]]>

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) which is responsible for the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is constantly mutating and reemerging as new variants of concern (COVs). These mutant strains pose threats of increased spread of infection and host immune evasion despite vaccination.

Study: Reduced antigenicity of Omicron decreases host serological response. Image Credit: MedMoMedia/Shutterstock


The VOC–Omicron (B.1.1.529), which emerged late last year, was found to harbor numerous mutations, 11 of which localize to the receptor binding site (RBS), the main target of antibody.

The study

A new study published on bioRxiv* preprint server aimed to clarify whether extensive receptor-binding domain (RBD) mutations could affect the magnitude and immunodominance hierarchy of the host antibody response.

Here, the RBD antigenic profiles for the Wuhan (WT) strain of SARS-CoV-2 were studied. This systematic study used a deep learning geometric model (ScanNet10) to predict epitopes.

Results

Calculation of antibody-binding propensity found correlations with structurally determined RBD epitope frequency. The results confirmed that RBS residues have a strong propensity for all RBDs. COVs – Alpha, Beta and Delta showed moderate increases in RBS antigenicity, while that of Omicron was significantly reduced.

It was also noted that eight Omicron mutations (53%) contributed to decreased antigenicity, while the other five Omicron mutations increased antigenicity. Meanwhile, only 26% of point mutations decreased antigenicity. These results indicated that Omicron’s lower antigenicity may have transpired from evolutionary alterations.

On the analysis of adaptive immune responses of immunized mice in vitro, robust and comparable T cell responses were detected. In particular, splenocytes from these animals produced elevated levels of interferon (IFN)γ in the setting of reinfection with WT, Delta, or Omicron, signifying a Th1-mediated immune response. Moreover, these animals also elicited a strong Th17 response. Similarly, the local response in the lungs recorded IFNγ and IL-17 responses.

Measurement of antibody titers revealed that those of sera immunized with Omicron were significantly lower by more than 15 times than those of WT, as well as other COVs. Therefore, the conclusions of the live the experiments resembled the deep learning model and showed that mutations can impair the antigenicity of Omicron.

When evaluating the cross-reactivity of immunized sera, it was found that WT-immunized sera had higher titers against RBD Alpha and Delta and conferred reduced activity against Beta and more significantly against Omicron. Of note, antibody evasion by VOCs replicated those revealed in clinical data. Therefore, the RBD immunodominance hierarchy was identical among mice and humans.

Additionally, sera immunized with Omicron were detected with significantly lower antibody titers against other COVs, suggesting that Omicron’s RBS is highly antigenic. Cross-reacting antibodies from sera immunized with Omicron with WT RBD showed only a small fraction of the response of sera immunized with WT to Omicron.

Evaluation of the cross-reactivity of beta-immune sera showed more promising results against Omicron. The SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus assay revealed that despite some cross-reactivity against Omicron, the neutralizing activities of WT-immunized sera were negligible. Incidentally, sera immunized with Omicron themselves failed to neutralize Omicron VOCs, nor were they potent against the WT strain.

This study used structural modeling and longitudinal analysis of hCOV229E (cold coronavirus) RBDs, which indicated a downward trend in antigenicity on the RBS, which was sustained through 2010. This pattern appears have deviated over the past decade. To explore the potential to further reduce the antigenicity of SARS-CoV-2, new stability-preserving RBD variants – with Omicron-like mutations – have been created. Many such variants have been shown to have lower antigenicity than Omicron; thus, the antigenicity of this variant could probably fade.

Conclusion

In summary, Omicron convalescent sera extracted from unvaccinated individuals were only weakly neutralizing Omicron VOCs. Omicron convalescent serums could barely neutralize other VOCs. The results were consistent with preclinical vaccine trials as well as clinical data and revealed the underlying mechanism that renders the host immune response suppressed against Omicron’s COV. Furthermore, the results elucidated the future course of viral evolution and highlighted future challenges that may be posed when developing effective vaccines targeting Omicron’s COV.

*Important Notice

bioRxiv publishes preliminary scientific reports that are not peer-reviewed and, therefore, should not be considered conclusive, guide clinical practice/health-related behaviors, or treated as established information.

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Green infrastructure development is key to boosting recovery along the BRI https://e-jemed.org/green-infrastructure-development-is-key-to-boosting-recovery-along-the-bri/ Sun, 16 Jan 2022 06:56:15 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/green-infrastructure-development-is-key-to-boosting-recovery-along-the-bri/ The key UN report on the world economy, released on Thursday, shows that the rapid spread of the Omicron variant COVID-19 has held back a rapid recovery, thwarting signs of solid growth at the end of last year. the Situation and outlook for the world economy in 2022 (WESP), produced by the United Nations Department […]]]>

The key UN report on the world economy, released on Thursday, shows that the rapid spread of the Omicron variant COVID-19 has held back a rapid recovery, thwarting signs of solid growth at the end of last year.

the Situation and outlook for the world economy in 2022 (WESP), produced by the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA), cites a cocktail of problems that are slowing the economy, namely new waves of COVID-19[female[feminine infections, lingering labor market and supply chain challenges, and growing inflationary pressures.

The slowdown is expected to continue next year. After an encouraging 5.5% expansion in 2021 – driven by strong consumer spending and some recovery in investment, with trade in goods exceeding pre-pandemic levels – global output is expected to rise by just 4.0 % in 2022 and 3.5% in 2023.

