Watch Now: Bloomington-Normal Nursing Teachers Share Passion for Teaching and Receive Fellowships | Local education

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Kara Richardson dreamed of becoming a nurse and now she teaches others.






BLOOMINGTON – Three nursing professors at Bloomington-Normal will be able to expand their research and professional development with the help of a $ 10,000 scholarship for nurse educators from the Illinois Board of Higher Education.

The three recipients teach at three different schools, but they share one common trait: a passion for teaching and a desire to improve their profession.

For Monica Hall, assistant professor of nursing at Wesleyan University in Illinois, the scholarship represents an opportunity to engage undergraduates in research on the disproportionate impact of type 2 diabetes on blacks and d other minorities.






Monica Hall, assistant professor of nursing at Illinois Wesleyan University, talks about her diabetes research funded by the Nurse Education Fellowship while speaking about the gift at Stevenson Hall on Friday.


DAVID PROEBER, THE PANTAGRAPH


For Michele Shropshire, assistant professor of nursing at Illinois State University, this will allow her to continue her research with older people in areas such as falls prevention and pain management. She also plans to continue her professional development to adapt her teaching to changes in the curriculum.

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For Kara Richardson, associate professor of nursing at Heartland Community College, that means paying off student loans for her master’s degree and working on improving simulations for nursing students.






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Kara Richardson, assistant professor of nursing at Heartland Community College, uses a variety of simulators to teach nursing students at the school on Tuesday. Her scholarship will allow her to pay off part of the debt she has accumulated by obtaining her teaching diploma.


DAVID PROEBER, THE PANTAGRAPH


The aim of the scholarship program is to ensure the retention of qualified nursing professors and to supplement their salaries, according to the IBHE. Nurses can often earn more money working in a clinical setting rather than teaching.

Hall was working as a nursing diabetes educator when she was laid off. She accepted a job at Parkland College and said she found out, “I absolutely loved teaching students. I realized that my passion for education didn’t stop with patients.

Shropshire met students who observed her as she worked as a nurse at the hospital. She loved “the energy that they bring” and “their passion kind of sparked an interest in going back to school and getting into teaching.”






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Michele Shropshire


Lenore Sobota



Richardson continues to work as an emergency nurse practitioner in the emergency room at Abraham Lincoln Memorial Hospital in Lincoln, as her schedule permits.

“I love when you see the students getting things done,” Richardson said. “They work so hard. I like to be a part of that with them. “

Judy Neubrander, Dean of ISU’s Mennonite College of Nursing, said: “The IBHE Nurse Educator Fellowship provides our nursing professors with support to pursue a study or research project beyond their role as nurses. traditional teaching that advances the art and science of nursing knowledge.






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Kara Richardson, assistant professor of nursing at Heartland Community College, uses a variety of simulators to teach nursing students at the school on Tuesday. Her scholarship will allow her to pay off some of the debt she has accumulated by obtaining her graduate degree.


DAVID PROEBER, THE PANTAGRAPH


Jennifer O’Connor, Heartland’s Dean of Health Sciences and Director of Nursing, said: “One of Kara’s most exciting jobs is helping to develop our simulation program. Prior to the COVID-19 outbreak, she developed a fantastic OB hemorrhage simulation that provides much-needed training experience on a very urgent issue nurses face with obstetric complications. “

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Longer term, Richardson wants to add even more realism to nursing laboratory simulations.






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Monica Hall, assistant professor of nursing at Illinois Wesleyan University, talks about her diabetes research funded by the Nurse Education Fellowship while speaking about the gift at Stevenson Hall on Friday.


DAVID PROEBER, THE PANTAGRAPH


“I would like to develop this simulation and bring in people from the theater department and use our portable simulation vests,” she said.

The vests are programmed so that students can hear the sounds of the heart, lungs and intestines as the “patient” interacts with them, explained Richardson.

“It provides a more realistic clinical experience,” she said. “Models are great, but it’s not the same feeling as talking to a real person.”

Richardson said, “In this environment, they learn so much. … It’s a safe place for them to make mistakes.

Nursing professor Monica Hall hopes to expand her diabetes research into the classroom






Teaching at IWU comes full circle for Hall, who graduated as a nurse from IWU in 1990. Among the lessons she learned from her mentors as she uses as a teacher today, there is the importance of “being severe but also caring”.

Victoria Folse, Director and Professor of the School of Nursing at IWU, noted that “As a woman of color, Dr. Hall is frequently sought after by under-represented students, and many have approached her with interest for conduct research on conditions occurring in African American populations. . “

Watch now: Wesleyan University of Illinois professor adapts biology lab amid pandemic

“I love teaching because I love interacting with students and I love seeing them understand and understand,” said Hall, who looks forward to having students involved in his research.

“When a student can participate in research, especially as an undergraduate, it just helps them develop critical thinking skills,” she said.

The development of students’ critical thinking skills is an area in which Shropshire wishes to focus.

The nursing curriculum is evolving to place more emphasis on clinical judgment, and state board certification exams are developing ways to test this, she said. Shropshire said clinical judgment is new to nursing education, but not new to nurses. “We use clinical judgment every day,” she said.

“As times change it’s important for us to change so that we can help students,” said Shropshire. “I want to change my educational practice and my way of teaching. “

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Contact Lenore Sobota at (309) 820-3240. Follow her on Twitter: @Pg_Sobota

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