“Bridging the inequality gap”

Commenting on the launch of the report, António Guterres, the UN Secretary-General, said that, with WESP calling for more targeted and coordinated policy and financial measures, it is time to close the inequality gaps within and between countries. them. “If we work in solidarity – as one human family – we can make 2022 a true year of recovery for people and economies,” he said.

Liu Zhenmin, Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, drew attention to the importance of a coordinated and sustained global approach to containing COVID-19 that includes universal access to vaccines, and warned that without this, “the pandemic will continue to pose the greatest risk to an inclusive and sustainable recovery of the global economy”.

The report predicts that developing countries will be hit harder in the long term than wealthier nations. Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean are expected to experience significantly lower growth than pre-pandemic projections, leading to more poverty and less progress on sustainable development and climate action.

The number of people living in extreme poverty is expected to remain well above pre-pandemic levels, with poverty expected to increase further in the most vulnerable economies: in Africa, the absolute number of people living in poverty is expected to increase until 2023. In contrast, the economies of richer countries are expected to recover almost completely by next year.

Safety nets

The special financial measures put in place by many governments since the pandemic – such as bailouts, improved social protection and job support – should, according to the report, remain in place to ensure a strong recovery.

However, in light of rising inflation, several central banks have begun to reverse their extraordinary monetary response to the crisis.

Many low-income developing countries face an unsustainable external debt burden, amid sharply rising interest rates.

Additional borrowing during the pandemic and rising debt service costs have put many on the brink of a debt crisis. These countries urgently need additional and coordinated international support for debt relief, the report notes.

Jobs, slow to reappear

Employment levels are expected to remain well below pre-pandemic levels for the next two years, and possibly beyond. Labor force participation in the United States and Europe remains at historic lows, as many of those who lost their jobs or left the workforce during the pandemic have yet to return.

These shortages in developed economies come on top of other pressures, such as inflation and supply chain challenges.

At the same time, job growth in developing countries remains weak, amid slower progress on immunization and limited stimulus spending. Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Western Asia are expected to see a slow recovery in employment. In many countries, the pace of job creation is not sufficient to compensate for past job losses.

The WESP was released two days after the last World Bank Global Economic Outlook report, which reached similar conclusions, predicting that, given the rapid spread of the Omicron variant, the COVID-19 pandemic will continue to disrupt economic activity in the near term.

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New Binghamton University students connect with local youth https://e-jemed.org/new-binghamton-university-students-connect-with-local-youth/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 03:52:08 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/new-binghamton-university-students-connect-with-local-youth/ During the fall 2021 semester, students in Binghamton University’s Emerging Leaders Program (ELP) found a way to give back to the local community still recovering from the COVID-19 pandemic. ELP is a certificate-based program that takes place each fall semester and is designed for freshmen and transfer students during their first semester at Binghamton to […]]]>

During the fall 2021 semester, students in Binghamton University’s Emerging Leaders Program (ELP) found a way to give back to the local community still recovering from the COVID-19 pandemic.

ELP is a certificate-based program that takes place each fall semester and is designed for freshmen and transfer students during their first semester at Binghamton to help them develop and practice leadership skills in the within a specific area of ​​interest. Students are grouped into six Knowledge Communities (KCs) – Arts and Humanities; business and entrepreneurship; Environment and Ecology; Global awareness and citizenship; Public Service; and Sports, Recreation and Wellness. This year, the program included 72 new students, 12 peer mentors (current Binghamton students, some of whom are ELP alumni), and faculty and staff advisors.

Tyler Lenga, assistant director of transition and student success, who oversees the ELP, explained that the program allows students to learn about the local community and connect with organizations in the area as well as with members of the university community through the planning and implementation of a service project.

“They are tasked with finding a community organization to work with and then designing what their project will be as it relates to their particular knowledge community,” Lenga said. “The theme of their KC is the lens through which they view leadership throughout the semester. They look at what it is like to take on leadership roles in business and entrepreneurship or what it looks like in the arts and humanities.

Students conclude their service projects with a poster symposium, where each group creates a poster explaining the work they have done and the lessons they have learned along the way.

According to Lenga, this year the students focused primarily on helping local youth by designing events that taught them about the issues that affect them.

“Early conversations focused on young people and issues that may be more prevalent due to the pandemic,” Lenga said. “The students who entered the program spent their senior year of high school virtually, and I think that was a great conversation for the groups. They learned about the needs of the local Binghamton community, but also how those needs relate to young people in particular.

The Sports, Recreation and Wellness KC focused on childhood obesity and sought to teach local youth about the importance of a healthy lifestyle. The group partnered with the Lee Barta Community Center in Binghamton to host a healthy lifestyles fair for middle schoolers. Some of the fair’s activities included a Zumba class, lessons in how to make healthy snacks, a smoothie bike — a stationary bike that harnesses the rider’s pedaling energy to power a blender — and more.

Barbara Santos, a sophomore majoring in integrative neuroscience and one of two Sports, Recreation and Wellness KC mentors, said she chose to return as a mentor because of the impact of the ELP. about her stay in Binghamton when she participated in the program.

“As a freshman during a pandemic, I found it difficult to get to know other students and make friends,” Santos said. “However, being part of ELP has allowed me to positively impact the Binghamton community and meet some amazing people along the way. My mentors and peers have become like a second family to me. ELP has been an eye-opening experience. As I learned about the ongoing issues in the world, I grew as a person. I developed a greater passion for helping the community and those around me.

Also focusing on young people, the KC Environment and Ecology worked with Port Dickinson Primary School, teaching second graders about food shortages and climate change. The group gave a presentation on how students can protect the environment and organized an interactive activity, giving primary school students marigold seeds to take home.

“What they achieved was great,” Lenga said. “They worked with young people and tried to inspire them to do more to protect the climate. The school district said it was one of the first things like this they’ve been able to do since the pandemic began, so they appreciated being able to provide something like this for their students as well.

Olivia Connolly, a sophomore in biology, and Joe Knudsen, a junior majoring in integrative neuroscience, served as KC environment and ecology mentors.

Knudsen said that although he did not participate in the program as a mentee, he was excited to take this opportunity and learn more about how to be a leader, not as someone who simply delegates tasks, but as someone people can come to and help.

“ELP provided me with an outlet to leverage my current leadership roles,” Knudsen said. “I think the difference between being a good leader and a great leader is mentorship. I learned to be a guide and a confidant. Being a role model became a job rather than a passive task. As a mentor, I felt responsible for the successes and failures of my team, not because I was leading it, but because I was invested in the team.

Connolly was a new ELP student during her freshman year at Binghamton, where she learned important leadership skills such as confidence, public speaking, and how to work in groups.

“I decided to come back as a mentor because I looked up to my mentors while I was in ELP,” Connolly said. “I also wanted to push myself to take on a leadership role that was intimidating to me because I knew I would become a better version of myself, which I believe I have. Being a leader on this project has been one of the best experiences I’ve had. The most rewarding part was the relationships I made with my mentees. Guiding them through this project and their personal issues has made me a better person. I learned a lot about myself and how to be a leader from them.

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Development History of Global Alfalfa Concentrate Market 2021 Created by Top Manufacturer – Desialis, Shaanxi Jiaherb Phytochem, Naturalin, Nanjing Zhi Bai Cui Biology Technology https://e-jemed.org/development-history-of-global-alfalfa-concentrate-market-2021-created-by-top-manufacturer-desialis-shaanxi-jiaherb-phytochem-naturalin-nanjing-zhi-bai-cui-biology-technology/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 11:36:17 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/development-history-of-global-alfalfa-concentrate-market-2021-created-by-top-manufacturer-desialis-shaanxi-jiaherb-phytochem-naturalin-nanjing-zhi-bai-cui-biology-technology/ [ad_1] the Global Alfalfa Concentrate Market through MarketsandResearch.biz Studies current market conditions and projects industry growth from 2021 to 2027. This research examines past growth trends, current growth factors, and anticipated future developments. The key outlook for the Alfalfa Concentrate industry is assessed and the components that stimulate and will drive the development of the […]]]>


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the Global Alfalfa Concentrate Market through MarketsandResearch.biz Studies current market conditions and projects industry growth from 2021 to 2027. This research examines past growth trends, current growth factors, and anticipated future developments. The key outlook for the Alfalfa Concentrate industry is assessed and the components that stimulate and will drive the development of the industry are highlighted. Past growth trends, current growth factors, and anticipated future developments are all examined in this study.

Market position, profit margins, future progress, economic variables, opportunities, difficulties, dangers and barriers to entry are all factors in the Alfalfa Concentrate business. When analyzing the manufacturing process, the distribution of production plants, capacities, raw material supply, R&D status, technology source and commercial production are all taken into account. This section provides an overview of the alfalfa concentrate industry in general.

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Their organizational structure as well as their production technique are studied. This data is analyzed using SWOT analysis and other methods to offer an informed opinion on the state of the market, encourage the adoption of an ideal development plan for any organization or provide insight into the market. future state of the alfalfa concentrate industry.

The industry is divided into divisions to adapt to different market characteristics.

  • Animal feed industry
  • Food industry
  • Medicines and health products
  • Others

Every major player in the business is investigated, including

  • Desialis
  • Phytochem Jiaherb Shaanxi
  • Naturaline
  • Nanjing Zhi Bai Cui Biology Technology
  • Changsha Active Ingredient Group
  • Biotanical extract 3W
  • Refine biology
  • Hunan NutraMax
  • Acetar Bio-Tech
  • Carli Group

It focuses on different market segments. Alfalfa concentrate

  • Alfalfa concentrate powder
  • Alfalfa concentrate pellets
  • Others

The industry is divided into distinct sectors.

  • North America (United States, Canada and Mexico)
  • Europe (Germany, France, United Kingdom, Russia, Italy and rest of Europe)
  • Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India, Southeast Asia and Australia)
  • South America (Brazil, Argentina, Colombia and the rest of South America)
  • Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Egypt, South Africa and Rest of Middle East and Africa)

ACCESS TO THE FULL REPORT: https://www.marketsandresearch.biz/report/242793/global-alfalfa-concentrate-market-2021-by-manufacturers-regions-type-and-application-forecast-to-2026

This is divided into several sections. This research assesses the market potential of each geographic area in terms of growth rate, macroeconomic factors and consumer buying habits. The research provides companies and other customers interested in entering the global or regional market with the most recent comparison statistics as well as practical advice. Market position, profit margins, future developments, economics, opportunities, obstacles, risks, and entry barriers are all taken into account in the Lucerne Concentrate industry.

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Biology is unlikely to cause ethnic differences in COVID-19 risk for healthcare workers https://e-jemed.org/biology-is-unlikely-to-cause-ethnic-differences-in-covid-19-risk-for-healthcare-workers/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 20:44:55 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/biology-is-unlikely-to-cause-ethnic-differences-in-covid-19-risk-for-healthcare-workers/ [ad_1] Credit: Unsplash / CC0 Public domain Differences in risk of COVID-19 infection between ethnic minority healthcare workers and their white colleagues are likely due to domestic and work factors rather than biology, according to the largest and most recent study detailed on the subject, co-edited by researchers at University College London (UCL). Previous research […]]]>


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Credit: Unsplash / CC0 Public domain

Differences in risk of COVID-19 infection between ethnic minority healthcare workers and their white colleagues are likely due to domestic and work factors rather than biology, according to the largest and most recent study detailed on the subject, co-edited by researchers at University College London (UCL).

Previous research has shown that healthcare workers from ethnic minority groups are at a disproportionately higher risk of contracting COVID-19 than their white colleagues. Baseline data from the UK-REACH study confirms this. Of 10,772 healthcare workers participating in the study, black healthcare workers were significantly more likely to have evidence of COVID-19 infection than white healthcare workers.

However, after work-related factors, such as position and place of work, the number of COVID-19 patients they have treated, and lifestyle factors, such as living with other healthcare workers and age are taken into account, this difference in risk is no longer seen. This implies that these home and lifestyle factors, rather than anything innate / biological, are responsible for the disproportionate risk of COVID-19 among ethnic minority healthcare workers.

The study, posted on the MedRxiv pre-print server and carried out with the University of Leicester and the University of Nottingham found that a higher risk of COVID-19 infection among healthcare workers was associated nursing or midwifery work, exposure to increasing numbers of COVID-19 patients, lack of access to PPE, living with another key worker, and working in hospitals or ambulances.

Additionally, those working in Scotland and the South West of England have a lower risk of infection than healthcare workers in the West Midlands, as are those working in intensive care units (ICUs). .

Co-author Professor Katherine Woolf (UCL Medical School) said: “There is concern that black healthcare workers are at greater risk of reporting COVID-19 infection. Our study suggests that this higher risk was due to the fact that black healthcare workers were more exposed to the virus at work and / or outside of work, rather than because of inherent biological or genetic factors. reduce their chances of catching COVID-19, in particular by being supported to take booster vaccines. This is especially important now, as the Omicron variant of the virus is much easier to catch than previous variants. “

Dr Manish Pareek, associate professor of infectious diseases at the Biomedical Research Center at the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leicester and lead investigator of the UK-REACH study, said: ‘Our study shows the importance of occupational risk and life at home. For example, it shows a strong association between the number of COVID-19 patients followed by a healthcare professional and the healthcare professional’s risk of infection. This is not in all situations: times their risk of infection was higher than those who had not reported access problems.

“On the other hand, those who worked in intensive care units, where long-sleeved gowns and respiratory masks are recommended at all times, were at less risk than those who did not work in this environment. This supports the idea of ​​improving PPE standards for all healthcare workers. Managing COVID-19 patients, regardless of location or type of procedure performed, can have a beneficial impact in reducing infection rates among staff. “

Dr Christopher Martin, academic researcher in infectious diseases at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust and first author of the study, said: “We have identified the main risk factors associated with COVID-19 infection among role workers and living with other key workers.Healthcare workers from black ethnic groups in our study were younger, more likely to work in environments such as inpatient care, more likely to see a number more COVID-19 patients and less likely to report having access to appropriate PPE at all times than their white colleagues. They were also more likely to live with other key workers and in more disadvantaged areas.

“All of these factors increase their risk of COVID-19. However, once these factors are taken into account, the difference in risk of infection between black and white healthcare workers was negligible, suggesting that the differences in life occupational and family health workers from ethnic minorities – some of which are linked to inequalities more generally – lead to different infection rates. These important findings should inform policies, including targeted vaccination strategies and health assessments. risks aimed at protecting healthcare workers during future waves of the COVID-19 pandemic. ”

The results are particularly timely, given the emergence of the highly infectious Omicron variant of the coronavirus, which may be better able to evade vaccination-induced protection against infection, which could lead to more numbers. high number of healthcare workers contracting the disease.

The authors acknowledge that the study has limitations, such as the potential for self-selection bias, meaning that healthcare workers might be more inclined to complete the survey if they felt they were running greater risk of infection, for example. However, the study is the largest and most detailed to date, focusing specifically on the risks to healthcare workers. The sample of 10,772 people is broadly representative of the NHS workforce, albeit with fewer support staff, and the infection rates reported in the study are consistent with those reported in other studies British.

The results were posted on MedRxiv as a pre-print, meaning the results have yet to be peer reviewed.


Long-term COVID impact on ethnic minority healthcare workers investigated


More information:
Christopher A. Martin et al, Predictors of SARS-CoV-2 infection in a multiethnic cohort of UK healthcare workers: a nationwide prospective cohort study (UK-REACH), ( 2021). DOI: 10.1101 / 2021.12.16.21267934

Provided by University College London

Quote: Biology is unlikely to cause ethnic differences in COVID-19 risk for healthcare workers (2021, December 22) Retrieved December 22, 2021 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-12 -biology-ethnic-differences-covid-healthcare. html

This document is subject to copyright. Other than fair use for private study or research purposes, no part may be reproduced without written permission. The content is provided for information only.

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Arts & Culture Newsletter: Kennedy Center Honors celebrates Joni Mitchell, and so do we https://e-jemed.org/arts-culture-newsletter-kennedy-center-honors-celebrates-joni-mitchell-and-so-do-we/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 13:30:49 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/arts-culture-newsletter-kennedy-center-honors-celebrates-joni-mitchell-and-so-do-we/ [ad_1] Hello and welcome to the UT Arts & Culture newsletter. I am David L. Coddon, and here’s your guide to all the essentials in San Diego arts and culture this week. If ever there was a year to watch the Kennedy Center Honors, it’s this one. The televised broadcast of the recent ceremony at […]]]>


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Hello and welcome to the UT Arts & Culture newsletter.

I am David L. Coddon, and here’s your guide to all the essentials in San Diego arts and culture this week.

If ever there was a year to watch the Kennedy Center Honors, it’s this one. The televised broadcast of the recent ceremony at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, DC will air Wednesday at 9 p.m. on CBS-Channel 8. The winners: opera-bass-baritone Justino diaz, creator of “Saturday Night Live” Lorne michaels, founder of Motown Records Gordy Bay, the “Divine Miss M” Bette Midler and Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Joni mitchell.

Each is worthy of tribute for their lifelong artistic achievements. I am the happiest for Mitchell, who has been a big part of my life since I was a teenager. Initially all I knew about her was that she wrote “Both Sides Now”, that hit song by Judy Collins. (I would later hear Mitchell’s introspective version on his album “Clouds”, at which point I started to think about love from a very different point of view.)

But it wasn’t until I sat down next to a neighborhood crush and listened to her play guitar (a little awkwardly) and sing (most sincerely) a song from the album “Blue “from Mitchell that I thought as a teenager that there was something distinctly beautiful and intensely personal about writing Joni Mitchell songs. I became a fan. I’m sure none of my friends were.

Some of my college dorm records would be “For the Roses” (my favorite Mitchell album), “Court and Spark”, “The Hissing of Summer Lawns” and “Hejira”. I would play LPs as a DJ on the University of Southern California campus radio station and play them on dates, and in the following years I would buy them again on tape and CD.

As I grew older, I listened less and less to my Joni Mitchell albums and maybe forgot how much she meant to me. Then, a few years ago, on the opening night of Cameron Crowe’s “Almost Famous” musical at the Old Globe Theater, she was there. As I walked out after the performance, I found Mitchell, staring supremely and brilliantly at Joni, at the back of the theater. Everything that was exquisite in his art was ebbing away. Congratulations on your honor at the Kennedy Center, Mrs. Mitchell.

Theater

Tom Stephenson plays Ebenezer Scrooge in Cygnet Theatre’s “A Christmas Carol”, which premieres November 23.

(Ken Jacques)

It wouldn’t be the holidays without “A Christmas Carol, “Right? Narratively speaking, Charles Dickens has a monopoly on our hearts and our collective conscience, which is why his lessons in compassion and recuperation never get old around Christmas time.

As UT’s Pam Kragen pointed out in her theater notebook, there are currently three Scroogey productions on stage. I still enjoyed Cygnet TheaterAnnual “A Christmas Carol,” which stars Tom Stephenson as a Scrooge whose transformation is utterly believable. I also look forward to David McBean’s delicious performances of Marley’s Ghost and The Ghost of the Christmas Gift each year.

Lamb Players Theater "A Christmas Carol."

“A Christmas Carol” from Lamb’s Players Theater.

(Ken Jacques)

This year, Lamb Players Theater offers its own “Christmas Carol”. Read Kragen’s review. The old globe also returns his “BIG San Diego Christmas Show by Ebenezer Scrooge”.

Classical music

Happy Mendelssohn to you and yours. German composer Felix Mendelssohn’s “Frolocket ihr Volker auf Erden”, which was written for Christmas liturgy purposes, is part of Saturday’s program when La Jolla Symphony & Choir presents his holiday concert.

The 7 p.m. choral performance at St. James by-the-Sea Episcopal Church in La Jolla will also feature compositions by British symphonist Vaughn Williams, English composer John Rutter and German composer Hugo Distler, among others.

Book an event

Spike Lee in front of a wall of red flowers

A 2019 archive photo of Spike Lee at the opening of Tyler Perry Studios in Atlanta.

(Elijah Nouvelage / Invision / AP)

You know what better way than to mark off a copy of Spike Lee’s new book “Spike” this holiday season? See and hear Lee in person. Sure, that will mean a trip to Los Angeles on Sunday, but if you’re a fan of Lee’s movies, what’s a little traffic?

Book Soup, the Sunset Strip in Los Angeles, welcomes “A conversation with Spike LeeHosted by fellow filmmaker Ernest R. Dickerson from 5 pm to 6 pm. The event will not take place at Book Soup but at the downtown Colburn School of Performing Arts, located next to the Museum of Contemporary Art on South Grand Avenue. Tickets, which include a copy of “Spike,” cost $ 59.

Visual art

My friend (and UT Arts freelance writer) Seth Combs gave me an Instagram review that I now share with you: Monday 6-10 p.m., @northparklego will host an art exhibition entitled “My brick neighborhood”At Tribute Pizza on North Park Way. LEGO models of businesses in the North Park area and adjacent neighborhoods are promised.

The event for all ages includes food, drink and a silent auction. Check out more details on your Instagram.

UCTV

University of California Television invites you to take advantage of this special selection of programs from across the University of California. Descriptions courtesy and text written by UCTV staff:

“Music is always subject to change – La Jolla Symphony & Chorus”: La Jolla Symphony & Chorus continued their virtual concert series with a scaled-down version of their last concert. Continuing to take small steps towards a return to live performances, LJSC transformed the traditional orchestra to present small ensembles in order to showcase its core of talented musicians. This concert is in three sections, representing the different families of orchestral instruments – brass, winds and strings. Under the direction of conductor Steven Schick, the brass section performed three pieces by William Byrd, Gabrieli and Tielman Susato; the wind section performed a piece by Mozart; and the strings played Barber and Tchaikovsky.

“Healthy aging in the era of pandemics”: The COVID-19 pandemic has taught us all that maintaining a healthy lifestyle is extremely important, even more so for the elderly who are in a higher risk category when it comes to the virus. In November, UC San Diego’s Center for Healthy Aging hosted a one-day symposium focusing on Healthy Aging in the Age of Pandemics. True to the times, the symposium was held on Zoom allowing researchers from across the country to join and share their latest work. Topics covered included wisdom and social connections, a healthy lifestyle and exercise, a good night’s sleep, technology for the elderly, electronic psychotherapy and magnetic brain stimulation.

“In-depth look at COVID-19: adapting to a COVID world”: As the second anniversary approaches the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as the specter of epidemics during the winter season, the world continues to grapple with uncertainties. Join the experts at UC San Diego as they describe how epidemic modeling and data-driven approaches led to UC San Diego’s Return to Learn program strategies. Scientists are also discussing the latest research on proteins known as interferons and their promise as COVID-19 antiviral therapies. And finally, listen to evolutionary biologists talk about what we have learned about the transmission of the disease, the changes from the original strain of the Wuhan virus, and what these variants could mean for the future of this pandemic. .

And finally … The best events of the weekend

A boat decorated with Christmas lights

(KC Alfred / The San Diego Union-Tribune)

Here are the main events happening in San Diego from Thursday, December 16 through Sunday, December 19.


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Three other UGA professors elected to the NAI https://e-jemed.org/three-other-uga-professors-elected-to-the-nai/ Fri, 10 Dec 2021 14:45:31 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/three-other-uga-professors-elected-to-the-nai/ [ad_1] UGA now has 12 professors to receive the honor of the National Academy of Inventors University of Georgia professors Anumantha Kanthasamy, S. Edward Law and Scott NeSmith were elected Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors. Including these three new scholarship holders, 12 UGA professors have received this honor, all since 2013. NAI Fellows […]]]>


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UGA now has 12 professors to receive the honor of the National Academy of Inventors

University of Georgia professors Anumantha Kanthasamy, S. Edward Law and Scott NeSmith were elected Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors. Including these three new scholarship holders, 12 UGA professors have received this honor, all since 2013.

NAI Fellows should be involved in the creation or facilitation of inventions that have a tangible impact on the quality of life, economic development and the well-being of society. Becoming an NAI Fellow is the highest professional honor bestowed only on academic inventors. According to the organization, $ 3 trillion in revenue has been generated based on the findings of NAI Fellow. The research and entrepreneurship of NAI Fellows has resulted in more than 42,700 US patents issued, 13,000 licensed technologies and 3,200 new companies, not to mention more than one million jobs created, according to NAI.

“As Director and Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), I am delighted to welcome our newly elected members to the NAI,” said Karen Burg, UGA vice president of research.

“Scott NeSmith, Ed Law and Anumantha Kanthasamy represent the breadth of applications that exist in the UGA research enterprise,” said Burg. Dr. Kanthasamy’s research has tremendous potential to bring new treatments and hope to people with Parkinson’s disease; Dr. NeSmith’s work in developing new varieties of blueberries has helped establish Georgia as one of the leading US states in blueberry production; and Dr. Law’s development of electrostatic spraying technologies boosted Georgian agriculture before being applied in other economic sectors, including disinfecting surfaces during the Covid-19 pandemic Congratulations to Anumantha, Scott and Ed for this well-deserved recognition of their research and invention efforts.

Scott Ne Smith

Do smith is a professor of horticulture at the UGA Griffin campus and has led the UGA Blueberry Breeding Program since 1998. With NeSmith at the helm, the program has released 31 commercial varieties and nine ornamental varieties.

“It takes 10 to 12 years to produce a new variety of blueberries,” said NeSmith. “UGA has one of the oldest blueberry breeding programs in the country, and our team has worked hard to build on that foundation. We were able to select early maturing southern highbush varieties suitable for the growing environment of Georgia.

Southern highbush blueberries are a hybrid between northern highbush blueberries and a type of southern blueberry called rabbit eye blueberry. These hybrids produce high-quality fruit, but don’t require the cold temperatures that northern highbush plants require. Through the efforts of the program, NeSmith and his team brought to market varieties that ripened earlier than older varieties and offered an alternative crop for Georgian farmers looking to diversify.

Today, blueberries are the # 1 fruit produced in the state. Georgia farmers cultivate more than 18,000 acres, which produces 39 million pounds of blueberries valued at over $ 120 million.

Anumantha Kanthasamy

Kanthasamy is an internationally renowned researcher in Parkinson’s disease and associated neurodegenerative disorders. As the inaugural John H. “Johnny” Isakson Chair and the Georgia Research Alliance’s distinguished researcher in Parkinson’s disease, his work ranges from neurological science to the identification of biomarkers for the early detection of disease. Parkinson disease. Kanthasamy founded two startups, PK Biosciences and Probiome Therapeutics, to facilitate the commercialization of drug candidates and biomarkers resulting from his research.

“I am truly honored with this special recognition for our innovative translational research in neurodegenerative diseases,” said Kanthasamy. “It’s quite humbling to be allied with the cadre of amazing innovators and inventors elected to the NAI.”

Prior to joining UGA, Kanthasamy was director of the Iowa Center for Advanced Neurotoxicology, where he and his research team study the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in neuronal degeneration caused by Parkinson’s disease and other diseases. .

S. Edward Law

Law is DW Brooks Emeritus Professor Emeritus at UGA College of Engineering and was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1996. He began researching the effect of static charges on chemicals, or electrostats, at the North Carolina State University under Henry Bowen in the 1960s. Inspired by Rachel Carson’s classic ecology book, “Silent Spring,” Law began to study how to apply an electrical charge to pesticides when they were sprayed. on crops to reduce the amount of chemicals needed.

“I give Henry major credit for starting the idea,” Law said. “He was working on a way to reduce the impact of chemicals that were necessary but so harmful to the environment. After studying with him, I was fortunate to work with people like Ken Giles, Steve Cooper, and Brett Therman, who all had a significant impact on electrostatics.

Law’s research led to better electrostatic spray technology that has been applied in a wide range of functions because of its ability to make chemicals stick to things. Tractor spray nozzles which allow herbicides to adhere to plants and reduce runoff have been marketed and used in the cotton industry. This technology has also been applied to spray paints, spray tanning machines and a range of disinfectant sprayers that were essential in the fight against the pandemic.

Kanthasamy, Law and NeSmith, along with 161 other new NAI members, will be inducted at the NAI Annual Meeting on June 13, 2022 in Phoenix, Arizona. Drew Hirshfeld, Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property of the United States Patent and Trademark Office, will deliver the keynote address for the event.

The election of the most recent UGA National Academy of Inventors Fellow comes at a time when the university Innovation district The initiative accelerates the commercialization of research, increases opportunities for experiential learning, and expands university-industry collaboration. The university recently dedicated its Delta Innovation Hub, which hosts several innovation and entrepreneurship programs.

“Having three faculty members elected to the National Academy of Inventors in a single year highlights the extraordinary impact of the University of Georgia’s growing research and innovation ecosystem,” said S. Jack Hu, Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs of the University and Dean. “As an institution, we are committed to harnessing the expertise of our talented and dedicated faculty for the benefit of society. “

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Many men do not take good care of themselves. COVID-19 vaccination rates are the latest in a problem as old as medicine. https://e-jemed.org/many-men-do-not-take-good-care-of-themselves-covid-19-vaccination-rates-are-the-latest-in-a-problem-as-old-as-medicine/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 10:06:30 +0000 https://e-jemed.org/many-men-do-not-take-good-care-of-themselves-covid-19-vaccination-rates-are-the-latest-in-a-problem-as-old-as-medicine/ [ad_1] They are less likely to see the doctor. They eat less fruits and vegetables. They are more likely to smoke, die in alcohol-related crashes, and engage in other activities that can lead to traumatic brain injury. By almost all known measures, men are far from women when it comes to taking care of themselves. […]]]>


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They are less likely to see the doctor. They eat less fruits and vegetables. They are more likely to smoke, die in alcohol-related crashes, and engage in other activities that can lead to traumatic brain injury. By almost all known measures, men are far from women when it comes to taking care of themselves.

And for months now, to the surprise of few in the medical profession, men have consistently fallen behind women when it comes to getting the COVID-19 vaccine. As of mid-November, 57% of men and boys in the United States were fully immunized, compared to 61% of women and girls.

The reluctance of men to seek medical care is so well documented and so exhaustively discussed that it has become a policy. And that can make solutions difficult, said James Leone, professor of health at Bridgewater State University in Massachusetts.

“The reason men often live sicker and die sooner is because we allow it,” he said. “As a society, we don’t go beyond the surface levels and just say, ‘Oh, that’s a shame. What’s wrong with guys? “

But there’s nothing funny about men living sicker and dying earlier than women – especially when the decisions they make about their health can have medical and economic ramifications for their families, as it is. became evident during the COVID-19 pandemic. More than 40,000 children have lost a parent to COVID-19, and many more have experienced food or housing insecurity after their parents lost their jobs or were unable to work.

So what’s going on with men and their health?

Doctors, psychologists, evolutionary theorists seem to agree that it all comes down to the fact that men have a higher tolerance for risk. But unraveling the cause is complicated. Some researchers believe the trait is a genetic holdover from ancient times, when men who exhibited aggressive and risky behavior could compete with their peers for mates and food. Others say that men’s higher risk tolerance is primarily an acquired quality, fostered by social and cultural norms of masculinity.

READ MORE: In most cases, women age better than men and live longer. Scientists are trying to figure out why.

While women can also take risks, on average the difference is undeniable, said Daniel J. Kruger, evolutionary psychologist at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. Regardless of the combination of nature and education at work, these characteristics have been deeply embedded in our society over the centuries. Public health campaigns are exploring new ways to resonate their messages with men, but changing such ingrained behavior will take considerable and concerted effort.

“It goes way back in our evolutionary history,” he said. “It doesn’t determine our behavior, but it certainly influences it.”

During the pandemic, the gender divide was highlighted.

Since 2018, researchers at Indiana University at Bloomington have conducted a long-term study of 250 opposite-sex couples, asking them about a series of what Jessica Calarco, associate professor of sociology at Indiana University , called “sensitive topics” for new parents. – among them breastfeeding, childhood vaccines, co-sleep and when one or the other partner returns to work.

When COVID-19 hit, Calarco and his colleagues added pandemic-themed topics to the mix.

Among the main findings: two-thirds of couples disagreed about the acceptable level of risk for their family. In most cases, when the man and woman disagreed, it was the woman who was the most risk averse and who followed safety instructions the most, such as wearing masks and maintaining social distance.

“Because women were the ones who took the most risk averse positions, they were also the ones who were forced to be the peacekeepers when it turned into conflict,” Calarco said. “Women felt responsible for resolving the conflict or preventing it from escalating.

They did so by taking on the burden of ensuring the safety of the family themselves – and in many cases by taking extra precautions to protect children or elderly parents from their spouse’s riskier behavior, he said. she declared.

“This is not a function of biological differences, but of pressures on women to take care of themselves, to think of themselves and everyone else around them,” said Calarco. “Being pushed into this worrying role within their family or community makes them more aware of the risk than men. “

In other words, women make decisions – including health decisions – based on what they think is best for themselves and for everyone else in their care, which ultimately leads to more conservative choices. Men more often base their decisions on their own personal risk tolerance, which leads to riskier choices, Calarco said.

Leone calls this “normative contentment”.

“It’s kind of a self-fulfilling prophecy,” he said. “Men and boys are going to do things that are bad for their health and we kind of accept that as part of our culture. It’s almost like we’re giving the free social pass to the men and boys so they can just take off and come see us when you have a problem. “

Cultural norms aside, biology ultimately leads the way, Michigan’s Kruger said. While the differences between men and women are not black and white, studies have nevertheless suggested that genetic predisposition plays a role in their varying inclinations for risk.

The phenomenon dates back to our ancestors a long time ago, when men had to fight over partners in a way that women did not. Most women had children, but only the strongest men had partners. They used their physical strength to establish powerful leadership positions within their communities and prevent other men from associating, he said.

“There was a lot of incentive to compete, to get into these powerful, high-level positions where you can attract and retain partners,” Kruger said. “There is a risk of dying without reproducing and a greater motivation to take risks to make it happen.”

Our physical and social environments have, of course, changed dramatically. Back then, no one planned a doctor’s appointment or got a shot, and no modern American’s survival hinges on their ability to physically fend off their competition and hunt down large animals for dinner. But the state of mind born of that genetic inheritance, he said, is still there.

When public health officials sought to encourage public acceptance of vaccines, masks and other pandemic safeguards, few to no messaging initiatives were designed with gender in mind.

But evidence from other health settings shows that it’s possible to get men to be more health conscious, said Leone, who is studying methods to improve health outcomes in underserved communities.

One possibility is terminology.

The term “women’s health” is often linked to issues related to reproductive health and the health of the offspring, while “men’s health”, to the extent that it is only lip service, is isolated. . The more inclusive term “family health” would send a message to men that they too should take care of themselves, Leone said.

But how do you get the message across? It might sound simple, Leone said, but just getting men together in the same room, talking about health topics they might have avoided in the past, can help.

In Australia, for example, men are encouraged to join community organizations called “sheds”, where they discuss healthy behaviors while participating in activities such as woodworking and beekeeping.

In the United States, some healthcare providers have been successful in meeting men wherever they are, such as barber shops or sporting events, Leone said. Blood pressure tests at football games and auto shows are increasingly common in many states, for example. Or community breakfasts associated with cancer screenings, with catchy names like Pancakes & Prostates.

READ MORE: Hair Salons and Hair Salons Can Help Put COVID-19 Vaccines on the Gun | Opinion

Much of the strategy is just to get men into new habits, Leone said.

Girls are taught to be proactive about health and, as young women, are encouraged to schedule routine gynecological exams. Young men, on the other hand, may have very little reason to see a doctor, as long as they are healthy, he said. But if they build a relationship with a trusted healthcare provider, men can make lifestyle changes that can reduce the risk of chronic disease for years to come.

Modeling behavior and social influence can also be powerful in shaping health behavior, said Calarco of Indiana – especially for men, who may be less threatened by exposing what they perceive to be. a weakness if someone else does the same.

For example, research has shown that when male executives don’t take advantage of their company’s parental leave policy, new fathers don’t stoop in the organization either.

“The more others do it, the more inclined you are to do it,” she said. “When you have high-ranking men engaging in a behavior, it can send a signal that it’s okay for other men to engage in that behavior as well. “

Will all of this work with the highly politicized subject of COVID-19? Hard to say, although the vaccine mandates can make the question, in many cases, moot.

What is clear is that men and women often have different opinions when it comes to taking care of themselves, yet it is an issue that affects us all.

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